Freakies Cereal Commercial (1974)

Thanks to the Great American Cereal Book I’ve learned that in my youth I missed out on what might have been the most awesome cereal ever*. Freakies!


[Via] Planet-Q!’s Flickr Page!

[Via] CapNSkull over on YouTube

Freakies cereal was released by Ralston in 1972 and taken too early from the shelves in 1976. Two more flavors were released in the cereal line, in 1973 with Cocoa Freakies and in 1975 with Fruity Freakies. The Freakies did make a comeback in 1987 with a new cereal and this time they were cast as space aliens.

From the all-knowing Wikipedia: “The Freakies were made up of seven creatures named Hamhose, Gargle, Cowmumble, Grumble, Goody-Goody, Snorkeldorf and the leader BossMoss. In the mythology of the Freakies, the seven went in search of the legendary Freakies Tree which grew the Freakies cereal. They found the Tree, realized the legend was true, and promptly took up residence in the Tree which then became the backdrop for all the TV spots and package back stories.”

Just a little fun cinematic fact, apparently Tom Hanks can be seen eating from a box of Freakies in the often overlooked classic The ‘Burbs.

So what do you think, friends? Is it time for the Freakies to make another comeback?

*Everyone knows that Boo Berry is the greatest cereal ever made.

The Great American Cereal Book: How Breakfast Got Its Crunch

I certainly love movies. I really like Video Games. I’m a fiend when it comes to Beef Jerky, but I also have an unnatural and possibly unhealthy appetite for breakfast cereal. So when our friends over at Abrams Image sent me a copy of the Great American Cereal Book to review, I grabbed one of my six remaining boxes of Boo Berry cereal and sat myself down for a morning’s worth of proper reading!


[Via] Abrams Image

The two authors of this fine tome, Marty Gitlin and Topher Ellis, are worthy chroniclers for my favorite breakfast food. In 368 pages they delve into the history of cereal from 1863 to 2010, with 350 color illustrations of box art and advertisements. Along the way they tackle the history of Cap’N Crunch as well as the Trix Rabbit plus they kindly include a few of the toys that we use to covet in our youths.

For example, do you remember when you could cut out records on the back of Sugar Crisp cereal boxes and listen to the likes of the Archies or Bobby Sherman?!

One of my favorite photos that Marty and Topher have included just so happens to be on page 130 and showcases the Super Sugar Crisps box advertising those fantastic Universal Monsters posters I’ve talked about once or twice on this site.

With each cereal entry they break it down by who released the cereal, when it was released and date that it ceased being produced, the main ingredients, the lineage of the cereal (What it might have been called before), varieties of the cereal, the cereals that might be “related”, spokescharacters, slogans, and facts on the cereal.

One of the greatest joys I’ve experienced reading the book was recalling cereals from my youth that I had for some reason completely forgotten about or in a lot of cases the cereals that I was too young to enjoy before they were pulled from the shelfs, like Wackies Cereal!

The Great American Cereal Book will hit store shelves in February and will retail for $19.95 and I hope you’ll make sure to pick up a copy because it’s an incredibly fun read and stroll through memory lane. Just make sure to have a bowl of cereal at hand, you’ll certainly get hungry while reading it!

The Great American Cereal Book: How Breakfast Got Its Crunch [via] Amazon