Full On YouTube – Vision Quest

Did you know you can see some of the best movies from our childhoods on YouTube in their entirety? They are

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I just watched Vision Quest for the first time last week, but I have been influenced by it or movies like it all my life. What a perfect representation of the 80s bittersweet/forbidden/impossible/unrequited love genre. It was made even more influential by Madonna’s “Crazy For You”, which I understand was written and recorded for the film. The movie was even called Crazy For You in some countries. Some people have panned this movie, but I found Louden to be just about everything I was back then: smart yet goofy, socially-ackward and prone to embarassment but driven by strong, genuine emotions. There are two copies of the movie on YouTube. I’ll link both here in case one disappears. Do yourself a favor and watch one of them.

80s Movie Poster Heroes and their Ladies

Vision Quest was one of the movies I missed in the 80s. I finally got around to watching it tonight. I liked it, and there is lots I could say about it: Matthew Modine, Daphne Zuninga, the old man from Home Alone, the 80s sound track (Berlin, John Waite, REO Speedwagon, Journey), the actual appearance of Madonna, the meandering way movies of that time had. But what I really left the movie with is a greater appreciation of the poster.
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I had seen the poster before and liked it. I don’t know why it never led me to the movie, but I still liked it. On the surface, there’s not much to like. It’s just a guy and a girl. But below that, it expresses one of the most important ideas of an 80s film: the proximity of the hero to the heroine. Look at how Modine is embracing Fiorentino: its not only intimate and slightly sexual but also tender. She is affirming him and he is protecting her.

You see similar hero-heroine poses in several other movie posters.

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(Okay, maybe this one shouldn’t count.)

It was an idea communicated in pictures, not words or actions. But it was one I clearly received, and one that I still love today.