Trailer Tuesday: Chinatown (1974)


I was a little too young to watch Chinatown in the theatres when it was first released and sadly it wasn’t until I was in my late teens that I was able to first catch this absolute masterpiece of film neo-noir by Roman Polanski (Rosemary’s Baby) and starring Jack Nicholson (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, The Shining), Faye Dunaway (Bonnie & Clyde, Network), and John Huston (The Maltese Falcon, The Man Who Would Be King).

Since I’m firmly entrenched in playing Rockstar’s film Noir inspired game, L.A. Noire, it seemed the perfect time to post about Chinatown!

A big thanks to Jacknicholsonbr for posting this over at YouTube!

Set in Los Angeles during 1937, the film is based on historical disputes in Southern California that had reared their head during the 1910’s and 1920’s. Though I won’t spoil what the disputes were actually over…it is kind of important to the plot of the story and I refuse to ruin it for anyone who hasn’t had the pleasure of seeing the film yet.

Just a little bit of trivia, the weasel with the knife in the trailer that attacks Jack Nicholson is the film’s director, Roman Polanski. This was also the last movie that Polanski filmed in the U.S. as he fled to France in 1977 for charges against him involving a minor.

If you found yourself intrigued by the trailer above go ahead and do yourself a favor and take some time to watch this film, I’d would say it ranks in my top ten movies of all time.

Trailer Tuesday: The Time Machine (1960)

Directed by the legendary George Pal (Tom Thumb, The 7 Faces Of Dr. Lao) and starring Rod Taylor (The Birds, Inglourious Basterds), Alan Young (Mr. Ed, Mr. Belvedere Goes to College, Duck Tales), and the beautiful Yvette Mimieux (Where The Boys Are, Black Hole). While not exactly 100% faithful to the classic novel by H.G. Wells, it probably comes the closest to the source material.

I have the TBS Sunday Morning Movie to thank for my love of not only the film but the book it was based on. A lot of my love for classic films were started right here with the Time Machine. This is one of those rare films for me, I can just watch it over and over again. It also has an absolutely moving soundtrack:

If you’ve not had the chance to watch this classic Sci-Fi film, do yourself a favor and seek it out. A big thanks to Fraserw2 for the theatrical trailer and to Lordhelmchen76 for the score excerpt.

Trailer Tuesday: Clue (1985)

Featuring an amazing amount of comedic talent, Clue, was directed by Jonathan Lynn (Twice a Fortnight, Nuns on the Run) who collaborated on the screenplay with none other than John Landis (Animal House, Blues Brothers, An American Werewolf in London). The story revolves around six strangers who are invited to a mansion on a dark and stormy night in what seems to be the 1950’s to attend a party for one, Mr. Boddy (Lee Ving). As each guests arrive though they are informed by Boddy’s butler, Wadsworth (Tim Curry), that each of them has been given a pseudonym to protect their identity, for it is soon revealed they are all being blackmailed.

The cast also includes:
Mr. Green (Michael McKean)
Mrs. White (Madeline Khan)
Professor Plum (Christopher Lloyd)
Miss Scarlet (Lesley Ann Warren)
Mrs. Peacock (Eileen Breenan)
Colonel Mustard (Martin Mull)
Mrs. Ho (Kellye Nakahara)
Yvette (Colleen Camp)

At the beginning of the dinner the strangers meet Mr. Boddy in person and it is then that Wadsworth explains he has brought all of them together so that they can confront his employer and turn him over to the police. Mr. Boddy replies with a counteroffer, the guests should take up the weapons provided (A gun, wrench, lead pipe, dagger, and rope, sound familiar?) and murder Wadsworth, then destroy the evidence against them. Someone however decides to take an entirely different option…

Clue had an absolutely inspiring gimmick in that during its initial theatrical run with three different endings, the ending would change depending on which movie theater you viewed it at! It wasn’t until VHS that I was finally able to see all three endings but thanks to the magic of the all knowing Wikipedia…there was a fourth ending that was scripted and filmed but never seen except for in the Clue Storybook and novelization, remember when almost all movies received a novelization? Be warned though for posted below are things that could be considered SPOILERS!

“Wadsworth, after pretending to be dead, says that he killed Boddy as well as the other victims, and then reveals to the guests that he has poisoned them all so that there will be no witnesses and he will have committed the perfect crime. As he runs through the house to disable the phones and lock the doors, the chief detective – who had earlier been posing as an evangelist (a cameo by Howard Hesseman) – returns, followed by the police, who disarm Wadsworth. Wadsworth then repeats the confession that he had given earlier to the guests, physically acting out each scene himself. When he arrives at the part about meeting Colonel Mustard at the door, he steps through the door, closes it, and locks it, leaving all the guests trapped inside. The police and guests escape through a window, while Wadsworth attempts to make a getaway in a police squad car, only to hear the growling of a Doberman Pinscher from the backseat.”

It didn’t happen very often in my youth but Clue was a film that my Father hated vehemently, which is odd because he really is a big fan of slapstick comedy, and I was enthralled with. During the ride home it was kind of awkward, I would keep trying to bring up my favorite scenes and he would just keep turning the radio up louder and louder.

A big thanks to mpwmcfly for posting that HQ version of the Clue trailer!

Trailer Tuesday: Bugsy Malone (1976)


I didn’t get the pleasure of seeing Bugsy Malone when it first hit the silver screen in 1976, my first introduction to this film was during summer break in the early 80’s at one of the weekday matinee shows my local Malco theater put on for kids. Bugsy Malone is a movie where the entire cast were kids and better yet it was all about the days of prohibition in New York in 1929. I was hooked from the first few moments

Directed by Alan Parker (Midnight Express, Fame, Angel Heart, Mississippi Burning, and the Commitments to name a few.) this film was the introduction of Scott Baio. Jodie Foster at the age of 13 was already a ‘veteran’ and was quite upset to learn during the red carpet premiere that her singing parts had been dubbed by an adult. Thanks to Wikipedia I learned that the brilliant songwriter of the film, Paul Williams, had this to say about the experience: “I’m really proud of the work and the only thing I’ve ever doubted is the choice of using adult voices. Perhaps I should have given the kids a chance to sing the songs.” Alan Parker also commented: “Watching the film after all these years, this is one aspect that I find the most bizarre. Adult voices coming out of these kids’ mouths? I had told Paul that I didn’t want squeaky kids voices and he interpreted this in his own way. Anyway, as the tapes arrived, scarcely weeks away from filming, we had no choice but to go along with it!”