Star Trek Shuttlecraft Tent

Boldy Go Camping In This Star Trek Shuttlecraft Tent

For those of you that are stout enough to survive the harshness of the elements and go camping. Why not put a retro spin to your tent of choice? In fact make it a Star Trek Shuttlecraft tent!
Star Trek Shuttlecraft - Next Generation

Now I will certainly be the first to admit that my Star Trek knowledge isn’t all-encompassing. While I am more familiar with the original Star Trek series. I did however retain some info thanks to those long and lonely nights of my youth. For example the Star Trek Shuttlecraft tent appears to be based on the Mark 6 version. Which was also a modified version of the updated Galileo shuttles.
Star Trek Shuttlecraft - Galileo

Moreover you can see that very type of shuttlecraft in action in 1989’s The Final Frontier!

These Are The Voyages

In addition, here is a fun fact. I actually am one of the outcasts that really likes The Final Frontier. Now of course that you’ve learned I obviously have no taste in film. I think it best to get to the point of this article, the Star Trek Shuttlecraft tent.

Star Trek Shuttlecraft Tent - Front

Images courtesy of David Delisle.

The sad news is you cannot purchase this. It is in fact the brainchild of Dave Delisle. From his site he shares that originally this design was intended for a bunk bed. When you get a moment go vist his Geeky Ideas website. Which besides the tent also presents all manner of creative inventions. Case in point this Stanley Cup playoff bracket, inspired of course by 1984’s The Karate Kid.

Image courtesy of David Delisle.


Furthermore, David’s Star Trek Shuttlecraft Tent could be rolled up and carried in it’s thrusters!


Star Trek Shuttlecraft Tent - Thrusters

Image courtesy of David Delisle.

So while you crafty do-it-yourselfer’s figure out how to make this a reality. I offer you up this YouTube video from TrekWorks featuring the restoration of the original Galileo shuttle.

Canada Beams Up More Interstellar Star Trek Postage!

A quick update, just in case you were in cryogenic suspension: last year (2016) was the 50th anniversary of Star Trek. You might just have missed the massive conventions featuring top-line guests who had never done the Star Trek convention circuit before. You might just have missed the glut of cool merchandise, mammoth Blu-Ray releases, and the latest movie in the franchise.
Trek Postage

You might also have missed some stamps. The U.S. Postal Service graced the anniversary with a set of stamps that seemed to be trying to pay homage to the colorful ‘60s origins of Star Trek rather than to its beloved characters. They were…abstract…to say the least. Now Canada’s stamps? Canada had the best Star Trek postage stamps – basically, they had the stamps I wished we had gotten in the States.

If you’re wondering about the unusual spread of characters covered on the sheet of five Canadian Star Trek postage stamps from 2016, bear in mind that three of the five actors – William Shatner, James Doohan, and John Colicos – were born in Canada! Non-Canadian-born Leonard Nimoy and DeForest Kelley were included because, well, there would’ve been riots in the streets if Spock and Bones had been left off of the 50th anniversary stamp set.

Canada Post apparently knows when it’s got a very happy customer base, because it has just announced “Star Trek: Year 2” stamp sets, this time concentrating on the five TV captains that the franchise has put on our screens so far: Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Janeway, and Archer. (Sorry, no Chris Pine, modern Trek movie fans.)
Trek Postage

The new set of stamps is being offered in every form from a lavish booklet, to first-day covers, to framed sheets.
Trek Postage - Sheets

The best part of all? Canada Post does ship to the United States, quite happily.

As we’re all waiting for a new Star Trek series (to be filmed, incidentally, in Canada) that seems like it might fade into vaporware in an alien atmosphere, Canada Post is keeping fans happy by not limiting the celebration to 2016. (And the 2016 stamp sets are still available.)

V'ger - Star Trek the Motion Picture

Retroist Scoreboard 3-14-17: V’ger, you’re my knight in shining armor

Soundtrack fans, we’re in yet another unexpectedly meaty week of wonders, so let’s waste no time in diving right in.

La-La Land Records, as previously announced, is now taking orders for their limited edition (1500 copies) double LP vinyl pressing of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, returning Jerry Goldsmith’s magnum opus to turntables for the first time in nearly 40 years, this time with the complete score spread across four sides. (The CD box set has even more music, if you’re after music instead of a display piece: Goldsmith scored half the movie before coming up with the iconic Enterprise theme, which was later repurposed as the theme for Star Trek: The Next Generation, and the CD edition presents the complete score as heard in the movie plus what basically amounts to an unused alternate soundtrack.)
V'ger

While the first Star Trek movie is returning to vinyl, another classic movie is, incredibly, only just now making its way to CD thanks to Varese Sarabande, which is presenting Dave Grusin’s music from On Golden Pond, interspersed with dialogue from the movie (in some cases, quite lengthy chunks of dialogue).

