Bubble Bobble - Christoper Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Bubble Bobble (1986)

Bubble Bobble is an arcade game that I’m certain many of you will remember fondly. This marks the latest classic arcade title that Christopher Tupa has chosen for his Retro Arcade Art project. In fact I can vividly remember where I first experienced Bubble Bobble. It wasn’t at the fabled Showbiz Pizza of my youth or any local arcade. It was actually in the lobby of a movie theater. I enjoyed the game so much I excused myself from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. As the film let out I was still pumping quarters into Bubble Bobble as my Father came to collect me.
Bubble Bobble - Arcade Marquee

Bubble Bobble allows one or two Players to take on the roles of two dinosaurs. Simply named Bob and Bub. The duo are tasked with entering the Cave of Monsters. Which just so happens to be 100 levels of monster filled mayhem. Both Bub and Bob aren’t doing this for the sense of adventure. They are in fact on a quest to rescue their girlfriends who have been kidnapped!
Bubble Bobble - Intro

I should add as well the Players only have the ability to produce bubbles to protect themselves! Furthermore besides using those bubbles to trap various foes and dispatching them. Players are able to create bubbles and use them as stepping stones. To reach higher spots of course as well as navigating the maze-like stages.

When using your weapon against your foes. You let those bubbles fly which envelops the enemies. Then the Player needs to touch said bubbles to burst them – which in turn reveals food products.
Bubble Bobble - Food

Picking these up provides extra points and a skilled player will rack up even greater points by dispatching multiple enemies at the same time.
Bubble Bobble - Shooting Bubbles

It should go without saying that our heroes will lose a life if they make contact with an enemy that hasn’t been trapped. Not to mention the various projectiles that enemies can fire at Bub and Bob. Also of note is the Player only has a limited amount of time to bust those bubble trapped foes. If the enemy breaks free of its bubble prison it becomes red and moves much faster. You should think of how the bad guys behave in 1983’s Mario Bros. by Nintendo for a good example.
Bubble Bobble - Mario Bros

In Bubble Bobble there are a few more elements to help out Bob and Bud. There are types of power-ups that will grant the Player special abilities. Such as the Fire bubble which will cause a section of the nearest platform to ignite. Obliterating any enemies it might come in contact with. While our heroes won’t suffer damage they will be stunned if they are caught in the flames, until the effect wears off. Then there is the bubble housing the element of water. When struck by the Player it will cause a waterfall to pour down across the platforms to the bottom of the stage. Killing all foes it catches in the wrath of its tidal wave. Last but certainly not least is the Lightning bubble. Hitting this power-up unleashes a lightning bolt that travels horizontally across the screen slaying the enemies it touches.
Bubble Bobble - Lightning

There are certain bubbles that appear during a stage that have letters within. If a Player manages to spell Extend they will of course gain an extra life. To clear each stage, Bob and Bud must defeat all enemies.
Bubble Bobble - Extend

In closing, perhaps the duo of Bubble Bobble‘s greatest weapon is they are just so darned cute. Their charming design certainly is one of the reasons I kept pumping quarters into the game when I first discovered it!

Did you know that Bubble Bobble was so popular that a limited edition soundtrack was released in 1987?


It’s totally true. The soundtrack was released back on January 25, 1987. Featuring the music which was composed by Tadashi Kimijima and Zuntata.

[Via] Otouto72


As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

Don’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!

Mappy - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Mappy (1983)

Namco’s Mappy is not just the latest pick of for the Retro Arcade Project. It also happens to be hands down one of my favorite arcade games of all time. In fact you might recall that I shared my love for it on Episode 18 of the Diary of an Arcade Employee Podcast. While possessing cartoonish characters as you can plainly see in Christopher Tupa’s artwork. The game is quite challenging. Not to mention that I feel that Mappy happens to be one of the most overlooked offerings of the platform genre.
Mappy - Arkadia Retrocade

Besides of course sporting a rather unique arcade marquee. Mappy has a rather interesting cabinet design as well. Obviously a little more squat than your typical arcade games of the day. However in addition to that marquee it certainly makes it stand out.
Mappy - Arcade Cabinet

The gameplay for Mappy is rather simple actually. The Player takes on the titular role, a mouse who also happens to be a member of the Micro Police. His task is to retrieve all of the stolen artwork and electronic equipment in each house. Pilfered I might add by the Meowkies gang. Which of course are bandit cats. In addition they are led by Nyamco or as his cronies call him – Boss The Big Bit! I must add that much like Pac-Man the names of your enemies differ depending on which region you are playing it.
Mappy - Cast

Mappy moves up and down through the house by way of trampolines. Using the joystick the Player is able to determine which floor of the house that Mappy lands on. The Meowkies do this as well and are hot on the trail of the mouse cop. While our hero in fact carries a billy club, he sadly doesn’t use it to protect himself. Coming into contact with a Meowkie or Nyamco will of course cost the Player a life.

