Mortal Kombat Live - Shang Tsung

Mortal Kombat Live Tour TV Interview (1996)

Yes, even in my youth when Dinosaurs ruled the Earth, Mortal Kombat was a pretty big thing. I became a fan of the game rather quickly. It wasn’t the violent martial arts aspect that drew me in. Although I totally did dig playing Johnny Cage, especially using his Shadow Kick move. For myself I was enamored with two elements above all. The mythology of the MK game as well as Goro, who was obviously stop motion animation. Of course this was all back in 1992, four years before the Mortal Kombat Live Tour would be unleashed.
Mortal Kombat Live - MK Live Tour Poster

Now in all honesty, it was 1993’s Mortal Kombat II that really got the ball rolling for Kombat fever. Ed Boon and John Tobias raised the bar on the amount of characters you could play. As well as seriously expanding the mythos of the game universe. Having said that however… the mythology of the game has always been fluid. Mortal Kombat II was a huge success for Midway Games and with it the merchandising began.
Mortal Kombat Live Tour - Mortal Kombat II Magazine

While I will certainly admit to being biased when it comes to characters in the game series. I believe that much of the success of Mortal Kombat II was due to Kung Lao. The former Order of Light warrior who chose to join the White Lotus Society. To better defend Earthrealm against the dark forces of Shao Khan. Of course, Kung Lao, is in fact my favorite Mortal Kombat character. Ever. It might have something to do with being a sharp dresser, not to mention that razor sharp hat he sports.
Mortal Kombat Live Tour - Kung Lao

After the releases of Mortal Kombat III as well as Ultimate MK3. It was time for the game series to step into a new direction. A live action film in 1995 starring the likes of Christopher Lambert and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa. Helmed by the future Director of Event Horizon, Resident Evil and AVP: Alien vs. Predator, Paul W.S. Anderson.

[Via] YouTube Movies

You might recall that in 1990, the popularity of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles led to a live tour. With comic books, music, toys, and of course video games being so popular. Is it any wonder that the Mortal Kombat Live Tour would come to be?
Mortal Kombat Live - Sonya Blade

To be honest, the show in fact debuted at the Radio Music City Hall in September of 1995. After that it went on a 200 city tour for 1996, featuring none other than Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa. No, not as Shang Tsung like he portrayed in the hit film, but as one of the fight coordinators!

[Via] Mortal Kombat Secrets

Obviously to drum up excitement for the Mortal Kombat Live Tour, the cast would appear on local television. Like in this 1996 segment from the KTLA 5 News in Los Angeles.

[Via] Grooveraider

Mortal Kombat Live - Scorpion

Get over here!

Lost In Space Soundtrack - christopher Lennertz - Lakeshore Records

Lost In Space Soundtrack Released By Lakeshore Records!

Friends, last week we had exciting news with the upcoming 3-CD release of The Storyteller. That excitement builds to a new level as Lakeshore Records has released Christopher Lennertz’s Lost in Space soundtrack too. My spoiler free review of the first episode was quick to praise the acting and effects. I would add that Netflix’s worthy reboot of the original ’60s TV show shines brightly with the score as well. Showrunner Zack Estrin chose wisely when picking Christopher Lennertz to compose the Lost in Space soundtrack!

Lost in Space Soundtrack - Christopher Lennertz - IMDB

Image courtesy of IMDB.

Lennertz is no stranger to composing stunning music for films and television. At this moment he has a staggering 123 credits to his name. Some notable projects from his career include The Horde, Horrible Bosses, Agent Carter, 176 episodes of Supernatural as well as the spinoff Ghostfacers. I certainly feel it is safe to say he knows his way around all manner of genres.

At the end of the review for that first episode. I made a small comment about hoping the score would be worthy of the 1998 feature film. After having watched the series and Lakeshore Records kindly letting me review the Lost in Space soundtrack itself. I can in all honesty say that Christopher has exceeded the wonderful work by Bruce Broughton. Furthermore Lennertz has crafted a score that manages to convey the emotional gist of the series.
Lost in Space Soundtrack - Robot and Will Robinson

The heroic swell heard in Main Titles, naturally builds off John Williams original theme. Parts of that iconic theme plays throughout the score for the Lost in Space soundtrack. While William’s original theme might have inspired the composer. Lennertz is solely responsible for delivering an exceptionally moving and exciting score. Friends, he deserves accolades and awards on this!

