I see dead Weebles!

Back in the early 1970s, the Weebles toy line (“Weebles wobble but they don’t fall down!”) had a variety of playsets for those cute little egg-shaped people to populate. From a passenger airplane to a camper van, from a boat marina to a treehouse, the Weeble world was wonderful.

Except for that one playset on the outskirt of Weebleville. The one whispered about down at the Weeble playground. The playset where few Weebles dared to wobble.

It is…the Weebles Haunted House!

[source: youtube user: spuzzlightyeartoo]

It looks like an awesome place to be!

I was a small child in the early Seventies but I do not recall having had any Weebles sets. However, today I would think I would’ve enjoyed having this Haunted House back then. The glow-in-the-dark Weeble Ghost is the main selling point for me but the idea of a toy encouraging me to go play in the dark would have been a deal killer. As a little kid, I was scared of the dark. Perhaps I would have braved this fear for the sake of playing with the  Weebles Haunted House.

Search “weebles” here on the Retroist and see more posts like this:

Ghost Weeble Bop Bag

Fisher Price Alpha Interceptor

Fisher Price Alpha Interceptor

I’ve been collection Fisher Price Adventure People for a few years now and this is the first boxed vehicle from that line that I have run across in the wild. I was initially excited when I saw the $14.99 price tag, but the contents were incomplete and the box was in pretty poor shape. This picture doesn’t relay the amount of duct tape that was used to hold it together, and although the ship and instructions were inside the box, the man was missing and the instructions (and possible the box) had sustained some water damage.

Since I already own a loose version of this ship I had to leave this one behind on the shelf, but finding something like this in the wild always gives me hope that I’ll find something else the next time!

(Ages 5-9, hah!)

Vintage Robot Toys

Last weekend I attended a local antique flea market, held monthly at our local fairgrounds. I found a lot of great retro items there, and although I didn’t buy much this time around I did take lots of pictures of cool items I thought you all would enjoy.

First up were these sweet vintage metal robot toys.

I don’t know anything about toy robots other than the fact that I adore them. Each of these were priced between $25-$50 — too much if you wanted to buy then all, but just right if you found one you couldn’t live without.

I think that green robot looks angry because somebody has been pushing his buttons

Paperback Book Ads FROM Paperback Books

I found the Fighting Fantasy Books on Kindle, but I still wanted a hard copy for old time’s sake. So I ordered a first-printing Deathtrap Dungeon, the printing I had checked out from the library as a kid and still remembered today. When it arrived today, I was surprised to find it was much thinner than I remembered. I guess I have grown over the years and things don’t look as big to me as they did then. I was also surprised and delighted to find advertisements for other books in the back. Paperback books, particulary of the horror/sci-fi variety (i.e., the variety I read) had ads in the back for other books. I almost never saw these books outside of these advertisements; I was limited to what the library had back then, so if the library didn’t get it, neither did I. But I always liked seeing them advertised, seeing that there was more excitement and adventure to be had out there. Here’s the ads I found in Deathtrap Dungeon:

Vintage Tom Sawyer Book

I was a pretty avid (and early) reader as a kid. Some of my earliest teachers didn’t know quote what to do with a kid that was already reading, but a few them helped nurture my love of books. One of those teachers was my third grade teacher, Mrs. Estrada. When I left third grade, Mrs. Estrada gave me this copy of “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” by Mark Twain. The book was old and worn when she gave it to me 30 years ago, and looks older and more worn now.

I ran across the book while out cleaning my garage last weekend. After opening up the book I saw something that I must’ve known but had forgotten. Right above where Mrs. Estrata wrote my name in the book for me, you can see that the book was originally a Christmas gift for a boy named Howard in 1945.

The last page of the book contains Howard’s full name and address. I’m going to try and contact him and see if he wants his book back. I’ll let you know how it goes.