Avengers - British Pathe

Did 1961’s The Avengers Influence Real Life?

Ah, the gloriousness that was The Avengers. The program’s stories successfully mixed elements of Cold War with sci-fi. Furthermore like 1967’s The Prisoner it found a cult following when it reached the states. How could it not though? Especially when in 1965 it added the beautiful Diana Rigg as Emma Peel to the mix? A perfect foil in fact to the more proper gentleman represented by Patrick Macnee’s John Steed!

[Via] Route Master 19

While I was born a little too late to catch The Avengers in it’s original airing. I was lucky enough in High School to see the episodes that were played in reruns on A&E. I really fell for the show in a hard way. Even mimicking the clothing style of John Steed…to a degree. I certainly couldn’t afford to go to school in a Savile Row suit – but a trenchcoat and fedora would do in a pich. As well as a sturdy umbrella at my side and it was all too easy to play the part of the gentleman.
Avengers - Mr. Vic Sage

Of course back then I didn’t actually realize I was actually just a young Anglophile. But thanks to a video posted on Facebook the other day by RetroArt. It seems like some elements of The Avengers crept into real life.

Or is it actually real life elements being brought into that series? As this film for the amazing anti-thief security case was released on December 18,1961. So says at the very least, the British Pathe website.

It bears mentioning that John Steed didn’t start wearing his trademark attire until the 1962 season of The Avengers. Previously he actually wore a trenchcoat and acted as an assistant to Dr. David Keel (Ian Hendry). Beginning in 1962 with a rotating trio of partners – Steed began to dress the part of the gentleman.
Avengers

Now make sure to hop on over to British Pathe site for the full “Beat the Bandit” video. In addition to learning things like the briefcase was named the “arrestor”. You will also see how well a steel lined bowler stands up to be driven over by a car.

Now that you’ve witnessed the inventions of 1961 possibly affecting The Avengers series. Why not take a moment and enjoy Macnee and his co-star, Honor Blackman’s “Kinky Boots” from 1964?

[Via] Lord Skytower

Jack Kirby’s THE PRISONER!

Jack Kirby's THE PRISONER!

You all remember when Marvel and Jack Kirby turned cult TV show The Prisoner into a comic book, don’t you? No? That isn’t surprising, this unfinished seventeen-page story was scrapped before release in late 1976. Expected to be the first in a series, it was created by Kirby and partially inked and lettered by Mike Royer, and this single episode is all that remains of Kirby’s plans for the series.

Jack Kirby's THE PRISONER!

For more about the comic, and to read the first story, check out Forces of Geek, and if you want an even more in-depth history, check out TwoMorrows Publishing.

The Prisoner Artwork By Craig C. Cermak II!


I can assure you that what this world needs is a lot more awesome artwork featuring Patrick McGoohan as the Prisoner, or Number 6 depending on how you look at it I reckon. This wonderful artwork is by Craig C. Cermak II and he did it for his Father’s Birthday.
“The Prisoner” TV Show piece done for my dad’s birthday today. I always draw him something from a TV series or band he’s a big fan of, which is mostly 60’s related, so it’s enjoyable to draw. He constantly tells me to watch the show, and I swear one day I will, just haven’t gotten around to it yet.

The Prisoner By Jack Kirby

A huge tip of the hat to Mister 8 or Armstrong Sabian as he is known is some circles…but being a double agent…I probably shouldn’t have just given his name. I bet SPECTRE or THRUSH are already on his trail as I type this, let us hope that the writer of that wonderful blog has another identity he can switch to on the fly.

Make sure to follow the link to the Mister 8 blog so that you can see more art from the many times the Patrick McGoohan television classic, The Prisoner, almost made it to the comic spinners in your youth and details on how in 1988 it finally did. I’ve chosen a few scanned panels of the Marvel Comics abandoned comic by the legendary Jack Kirby, inked by Mike Royer for your viewing enjoyment.