In Mappy you have to be careful how many times you jump on those trampolines. Each time you land and are launched into the air. The trampoline will change color. Our hero can use a trampoline three times but if you try a fourth time it will break and you will lose a life. While bouncing up and down on the trampoline at the very least, the Player needn’t worry about losing a life when passing his foes.

While our little hero doesn’t use that club to protect himself – he does in fact have a way to defend himself. An unorthodox way to dispatch those cat burglars. Mappy can use the doors throughout the houses. Opening a normal door, causes the Micro Policeman to be violently pushed back a little. Coming into contact with a Meowkie in hot pursuit will stun the kitty. Allowing Mappy to get by safely. However if the Player opens a power door – which flash in multiple colors. It releases a microwave that travels across the screen and pushes any foe it comes in contact with off the screen.
Mappy - Door Wave

However this doesn’t mean that the enemy won’t soon be back. The only way for Mappy to finish the stage is to pick up all of the stolen items in each house. Although having said that there are bonus stages after 2 to 3 rounds. In these stages you must attempt to pop as many balloons as you can before the music is finished. While there are no enemies to speak of in this stage, you will in fact have to be on the ball to complete a bonus round.
Mappy - Bonus Stage

By the way, if you are wondering about the name of this game. It is commonly believed that Mappy is a derivative of mappo. Which is actually a slang term, some see as an insulting name for a policeman.

Now that the basics of Mappy are out of the way. How about watching the game in action for yourself?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming


As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

Don’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!

Jump Bug - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Jump Bug (1981)

Jump Bug the scrolling platformer is the arcade game for this week’s Retro Arcade Art. Christopher Tupa has once again picked a lesser known title. But an important one as Jump Bug is one of the first games to us Parallax scrolling. A technique to give Players a sense of depth to the game. Believed to be developed by Hoei/Coreland but possibly funded by Alpha Denshi as well. Jump Bug was released by Sega in the Japanese market with Rock-Ola distributing in North America.
Jump Bug - Arcade Marquee

Jump Bug is aptly name. As the Player is tasked with controlling a literally bouncing VW Beetle. As usual with early arcade titles the amount of imagination in the design of the game is incredible.

Jump Bug - Arcade Flyer Archive

Image courtesy of the Arcade Flyer Archive.

The Player can control both the height of the jump as well as descent by way of the joystick. Jump Bug has to navigate through eight different levels. Bouncing on the rooftops of a city or even on the passing clouds. Collecting bulging money bags and jewels and trying to avoid crashing into bad guys along the way.
Jump Bug - City

Besides having the enviable talent of defying gravity of course, Jump Bug also seems equally comfortable under water.
Jump Bug - Under the Sea

Did I forget to mention that in Jump Bug you can also explore ancient pyramids?
Jump Bug - Pyramid

Now our super-powered VW Beetle also has the ability to protect itself. The Player has aid of a fire button that will shoot out a projectile from the front of the car. However the enemies are often very fast or behave erratically. Not to mention the natural dangers you need to avoid such as waterfalls, geyser eruptions, etc.

How about checking out Jump Bug in action?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming


As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project! Might make that perfect gift for the Arcade Addict in your life, right?

Don’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!

Tapper - Christoper Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Tapper (1983)

Tapper is a great choice from Christopher Tupa, for this week’s Retro Arcade Art. Developed by Marvin Glass and Associates. Who I should add were responsible for a few games and toys you might recall. Ever hear of Operation or Mouse Trap? While Tapper may have been developed by Glass it was released by Bally Midway.
Tapper - Arcade Marquee

I think we should tackle the Tapper name right out of the gate. This classic arcade title has the distinction of being produced by Budweiser!
Tapper - Budweiser Arcade

It is a fact that the arcade cabinet has one of the most distinctive designs. The brass rail at the bottom of the machine for Players to rest a foot. As well as some featuring ashtray holders on the side of the control panel.
Tapper - Arcade Cabinet

While those are definitely unique features to be sure. However for a game that was mostly carried in family-friendly arcades. A lot of parents saw Tapper as promoting drinking and smoking. Which is why of course that Bally Midway released Root Beer Tapper as an alternative a mere year later.