Varese also has a trio of limited editions now available: an “encore” re-pressing of Elmer Bernstein’s score from Disney’s The Black Cauldron, limited to just 1000 copies for those who missed out on the last limited edition issue of this title.

For fans of high-octane action movies (and their music), there’s a new edition of Basil Poledouris’ music from the Steven Segal flick Under Siege 2: Dark Territory, more than doubling the running time of the original 1995 CD release. Even the movie’s source music is included as bonus tracks. What’s source music? Ask me that again in a minute.

And finally, John Williams’ score from the 1990’s Stanley & Iris gets a limited edition CD release of 3,000 copies, but that’s not all: tucked into the open space left by that movie’s score is a second Williams score hitting CD for the first time, 1972’s Pete ‘n’ Tillie. The two movies’ music are a good fit to share a CD: both are heartfelt relationship movies, and hey, it’s John Williams.

So…about source music: it’s a wonderful thing when original source music winds up as a bonus track on a CD…of course, that’s assuming that the director isn’t married to his temp track. Confused yet? That’s why we have another slice of the Retroist Scoreboard Glossary this week.

The Retroist Scoreboard Glossary: How The Sausage Gets Made
Additional Music – you’ll see this in movie and especially TV credits these days…often in small print. Particularly with the breakneck production timetable of television, but also with movies, composers must hire extra help to ghost-write the sheer amount of music needed within that timetable. Some of today’s biggest names were yesterday’s up-and-coming “additional music” composers: the ubiquitous Bear McCreary (10 Cloverfield Lane, The Walking Dead, Agents Of SHIELD, Outlander, Black Sails, Da Vinci’s Demons) got his break composing “additional music” for the 2003 Battlestar Galactica miniseries, whose primary composer moved on, leaving McCreary to take over the hourly series, making his career in the process. Due to the structure of CD release contracts with the primary composer, this additional music may or may not appear on an official release, leaving music from memorable scenes off the table. (Thus was the fate of the pivotal, Joel Goldsmith-composed “Flight Of The Phoenix” scene from Star Trek: First Contact, which was left off of the original 1996 soundtrack release at the label’s demand, simply because it wasn’t by primary composer Jerry Goldsmith.) In a few cases, the assistant composers may release their material as a composer promo.

Music+FX Track or Stem – a special mix of a movie or TV show’s music score and sound effects, prepared so that local voice artists in various parts of the world can do a language dub without the original actors’ voices in the background. Particularly with older films, this may be the closest we come to having a film’s original music tapes; it’s exceedingly rare to see a CD release of a Music+FX mix, but not unheard of (i.e. La-La Land’s “archival” release of Jerry Goldsmith’s rare score from The Satan Bug). Music+FX mixes are more often the domain of bootleggers.

Source Music – composers may be called upon to create “source music” for a scene in which a movie’s characters can hear that song in question from some on-screen source – a radio, a jukebox, a band on stage, to name a few examples. (Contrast this against the movie’s score, which the characters do not hear.) Some reissue producers go out of their way to include specially composed source music, particularly if it’s been the subject of “what was that song…?” debates for years and years. In some cases, source music is a piece of music from a movie’s songtrack.

Spotting – a process during pre-production of a movie or TV show in which the composer sits in on a screening of a rough edit to discuss the timing, placement and emotional thrust of the music with the director and/or editor(s), sometimes using temp tracks as a guide. (These meetings are called spotting sessions.) Once spotting is complete, the process of composing actually begins, though some composers may discover at a very late stage that the director’s ideas on spotting has changed, and their music has been tracked over a completely different scene…or has been replaced with a piece of the temp track.