From the pulse pounding start of To The Chariot that deftly slides into a softer touch before returning to a thrilling score. Without being jarring of course. Or the absolutely moving combination of strings and piano at the beginning of The Waterfall, which in turn becomes mysterious and threatening. Lennertz with the Philharmonia Orchestra, have delivered a rousing and beautiful soundtrack. While I am indeed attempting to avoid spoilers with the names of the tracks. I will go on record stating that Will and the Robot as well as Flowers-Father And Son are two of my favorites.
Lost in Space soundtrack - John and Will Robinson

With all due respect to Lakeshore Records, I think that Zack Estrin says it better than I could. This is courtesy of the liner notes for the soundtrack:
“Much like the Robinsons themselves, there’s an underlying sense of hope to the music here. It’s a sonic rollercoaster full of fun and heart…”
Lost In Space Soundtrack - Chariot

Now the great news is Lakeshore Records have already released the soundtrack. It actually debuted at the same time as the Netflix series went live. Now you can of course hop on over to the Lakeshore’s official site and purchase it in any number of ways. I would however suggest you go the iTunes route. Why? That is because you will indeed get more than the standard 22 tracks. By going through iTunes you will get 7 more bonus tracks!

Are you ready to hear a medley of Christopher Lennert’s Lost in Space soundtrack?

[Via] Lakeshore Records

Retroist Night Court Podcast

Retroist Night Court Podcast

This week’s Retroist Podcast is about the classic sitcom, Night Court. I begin the show talking about how Harry Anderson inspired my love of magic, even though I am not that good at it.

I was not planning on doing a Night Court podcast this season. It was a subject I tried to record a few years ago, but was unhappy with it. With Harry Anderson passing away recently, I decided to take another pass on this show. I am glad I did, because this show was very meaningful for me during its original airing.

For the bulk of the show I talk about the people in front of and behind the camera, the characters, the show’s reception and much more.

This was a bittersweet show to put together, I hope you enjoy it.

Only a couple of episodes left for this season of the Retroist Podcast. I am already planning the next season. So if you have ideas, feel free to send them to me.

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Listen and download the Retroist Night Court Podcast

Thanks for listening to the show and I hope you have a great week.

The Fog Horn - The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms

Retro Radio Memories: Ray Bradbury’s The Fog Horn

Morning, friends! I have on occasion when writing for the site, mentioned my love of Ray Bradbury. In particular his tales concerning the Autumn People and the spirit of the month of October. However I have always found in many of Bradbury’s works, a sense of melancholy. Now there are times when that is wrapped within something truly horrific, like in The Playground. Other stories though like 1951’s The Fog Horn present that melancholy as doomed and deeply moving. Between a prehistoric creature from the depths of the ocean and… well, the fog horn at a light house.

It was in 1951 that Bradbury’s The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms was first published in the Saturday Evening Post. Yes, the original title for the short story was indeed the basis for the 1953 film. In fact it appears that little bit of trivia depends on who you asked. I have seen some accounts stating that Ray Bradbury was visiting his friend, the legendary stop-motion animator Ray Harryhausen. On the set of a film that was intended to be entitled Monster from the Sea. Harryhausen supposedly asked his friend to look over the script, see if he could punch up the screenplay. Bradbury of course was surprised to find a scene in the screenplay that resembled events in The Fog Horn.
The Fog Horn - Ray Harryhausen

Another story behind how Ray Bradbury’s name became attached to the 1953 film, comes from the Author himself. In the book Ray Harryhausen – Master of the Majicks Vol. 2. Bradbury was quoted as saying about a meeting with Hal Chester, the co-founder of Mutual Films who were bankrolling the movie:
“Hal Chester called me in and asked me to read the preliminary script [at this point only a rough draft treatment]. I pointed out the resemblance between it and my short story The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, which had appeared in The Saturday Evening Post during 1951. Chester’s face paled and his jaw dropped when I told him his monster was my monster.”

Bradbury states that by the next day he had received a telegram, an offer to purchase the rights to the story. For a rather staggering two thousand dollars. A deal that Bradbury obviously accepted, with the film being able to add the Author’s name to the credits!

[Via] YouTube Movies

Ray Bradbury would alter the title of his popular short story to The Fog Horn in his 1953 short story collection, The Golden Apples of the Sun. I have to admit I certainly like the new title he gave the story even better than the original. Furthermore I can’t help but feel perhaps the name change, was a bit of good-natured nose tweaking.
The Fog Horn - Ray Bradbury

The short story concerns two men, stationed in a remote light house, named Johnny and McDunn. Johnny is a younger man and acts as the narrator for the events of the tale. When one evening as the mournful wailing sound of the fog horn summons something from the depths.
The Fog Horn - The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms - Light House

Are you ready to learn of The Fog Horn and the beast from the depths that answers it’s call?


If you are still in a mood for more Ray Bradbury after that. Might I humbly remind you that we’ve covered the likes of Usher II on the Saturday Frights Podcast?
saturday-frights-usher-2