Chack'n Pop - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Chack’n Pop (1984)

Have you ever heard of Taito’s Chack’n Pop? Until Christopher Tupa chose it for his latest Retro Arcade Art project, I certainly had not. Right off the bat, Chack’n Pop has some interesting history. While the title screen reads it was a 1983 title, it has been reported that it actually was released in 1984. A cross between Bomber Man and Arabian, Chack’n Pop certainly stands out!
Chack'n Pop - Title Screen

Interestingly enough while no sequels to the game would be released. Taito did actually keep some elements of the title, namely the characters. For example two of the characters appear in 1995’s Bubble Memories – The Story of Bubble Bobble III, namely the Monstas and Mightas. In addition Mr. Chack’n has joined the bad guys in that sequel! As well as nods in Bubble Bobble with Level 29 being based on the stage design of Chack’n Pop, and this is only naming just a few of the references.
Chack'N Pop - Bubble Bobble - Level 29

Now then, the premise of the game is that Mr. Chack’n must regain the hearts of Miss Chack’n. Stolen by the Monstas and secreted away to an underground maze.

Thankfully for the players, you have bombs at your disposal to take out the enemies. However you can only use two, hurling them in separate directions at any time. You have to be careful though as the bombs can take you out as well. Of course making contact with a Monsta will result in a loss of life as well.
Chack'n Pop - Bombs Away

Those very bombs must also be used to break open the cages the Mighta’s have used to trap the hearts. If the Player frees all the hearts, they can escape through the upper right exit, assuming it hasn’t taken too long and the Mightas have sealed the maze.

In Chack’n Pop our main protagonist can get around the maze in unique ways. For one thing he can walk on both the floor and ceilings of the outcroppings.
Chack'n Pop - Ceiling

For climbing up to and over said outcroppings in a stage, Mr. Chack’n is able to extend his legs. It in fact effectively replaces the need for a jump button.
Chack'n Pop - New Heights

Not only does the Player have to worry about the Mighta attempting to seal the maze. If they take to long, eggs hatch more Monstas which easily will swarm the player. It appears however that there is a power-up that occasionally appears. Picking it up with allow you to run into your foes and defeat them, similar of course to power pellets in Pac-Man.
Chack'n Pop - Power Up

I have already mentioned that I didn’t even know this game existed. Just one of the many joys of having CTupa doing these art projects. I will definitely be adding Chack’n Pop to my list of games to cover on the Diary podcast.

You know some of the game mechanics of Chack’n Pop now. Ready to see it in action?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming

As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

I hope you won’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art project as well!

I have found no evidence of it but I assume Chack’n Pop influenced Lionel Ritchie’s Dancing on the Ceiling

[Via] Lionel Richie Vevo

Pengo - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Pengo (1982)

Pengo is the subject for this week’s Retro Arcade Art, proving that CTupa has good taste as well as being a talented illustrator. Pengo is an absolutely charming maze game although one with a twist. It was developed by Coreland Technology, a subcontractor for Sega. In fact Sega is the one that released Pengo to the arcades back in September of 1982.

I mentioned of course that Pengo is a maze game. A maze of frozen blocks of ice at that, with the addition that Players can alter that maze as they play. Pengo will push an ice block it comes in contact with, when the action button is pressed. If there is nothing blocking its path it will slide across the stage until it hits the edge of the screen or another ice block.
Pengo - Push Ice Block

Another action Pengo can take is to destroy those ice blocks. When performing the same action in fact, if the ice block is made stationary. It will crumble and disappear. A useful action to take indeed when attempting to evade the Sno-Bees that stalk you.
Pengo - Cracking Ice Block

However as you can see in the screencap those crafty Sno-Bees can do the very same thing. Much like in Atari’s Dig-Dug, when a lone enemy realizes they are it. They will hurriedly try to escape, by heading to one of the four corners of the screen.

In Pengo the Player will lose a life if the Sno-Bees come in contact with our adorable protagonist. So naturally that is why you will spend so much time in the game gleefully hurling those ice blocks against your foes. Not only is destroying all Sno-Bees the way to successfully end the round…it’s addictive.

Of course destroying the enemies at the start of a game doesn’t mean you’ve cleared a stage yet. You see the truth of the matter is there are eggs hidden within the ice blocks in a level. Take out one Sno-Bee and the eggs will begin to hatch. However you will see their location flash at the start of the stage. Which means if you are quick you can take them out while running around the maze.
Pengo - Eggs

If Pengo touches the edges of the wall and uses the action button, any Sno-Bee that is touching the edges will be stunned. Which will allow a Player to crush them easily with an ice block if one is available. Or even run over the enemy and take them out without losing a life.
Pengo - Wall Shake

You now know a few of the basics of Pengo, so why not watch it in action?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming

As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

I hope you won’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art project as well!