Temp Track – a “temporary track” is often assembled, during a movie’s editing process, by the director and/or the film editor to track scenes in a movie that has no score yet. Temp tracks are often cobbled together from classical pieces or other movie soundtracks, and a composer hired to score a movie will often be asked to compose music with a similar feel…without actually duplicating it note-for-note, of course. The history of film music is rife with instances of directors falling in love with their temp tracks to the point that they either don’t hire a composer, or reject a specially commissioned score when it doesn’t live up to the director’s expectations (perhaps the most famous specimen of this category being Alex North’s unused original score for 2001: a space odyssey). Temp tracks are controversial in film music, whether for the perception that they limit a composer’s creativity, or for the not-limited-to-Kubrick phenomenon which plagues composers to this day (just this year, Johann Johannson’s score for Arrival was disqualified from Oscar contention because of the prominence of Max Richter’s composition, “On The Nature Of Daylight”, in key scenes of the movie – a holdover from the temp track that the director felt couldn’t be improved upon, costing his composer a nomination).

Tracking – once a composer has turned in a completed score, that music is at the mercy of the film’s director and/or editor(s), and may not appear where it was originally spotted. The music may be chopped up, edited and tracked in a different place entirely, such as >em>Star Wars Episode IStar Wars Episode III. Additionally, licensed or specially commissioned songs may be tracked into scenes, replacing sections of more traditional scoring (Ray Parker Jr.’s memorable song was tracked into as many scenes of Ghostbusters as possible late in editing, leaving significant portions of Elmer Bernstein’s score on the cutting room floor).

Logistics

Retro Records: Star Trek – The Logistics Of Stampede (1975)

Welcome back, friends. To a new installment for Retro Records featuring 1975’s Star Trek: The Logistics of Stampede. Another one of those fantastic Power Records offerings – which of course allowed all manner of famous writers to tell abridged tales. Case in point with The Logistics of Stampede which so happens to have been penned by Alan Dean Foster.

Foster is pretty well known for writing numerous novelizations for films. Alien, Star Wars, Alien Nation, The Thing, Star Trek and many more. As well as his own standalone novels like Cat-a-lyst, Cyberway, and Slipt to name a few.

Power Records was of course a spinoff label so to speak of Peter Pan Records. One that was geared towards an older audience. Moreover this is why we saw Power Records book and records fare featuring Kojak, Planet of the Apes and Star Trek.

Which brings us to this offering for Retro Records. The Logistics of Stampede finds Kirk, Bones, and Spock beaming down to Ribol II. An agricultural planet that is in fact facing destruction of their precious crops by Dranzers. A cow-like beast that every six years becomes overpopulated and then stampedes across the plains. Destroying seventy to ninety percent of the grain crops!

Can our trio of heroes come up with a solution to halt the Dranzers? Can they protect the grain on Ribol II – which in addition helps to feed other planets in the Federation? Let’s find out as we listen to The Logistics of Stampede on Retro Records!
Logistics

[Via] Doctor Del

Having listened to The Logistics of Stampede perhaps you now need more Star Trek goodness?


Well, in this case how about the great and late Leonard Nimoy’s cover of Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love To Town? Which might be better known from Kenny Roger’s take back in 1969 – written by Mel Tillis of all people.

[Via] Soren123

Listen Long

Retroist Scoreboard: Listen Long And Prosper

Soundtrack fans, there’s one major release this week, and a couple of real retro gems, but let’s face it, the big news is a big box set that’s been eagerly awaited for years. We’ll talk about that release and then give it some context in a moment.

From Dragon’s Domain Records comes a pair of releases that’ll tickle your retro gene: the Harry Manfredini (Friday The 13th, Swamp Thing) score from 1995’s Timemaster (possibly the only film in history to feature Pat “Mr. Miyagi” Morita, Michael “Worf” Dorn, and Zelda Rubenstein of Poltergeist fame in the same movie). Not retro enough for you? Then rewind to 1979 for the soundtrack from the David Cronenberg racing movie Fast Company, a film that was so ’70s that John Saxon was required by federal law to be in the cast. (Okay, just kidding about that, but John Saxon was in it.) The music, ironically, is by Fred and Larry Mollin; you’ll remember Fred Mollin from his music for Friday The 13th: The Series. Dragon’s Domain is a very small label renowned for its deep dives into cinematic obscurity, so both releases are capped at 1,000 copies each. The first 100 copies of each title, both of which ship on March 13th but are being pre-ordered now, will be autographed by their respective composers.

