Allison Doesn’t Know Jack….About Movies!

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Well, I’m insulted.

Or is it that I just don’t know a Jack?

Oh wait, I do know a Jack.

This game IS insulting me!

Related:

Joey, Do You Like Gladiator Movies? How Do You Feel About American Gladiators…The Game?

Allison Doesn’t Know Jack

You didn’t really think I’d avoid shamelessly promoting the first and second gameplay videos in this series, right?

Now why would I not do that?

First things first, I want to thank all of you have watched and supported both of my Retroist gameplay videos – these gameplay videos have proven to be incredibly fun to make. As always, I’m grateful for the opportunity to share my mad skills with you, gaming, writing, or otherwise. And by mad, I mean “it has to be a game I can successfully beat, or something I can write the hell out of!” And by you, I mean the small but captive audience that comes here for my gameplay and sharp, witty writing skills.

Thank you for the millionth time!

With that out of the way…

When my interest piqued in playing You Don’t Know Jack Television again after a ten-year hiatus (those ten years were not voluntary, trust me!), I figured it was only natural that I go ahead and give the other game I received as a gift at the same time the gameplay treatment. So I plunked down an additional $2.99 for a download of You Don’t Know Jack Movies from Amazon.

I’m not going to tell you I’m particularly impressive with this one – television has and always will be my thing, but I do like movies. And this game has ’em, and like the Television game, the questions are dated, since this version?is also from 1997.

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You Don’t Know Jack Movies takes the conventional YDKJ spin, applies it to the film industry, and dishes out smartass commentary and questions about films you know and love…if anything done before 1997 is your thing. It was released on April 30, 1997, right before the Television game (like seriously, it came out a little over a week before the Television game). Much like the Television game, I played it often, but it too was lost during a move 10 years ago. Also like the Television game, I searched for it, but it eventually fell off my radar. The game is also part of several compilation sets (my boyfriend bought it as part of the Classic Pack through Steam), but since my interests lie primarily with the Television and Movie games, I bought mine individually through Amazon.

As I said, I’m not as impressive skill-wise with this game, but I do enjoy the insults for the ones I don’t answer correctly, or don’t answer at all. If you’d like to see how I did, go ahead and click play below. Again, there’s no talking during this one, as it detracts heavily from the gameplay itself. I promise a future gameplay where you can hear me ramble on and on, but until then, just watch me play You Don’t Know Jack Movies!

Thanks for watching, and try not to let the game insult you.

 

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You know, like it insults me.

When Allison isn’t being the incredibly talented GIPHY maker, writer, and trivia game whiz she is all over Retroist, she is doing all of this over on her blog, Allison’s Written Words. She wants you to think there is a magic to everything she does, but there isn’t. She would love for you to take a peek over there, and to follow her blog on Facebook if you like updates. Oh, and she’s on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut. She’d love to hear from you.

Go on, reach out and tweet her!

The A-Z of the Atari 2600

Amazon.com recommendations are hit and miss for me. A couple of weeks ago, they got a hit. They recommended a little ebook called The A-Z of the Atari 2600 (Retro Gaming A-Z) by Justin Kyle.
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The A-Z of the Atari 2600 is pretty much like my own ANESthetized. While ANESthetized talked about the Nintendo Entertainment System console and games, The A-Z of the Atari 2600 talks about the 2600 (or VCS for you old-timers) console and games. It covers some 30 or so of the best 2600 games, giving full-color pictures of the box art and screen shots as well.
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I bought and read The A-Z of the Atari 2600 and loved it so much that I contacted the author for an interview. He graciously agreed to join me in a podcast about the 2600. You can find that podcast here, and if you’d like to buy the book, you can get that here.

8-Bitty Game Controller

Greetings from the road, Retro fans! Once again I find myself traveling across the country for work. Last night during some downtime in the hotel, I finally got a chance to try out one of my Christmas gifts I’ve been meaning to open — the 8-Bitty gamepad.

The 8-Bitty is a bluetooth gamepad designed to be compatible with the iCade. Any game that supports the iCade also supports the 8-Bitty. That includes over a hundred games for the iPad and Android devices. The 8-Bitty requires two AAA batteries (and has an on/off switch on the back to greatly extend their lifespan). Installation is comparable to any other bluetooth device. It took about 10 seconds to sync before it was ready to use.

With the 8-Bitty synced to the iPad, I fired up iMAME and was able to immediately start playing. In MAME the start and select buttons on the controller are mapped to add coins and start the game. The controller features 8 buttons in all: in addition to start and select there are four action buttons and two shoulder buttons.

After MAME I fired up the Atari Classic Collection and played some Asteroids, Bowling, and Yars’ Revenge. I thought the gamepad worked okay overall. I don’t think the d-pad feels as good as an original Nintendo pad, but it’s passable. The gamepad is easily small enough to throw in a pocket or backpack and take with you on the road. I’m sure the 8-Bitty will become a permanent addition to my travel pack in the future!

Vintage Games

I recently got a lot of Barnes & Noble and Amazon gift cards. I spent them all on ebooks, several of which were about vintage video games. One book I didn’t buy but was interested in was Vintage Games. Why didn’t I buy it? Because I could get it from the library and I’m cheap.
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Vintage games covers a whole host of games from a whole host of systems across both the retro and the almost-current era. The book is divided into a series of chapters, each of which basically covers one genre (shooter, fighting, racing, etc.) These chapters are named for one game (Pole Position, Pac-Man, Space Invaders, Legend of Zelda, Super Mario Bros., etc) but typically cover many more (the Space Invaders chapter touches on Galaxian, Galaga, and other shooters).
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A lot of the games in this book were not retro enough for me to be really interesting, but I liked the book enough to read all the chapters. If you’re interested in this book, you can find it in your local library as I did, buy it, or read some of the online bonus chapters which you can find here.