Mr Do! - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Mr Do! (1982)

Christopher Tupa has certainly picked a fantastic and often overlooked game this week. Mr Do! has a lot of history here on the Retroist. Not only was it the second episode spotlighted on the Diary of an Arcade Employee Podcast. But in fact the Retroist himself tackled the game on his 105th podcast! In all honesty, Ctupa’s pick for this week’s Retro Arcade Art project deserves far more attention.

I say that Mr Do! deserves more attention because it gets overshadowed by Dig-Dug. I of course know that there are indeed some similarities between the two classic games.

Obviously with the latter you are playing a game where the goal is digging underground. Dispatching foes with your trusty pump or even boulders. Where as in Mr Do! the Player takes on the role of a clown digging through the strata. Taking out the bad guys with the aid of a power ball and oversized apples.

Friends, let me get right to the point. In my youth I felt that Dig-Dug was the better arcade game. It wasn’t until many, many years later that I realized that it was in fact Mr Do! that was the superior title. I realize of course you might be wanting some proof to back up that bold claim.

For one I feel our clown-themed game has more going for it. For example while you might be able to dig under the boulders and squash bad guys in Dig-Dug. With Mr Do! you can do the same as well as push those apples over the edge, letting them drop down the tunnels you’ve created.
Mr Do! - Apple Trap

Did I forgot to mention that the monsters can push those apples off towards you as well?
Mr Do! - Monsters and Apples

Furthermore, not only are the foes the Player must contend with more aggressive in Mr Do!. But while you always have your pump in Dig-Dug. The Player must hurl their power ball and hope it doesn’t bounce down the wrong tunnel!
Mr Do! - Powerball

Every time the Player uses the power ball, it takes longer to regenerate. As well as the fact you can clear a stage in multiple ways. A level will be completed if you pick up all the cherries, wipe out all the monsters, or by snagging the rare diamond.
Mr Do! - Diamond

Players can end a stage too by defeating monsters sporting letters. If you happen to spell out the word ‘extra’ you advance to the next level. However you also have to contend with Alphamonsters who gobble up those apples and hunt you down!
Mr Do! - Alphamonsters

I suppose in closing the reason I feel Mr Do! is the better arcade game, is that it requires so much more skill to play. Please bear in mind this is merely my personal opinion, friends.
Mr Do! - Universal Sticker

You know a little about Mr Do! now. So why not watch the game in action?

As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

I hope you won’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!

Bubbles - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Bubbles (1982)

Bubbles! Another classic arcade title released by William’s Electronics in 1982. The company was totally on a roll with their games. Each and every release seemed to be a classic between ’82 and ’83. Joust, Moon Patrol, Sinistar and Robotron: 2084 to name a few. Christopher Tupa certainly picked one of my favorite arcade games for his latest Retro Arcade Art project. However, depending on if you go by the fans of classic arcade titles on the internet. It certainly seems that CTupa and myself might be in the minority when it comes to our love of Bubbles!

When Bubbles was being developed, a simple goal was in mind. According to co-creator John Kotlarik: “What I was trying to do with Bubbles was come up with a non-violent, clean game (no pun intended)”.

One would be hard pressed in fact to argue that an anthropomorphic soap bubble isn’t a clean cut gaming icon, right?
Bubbles - Title Screen

Furthermore, Kotlarik as well as William’s Tim Murpy and the legendary Python Anghelo were succesful in injecting personality into the soapy protagonist. Including of course the adding of non-violent nature to Bubbles gameplay. I mean what is the main goal of the game but the cleaning of a dirty kitchen sink?
Bubbles - Bubbles Face

While unlike the standard titles from the Golden Age of arcade games. The Player has no ability to fire a projectile at their enemies nor even any way to truly defend themselves from threats. The Player merely has an 8 way joystick to help navigate past those foes and other deadly obstacles.

In Bubbles the Player starts off as a tiny bubble. Insignificant perhaps but passing over – cleaning – the equally tiny ants and grime will help the Player to grow in size. Eventually forming that smiling face you can see in the image above. Which also allows the the protagonist to make contact with the likes of scrub brushes and sponges without losing a life. Instead of sadly popping – the bubble will bounce back and lose some of it’s size.
Bubbles - Razors

Of course hazards such as the razor blades will always cost a Player a life. Which in turn begs the question of whose sink you cleaning. Maybe Hannibal Lecter?