Now let’s roll back to 1995 – the same year Timemaster hit theaters – and simultaneously fast-forward to the 24th century.
Listen Long

La-La Land is launching (from spacedock, no doubt) a 4-CD set of music from all seven season of Star Trek: Voyager, a release that was first announced a couple of years back. That being said, the Voyager box set isn’t really “late”, per se. This $59.98, 4-CD set includes highlights from the episodes Rise, Night, Equinox Parts I & II, Pathfinder, Spirit Folk, The Haunting Of Deck Twelve, Shattered, The Void, The 37s, Basics Parts I & II, The Q and the Gray, Concerning Flight, Tinker Tenor Doctor Spy, Workforce Parts I & II, and the complete scores from the episodes Dark Frontier Parts I & II, Lifesigns, Scorpion Parts I & II, and The Year Of Hell Parts I & II. Wondering where the action-and-Borg-packed series finale, Endgame, is? La-La Land is holding it for the second volume of Voyager music to be released next year. La-La Land rolls out its Star Trek box sets at a slow rate, both so that one property doesn’t take up their entire release schedule, and as a mercy to Star Trek music fans on a budget.

Of course, that Star Trek music fans even need a reprieve between releases is a mind-boggling thought to those of us who are old enough to remember when Trek soundtracks were exceedingly scarce.

The first Star Trek music that was available to the public was 1979’s Jerry Goldsmith’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture soundtrack, released alongside the movie itself as a single LP clocking in at around the traditional 40-minute mark for vinyl soundtracks. Prior to that release, the only Star Trek listening material was the 1976 spoken-word LP Inside Star Trek, and Power Records’ library of Star Trek audio stories for children, sometimes accompanied by a read-along book. It was exceedingly rare for anything on TV to get its own soundtrack album at the time; a compilation of TV theme tunes wasn’t unheard of, but an entire soundtrack? Television shows and TV movies couldn’t afford the large orchestras of feature films…who would want to listen to that?

In 1986, GNP Crescendo and a few other labels decided to find out. That year happened to be the 20th anniversary of the original Star Trek, which had been revived in movie form more successfully than anyone could have expected. A fourth movie was due in late 1986, the series began to be available commercially on VHS tapes containing two episodes each, and Trek was once again very visible. If there was a time to test the waters of the soundtrack scene to see if TV music would be welcomed, this was as safe a time as any.

Three labels released a quintet of releases tied to the music of the original series. Label X and Varese Sarabande each published two albums of re-recorded music assembling highlights of the original series’ most familiar music, now played by a far larger orchestra than the original Trek could ever afford. But small label GNP Crescendo – founded in the 1940s by Gene Norman for his own easy-listening output – took the bold step of releasing the original recordings as heard on TV in the 1960s. With tape recovery and restoration methods being in their infancy in 1986, the result was an album that presented, with somewhat tinny sound, nearly the complete scores from the two Star Trek pilot episodes, The Cage and Where No One Has Gone Before. Norman’s son, sci-fi/Star Trek fan Neil Norman, spearheaded that effort, and managed to wrest from Paramount the release rights for those episode scores in perpetuity, an almost unimaginable situation now – and a demonstration of how far low a priority TV soundtrack music was at the time. In 1988, GNP Crescendo followed this up with a CD containing roughly 2/3 of the score from the Star Trek: The Next Generation premiere, Encounter At Farpoint, which was also a brisk seller among Trek fans. Obviously, the Star Trek music library had merit.

Over the next few years, GNP Crescendo continued releasing music from classic Trek and Star Trek: TNG, along with soundtracks for the premiere episodes of Deep Space Nine and Voyager, and took over as the de facto Star Trek label for the movies as well, beginning with Star Trek: Generations. The turn of the century saw a downturn in interest in Star Trek, however: the movies featuring the TNG cast had become a poster child for diminishing box office returns, and ratings after the premiere of Star Trek: Enterprise seemed to indicate that the audience was tiring of the saga. The Enterprise soundtrack was released by Decca Records (the label of singer Russell Watson, the voice of Enterprise’s love-it-or-hate-it theme song), while Varese Sarabande released the soundtrack from 2002’s Star Trek: Nemesis. Enterprise was cancelled in 2005, the first Trek series in 18 years not to go to seven seasons, and the Trek franchise disappeared into a cocoon at the studio, re-emerging as a movie reboot in 2009. Varese once again released the soundtrack for the new movies.

But the re-emergence of Star Trek as a viable media entity also coincided with the appointment of a new head of Paramount Pictures’ music department, Randy Spendlove. A veteran producer who had worked in the studio with U2, Beyonce, and Linkin Park, Spendlove was in charge of licensing music from the various TV and film properties at Paramount. By this point, soundtrack boutique labels such as Film Score Monthly, Intrada and La-La Land Records had sprung up, and with them, a collectors’ market that now wanted to own the complete scores of their favorite movies and shows, not just the 40-or-so minutes that had become the industry standard (and was, in part, dictated by musicians’ union rules on re-use). Unlike his predecessors, Spendlove was more than happy to hold discussions with these labels regarding the musical gems in the Paramount vaults. The first result of this was Film Score Monthly’s releases of the complete Star Trek II and Star Trek III scores.

