DC Heroes Plaster Molds

DC Heroes Plaster Molds

A long time ago, I was living in Pittsburgh and worked at a store adjacent to the infamous (Dawn of the Dead) Monroeville Mall. I had a girlfriend and… what’s that? You don’t believe I had a girlfriend? Sheesh, I know my face can curdle milk, but gimme a break! Anyway…

One day, we were at the mall and I spotted this nifty plaster casting set by Toybiz. It was the DC Heroes Plaster Molds. I had to have it! She was too good to me and she wound up getting it for me with a credit card meant for college stuff or emergencies.
DC Heroes Plaster Molds

Well, superhero stuff – including the DC Heroes Plaster Molds is an emergency to some collectors. Am I right? Oh brother, she couldn’t wait to strangle my dumb neck, right after her mom strangled hers!

The DC Heroes Plaster Molds set consists of four characters: Batman, Robin, Superman and Joker. Joker is not a hero, but he was the villain in Tim Burton’s Batman film. That’d be my guess as to why he’s included. ToyBiz probably figured it would lure kids and dim bulbs like me. Yep. It worked.

The figures were well sculpted and with the two piece molds, you could make your very own copies to paint (the set includes a small selection of paints and brush) or decorate.
DC Heroes Plaster Molds - Paints and Plaster

If you want to use the set, it’s great for the collector and if you’ve got got kids or nieces/nephews, it’s a great arts & crafts activity for a rainy day. Are you hunting for the set? It’s usually selling from $50 to $100 depending on the condition on eBay.

[Via] All Lucky Seven

Super Steins

Super Steins!

Did you ever wonder where the art for a product came from? It can be created specifically for the product or be art that gets re-purposed. I submit to you my personal sleuthing to solve a question I had, regarding the 1974 Thermo-Serve Batman Super Stein.

The Super Steins were released by Thermo-Serve in 1974 and the available characters were Wonder Woman, Batman, Shazam and Superman. At some point, my sister and I received a Wonder Woman and Batman Stein. You can figure out who got what. A great selection of art. An iconic full figure illustration by of Batman racing across a field with a full moon overhead. The other side sports Batman punching out a noodnik! “WHOK!” Ok, where did the art come from?

Super Steins

Aha! Time to dig into my comic book library. But first, I must flip up the head on my Shakespeare statue and hit the button!

The full figure Batman art was somewhat easy to identify. It’s by Neal Adams and is the cover art to a large format Treasury Edition comic. But, that’s not the complete origin,as that image is a variation of Neal’s Caped Crusader, in Batman 251. In that comic, Bats is missing his utility belt and the background is different. Still, an iconic Bat piece!

Now, to figure out the smaller artwork, which looked like long time Bat artist, Jim Aparo’s work. Aparo worked on many Bat books, so I had some perusing to do. Using 1974 or earlier, I had my bracket of books to look from. I couldn’t place the image, but was determined to figure it out. Mainly, because I’m a dork!

“WHOK!”

I found it in an issue of “Brave & the Bold.” Number 115, to be exact. Batman teams up with the Atom in “The Corpse that Wouldn’t Die!” A great story in which Batman is grazed by a bullet and rendered brain dead. The Atom shrinks and operates Batman’s body from inside, racing from synapse to synapse and animating him. Well, looking at the panel and comparing it to the Stein, they changed the dialogue in the word ballon and kept the “WHOK!”

I have yet to determine the origins of the other Super Stein artwork. Maybe I will try again in the future. I recently asked my sister if she knew about her Wonder Woman Stein and she punched me for being a dork!

Ok, I deserved that, I guess. Sheesh!

If you know the other art origins on the Super Steins, please comment and we’ll super sleuth the heck out of this!!

While it has nothing to do with Super Steins, why not listen to Denny O’Neil discuss both Batman and Neal Adams?

Ethel Merman

In 1979 Ethel Merman Performed Disco On Kids Are People Too?

While this post is certainly about Ethel Merman and her foray into the disco craze. It was in fact brought about thanks to finding this ad in a 1979 TV Guide. For the 1972 to 1982 Saturday Morning variety show, Kids Are People Too.

[Via] Howie Zeidman
Ethel Merman

Sadly I’ve not been lucky enough to find any of that Christopher Reeve segment online. Although at the very least we do have the Ethel Merman disco rendition of Alexander’s Ragtime Band! I am afraid however that you will have to follow the link here to see that particular TV broadcast. Having said that I am happy to say that you can see her perform the same number on this segment of Johnny Carson.

[Via] Alan Eichler

Read: Speaking of Christopher Reeve, Check Out This 1978 Behind The Scenes Photo From Superman!

I will admit that we use the term legendary a little too freely these days. However in regards to Ethel Merman there is no other way to describe the woman. Born Ethel Agnes Zimmerman in 1908 – of course she swore it was 1912. Ethel Merman ended up altering her name because of fears it wouldn’t fit on a marquee very easily. Merman found success thanks to her comedic style, bold and strong character, as well as her iconic voice.

[Via] Congobeat

Ethel Merman started making a name for herself after performing as a singer for Jimmy Durante. In fact the two would form a lifelong bond of friendship from this working experience.

Read: You Might Recall The Jimmy Durante Character From Crispy Critters Cereal

Soon she became a Broadway star after appearing in the Gershwin musical Girl Crazy in 1930. A role that audiences and critics took notice of – not to mention running for 272 performances. Although she would appear in numerous movies and TV shows throughout her life, it was most certainly Broadway where she reigned supreme.

Ethel Merman - Disco Album
In 1979, at the ripe old age of seventy-one, Ethel was naturally still going strong. Which is when of course she decided to release The Ethel Merman Disco Album. Featuring seven songs that she was well known for:

  • There’s No Business Like Show Business
  • Everything’s Coming Up Roses
  • I Get a Kick Out of You
  • Something for the Boys
  • Some People
  • Alexander’s Ragtime Band
  • I Got Rhythm

It has been said that Ethel literally recorded all seven songs for the album – in one take each. The disco arraingement was added in afterwards, which might have resulted in the rather negative reviews. I can’t speak to any of that as perhaps I just love Ethel Merman too much to care?

[Via] Thierry Alexandre

Golden Age Superman

This free Golden Age Superman Comic is absolutely stunning

Adrien van Viersen is a lifelong Superman Fan and storyboard artist with some nice superhero bonafides. He has done work on X2, X3, Game of Thrones, and The Flash. This week though he turned he released a project about Golden Age Superman. It is a wonderfully written and well-illustrated take on the Man of Steel set during 1930’s. How did Superman get his golden age costume? Why does Clark Kent wear glasses? Adrien spins a wonderful tale with delightful artistry that cries out to be printed. Want a peak? Check out this trailer for the work.

Golden Age Superman Comic Trailer

Looks pretty good right? So where do you get your hands on this free comic?

The comic is available from Adrien van Viersen for free and comes in standard comic book and mobile formatting. I have read it multiple times and the think I come away with both times is that this story has heart. It also captures the innocence that we often project into the golden age era with just a hint of modern sensibilities.

While I am satisfied with this as a one-shot. It left me wanting A LOT more. Now that I have seen Kent transform into Superman, I need to know what happens next and I am sure you will feel the same. So head on over to van Viersen’s site and download a copy and make sure you tell your friends. Supporting works like this can give brave storytellers a chance to work with an iconic brand.

And if you like what you see, van Viersen has a blog. It is filled with Easter Eggs from the comic and fun facts about his reasoning, inspiration and fandom.