Gone were the ashtrays and brass rail. The side art had even been altered to showcase a character that looked more like a soda jerk than a bartender. Naturally all elements of the Budweiser brand had been removed from the game as well.
Tapper - Root Beer Sign

As for the gameplay for Tapper it’s easy to understand but hard to master. Tapper must keep slinging frosty glasses of root beer to his thirsty patrons. Who appear in early stages in small numbers but increase in later levels.

On the first couple of stages you will be serving cowboys in a western bar. Followed by an outside event with sports fans. Then you will need to contend with angry punk rockers in a basement bar. And finally you will head to outer space to serve some aliens.

This is done by pulling on the tap which of course fills up the mug in Tapper‘s hand. Releasing the tap slings the full mug across the bar to a waiting patron. Doing so might result in a happy guest being pushed outside the doors. In fact you need to clear the bar of all patrons before being able to complete the stage. Of course if there is no one to receive a mug it crashes to the floor and you lose a life. The same thing will occur as well if you fail to retrieve a mug that the patron sends back to be refilled.
Tapper - Empty Mug

Also if a patron reaches the end of the bar without being served they lose their temper. Taking it out on the Player in fact by sliding Tapper across the bar and out the door. Resulting in a loss of a life of course.

Players can move up and down at the edges of the bar. In later stages the ends of the bar are often split up. Two might have you serving from the right side and two on the left, etc. Besides picking up the empty mugs which will net you points, some patrons will leave a tip. Collecting this will cause a quick dance number to start up which usually distracts the patrons. Giving you a couple of seconds to collect empty mugs and not get overwhelmed.
Tapper - Dancers

In addition to slinging root beer, between the changes in venue. There is a quick mini-game. A bandit shakes up all but one can of root beer. Then slams his fist against the counter causing them to rotate – forcing the player to keep a sharp eye on the unshaken can. Otherwise when you open the wrong can Tapper gets a face full of soda. Find the right can of course and you get a hefty bonus to your score.

Now that you know the rules of Tapper, why not watch it in action?

[Via] Barry Bloso


As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

Don’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art project as well!

Kaos - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Kaos (1981)

Christopher Tupa has done it again. With Kaos his pick for this week’s Retro Arcade Art. He has chosen another arcade title that I have not heard of before. I am going to go out on a limb and assume that many of you have not heard of Kaos before today as well!

While Kaos might be a mystery to you. I will add that who is responsible for the design and production of the game also requires some sleuthing. If you go with the knowledgeable folks over at the International Arcade Museum the credit goes to Taiyo. Although as can be seen from that attract screen as well as the arcade cabinet itself, it was released by GamePlan, inc.
Kaos - Arcade Machine

However, mystery of who gets credit for Kaos aside. This 1981 game belongs to the maze genre of classic arcade titles. Although having said that this isn’t like Pac-Man. In fact it is a vertical maze that the Players have to navigate – jumping from one moving platform to another. I honestly feel that 1982’s Zoo Keeper was inspired by Kaos for the former’s bonus level.

Now the gameplay for Kaos is rather simple. Players attempt to catch coins as they glide across the moving platforms towards the bottom of the stage.
Kaos - Stage 1

This isn’t just because you are trying to rack up points of course. It turns out that in this video game universe when a coin reaches the bottom of the screen it becomes a deadly dragon! Who will naturally give chase to the Player.
Kaos - Dragons

As you might imagine if a dragon catches the Player you lose a life. But at the very least you can take comfort that you helped to fill a dragon’s stomach, right?
Kaos - Dragon is Fed

In later stages the dragons will actually spawn from the top of the stage. Beyond that another threat is the maze itself. For example some of the platforms will have walls attached to them that can slide you off. Or worse yet in early levels they can rake you to the side of the screen where you will be electrocuted. However in some later stages you can safely wraparound to the other side. Thankfully before each stage it will give you a friendly warning. In addition if you slip through a crack in the platforms at the bottom of the screen you will be fried as well.

Take heart though brave adventurer! The Player isn’t totally without a way to fight back. If you jump up to the top of the stage and make contact with a green pyramid. You are transformed into an almighty dragon-slaying King! At least for a little while. You can rush towards the foes and dispatch them with a touch…and net yourself a nice score in the process.

Kaos - King

Hail to the King, Baby!

Feel like trying Kaos for yourself? Good news it’s totally available on the Internet Archive Arcade!


Kaos - Service Manual


As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

Don’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art project as well!
(Beezer)
(Bomb Jack)
(Devil Fish)
(Dig Dug)
(Inferno)
(Kangaroo)