As of 2009, there were 12 CDs in total featuring original music from the various Trek TV series – three from classic Trek, four from TNG, one each from Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise, and two “multi-series” Best Of Star Trek releases from GNP Crescendo. The next two releases of Star Trek TV music more than tripled the number of CDs available from the franchise’s television entries. 2010 saw Film Score Monthly’s release of a gargantuan 14-disc box set collecting almost all of composer Ron Jones’ music from Star Trek: TNG. With the sole exception of the two-part The Best Of Both Worlds, which GNP Crescendo had released on CD in 1991, the box set gave fans of TNG’s standout composer every note that he had recorded during his four-year stint on the show. Two years later, not to be outdone, La-La Land issued a 15-CD box set that put every note ever recorded for the 1960s Star Trek series in the hands of fans, all freshly remastered from the original session tapes. (Since GNP Crescendo had rights in perpetuity to the handful of episodes whose music they had released on CD, La-La Land had to sublicense some of the music on the set from them, at no small expense.)

In three years, we’d gone from 12 CDs of Star Trek TV music to 41 CDs. Since then, La-La Land, in addition to pleasing fans by delivering a long-overdue 3-CD complete version of the 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture score that started it all, has released two box sets each of scores from Enterprise and non-Ron-Jones music from Star Trek: TNG, as well as one box set each from Deep Space Nine and, now, Voyager (both of those spinoffs will receive a further box set release). GNP Crescendo, picking up on the hunger for Trek TV music, has reissued two of its TNG soundtracks in complete and remastered form (Encounter At Far Point and The Best Of Both Worlds), as well as complete versions of the three Trek movie soundtracks they issued in the ’90s (Generations, First Contact, Insurrection). Intrada pitched in to re-release Star Trek IV, V and VI in complete and remastered form.

Just in time for Christmas 2016, La-La Land released a 4-CD box set of highlights from classic Trek, as well as oft-requested fan favorites from TNG, Deep Space Nine, and Voyager, and – for the first time – the complete reconstructed music library from Filmation’s early 1970s animated Star Trek.

Later this year, La-La Land will release another box set, rounding out the music of Deep Space Nine, with a second Voyager set due this time in 2018. 2018 will end with a final Star Trek box set featuring odds and ends from all of the series that didn’t make it into the other box sets – and at that point, according to La-La Land’s head honcho, M.V. Gerhard, the label is calling its trek through Star Trek’s music vaults done…unless, of course, their current negotiations to land the rights to release music from Star Trek: Discovery are successful.

Not counting the various movie soundtracks and their own expanded reissues, by the end of next year, there will be as many CDs’ worth of Star Trek television music as there were episodes of the original series – 79 total. Rewinding to 1986, when it was a huge roll of the dice to put out a television soundtrack at all, the thought of 79 CDs’ worth of music from any franchise, either film or television, is mind-boggling. (Add all the movie soundtracks’ multi-disc reissues to that 79, and you arrive at an even 100. 100 CDs’ worth of Star Trek music. If you can get your head around that idea.)

Furthermore, the success of the Star Trek soundtracks has emboldened the soundtrack labels who have access to the music of other television shows: The X-Files, Batman: The Animated Series, the original Mission: Impossible, 1970s Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers In The 25th Century, Jonny Quest, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, Rat Patrol, 1980s Twilight Zone, Lost In Space, and even relative obscurities such as the 1960s series Then Came Bronson have all gotten box set treatment (in some cases, multiple box sets) now that the soundtrack labels know there’s a market for such a thing. You have Star Trek’s enduring appeal and ardent fan base, and risk takers like Neil Norman, Film Score Monthly’s Lukas Kendall, and even Randy Spendlove at Paramount, to thank for the current healthy ecosystem for classic TV soundtracks.

Next week: more music, and the first entries in a basic glossary for soundtrack collectors.

When he’s not keeping score at the Retroist, Earl Green is the founder, head writer and podcaster-in-chief at the LogBook.com, a site devoted in roughly equal parts to classic sci-fi, classic video games, classic soundtracks, and space history. You can catch him lining up carefully curated excerpts from TV, movie and game scores most months on the Log Book’s soundtrack mixtape podcast, In The Grand Theme Of Things.