With Bubbles you must also contend with a pesky roach infestation. The Player is only able to safely touch these foes if they’ve picked up a broom. Which is done by scooping up the cleaning ladies that appear during the stage.
Bubbles - Cleaning Woman

Finishing a level requires the Player to grow in size enough to obtain that smiling face. In which case the center of the drain flashes green. Allowing a Player to skip to the next level. On the other hand if all objects that provide points have managed to slip down the drain or even been cleaned up by those brushes. The Player loses a life and has to replay that stage again.

I mentioned what seems to be a dislike of Bubbles at the beginning of the post. It might very well in fact be a small but vocal group. But of those Players that remember the game that I questioned last week. I will say again – CTupa and myself seem to be a small few who have a fondess for the game.

By the way the first time I played the game myself was at that fabled Showbiz Pizza of my youth. Having said that though, ours wasn’t lucky enough to have one of the beautiful Duramold cabinets. Besides the unique cabinet the control panel also offered different control panel artwork.

Bubbles - Duramold Cabinet - Bubbles Tribute

Friends, this image is courtesy of the Bubbles Tribute page.

Bubbles - Duramold Controls

With a little knowledge of Bubbles under your belt. How about watching the game in action?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming

As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

I hope you won’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!
Retro Arcade Art - Christoper Tupa

Moon Patrol - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Moon Patrol (1982)

With Moon Patrol being this week’s Retro Arcade Art pick. Christopher Tupa has once again chosen a game from William’s Electronics. Already with the artist’s new art project we have covered the likes of Sinistar and Inferno from William’s. Moon Patrol is an arcade classic and one that I might add I covered in the very first episode of the Diary of an Arcade Employee podcast.

There is so much to love about Moon Patrol. It’s sci-fi setting of course is a great place to start. I can certainly tell you how impressed I was the first time I stepped up to the machine. Seconds later I found myself cruising in my moon buggy across the lunar surface. In an attempt to reach check points before the timer has reached zero. Doing my best all the while to leap craters in the moon and boulders strewn about the landscape.
Moon Patrol - Crater Jump

Or of course you can just blast those rocky formations with the cannons on the front of the moon buggy.
Moon Patrol - Boulder Blast

However when playing Moon Patrol the player has to keep an eye on the skies as well. Because that is where the enemy space ships will show up. Harrying the Player with bombs from above. Thankfully your roof mounted cannon can blow them out of the sky if your shot connects.
Moon Patrol - Bombers

This swarming tactic is indeed deadly. Not that the alien ships will actually swoop down low enough to crash into your moon buggy. They do not need to do so as in fact the Tri-Orb crafts hurls missiles in front of you. These blast open new craters in front of your moon buggy!
Moon Patrol - New Crater

Moon Patrol‘s rules are very easy to pick up. Mastering the game however is a totally different ball of wax. Or perhaps moon cheese in this case? While blasting or leaping over the boulders takes a steady eye…what do you do when you find yourself caught in an avalanche?
Moon Patrol - Boulders

While the Player is racing across the lunar surface they must also beware of carnivorous plants. They lay in wait at the bottom of certain craters and will reach up to snatch your moon buggy. You can blast them with a shot from your front mounted cannon but must still deal with crater. Furthermore on certain stages you must contend with rocket cars who will smash into you from behind.
Moon Patrol - Space Plants

Now then, that is a lot to take in. I realize this but if you are going to play Moon Patrol there is more. Players must also try to nimbly jump over patches of mines.
Moon Patrol - Mines

As well as the sentient tank sentries left on the course in some stages. While, the good news is they are stationary. The shells they shoot at your moon buggy will stop your own shot so you have to quickly fire off another to blast the tank.
Moon Patrol - Tank

Now then, you know a little of Moon Patrol, so why not watch it in action?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming

Retro Arcade Art - Christoper Tupa
As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

I hope you won’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!

Need more Moon Patrol information?


Perhaps you have already listened to the Diary episode for Moon Patrol? Well, I was fortunate enough to be invited to give my thoughts on the game just last month on the Ten Pence Arcade Podcast. An exceptional podcast by Victor Marland and Shaun Holley. It focuses on the Top 50 arcade games of all time. As voted on by the listeners of the podcast!
Moon Patrol - Ten Pence Arcade Podcast