DuckTales - Retroist Scoreboard

The Retroist Scoreboard: DuckTales the Movie And More 2/8/2017

There’s a whole cottage industry surrounding the release of classic TV and movie soundtracks out there that you may not know about. Small labels, usually limited by musicians’ union rules to a releasing only 3,000 or so copies of a given title, unearth classic soundtracks that have often never been issued on CD before, or have only had a CD release featuring about half of the music that was included in the movie. Labels like Intrada, La-La Land Records, Perseverance, and Quartet Records release a steady stream of classic TV and movie scores throughout the year…and the Retroist Scoreboard is here to let you know what’s just dropped.

Intrada gets bragging rights this week with the first-time-ever-on-CD release of the complete score from 1990s DuckTales: The Movie, composed by David Newman (later of The Mighty Ducks, The Phantom, Galaxy Quest, Serenity, and many others). Weighing in at nearly the maximum possible length of an audio CD, it isn’t just that DuckTales hasn’t been on CD before, it’s never been released before in any form other than a couple of excerpts featured on a 1990 Disney compilation CD, The Disney Afternoon. Disney animation fans are ecstatic about this one, to say the least.
DuckTales - Retroist Scoreboard

As new titles are introduced, old ones sell out or are retired; Intrada is giving everyone until February 13th to buy the last remaining copies of the soundtracks from Disney’s Unidentifed Flying Oddball (1979, known to UK audiences as The Spaceman & King Arthur) and a two-fer CD with the Laurence Rosenthal scores from 1976’s Return Of A Man Called Horse and the 1999 TV movie remake of Inherit The Wind.

La-La Land Records has just released the score from the 1993 Sylvester Stallone flick Cliffhanger, scored by Trevor Jones (Excalibur, Time Bandits, The Dark Crystal, Labyrinth, Notting Hill, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen). As is often the case with La-La Land’s released, the first disc of the 2-CD set is the complete score (including never before heard tracks), while the second is a remastered reissue of the original 1993 album.

A gaggle of past La-La Land releases are about to go out of print forever, including David Newman’s The Phantom (1996), Tangerine Dream’s score from Wavelength (1983), a lavish 2-CD set of Alfred Newman’s A Certain Smile (1958), Mark Mancina’s score from 1995’s Money Train, Bill Conti’s score from I, The Jury (1982), Andrew Belling’s score from the 1977 Ralph Bakshi animated film Wizards, a selection of Brian Tyler’s music from the far more recent TV series Terra Nova, and a similar selection of music by Michael McCuistion, Lolita Ritmanis and Kristopher Carter from Batman: The Brave And The Bold. All of the retiring titles have been marked down while supplies last.

UK classical label Dutton Vocalian has jumped into the fray with a CD reissue of the original soundtrack album from Watership Down (1978), scored by Angela Morley (The Goon Show, Dynasty, Dallas), including the original album’s Art Garfunkel vocals and narration by Michael Hordern. The single disc is a hybrid SACD which is compatible with most garden-variety CD players, and for an import, it’s surprisingly affordable.

Looking further down the road, soundtrack specialty labels often let their customer base know if something is coming up that they might have to save up for. La-La Land – who has all but taken ownership of vintage Star Trek soundtrack releases in recent years – has announced that its first (yes, first) 4-CD box set of music from Star Trek: Voyager will land on February 28th. La-La Land’s Star Trek box sets tend to arrive at the $50-$60 price point, so start saving your quatloos now; they’ve tentatively scheduled a second box set of Deep Space Nine soundtracks for the third quarter of 2017, with a second Voyager box set hitting about a year from now, and what the label says will be its final Star Trek release, a 4-CD box set collecting fan-requested “leftovers” from Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise in late 2018.

Varese Sarabande has announced an April release date for the scores of all three of the original Mel Gibson Mad Max films on “sandy” vinyl, and they’re accepting pre-orders now.

Stay tuned to the Retroist Scoreboard…as new releases arrive, we’ll let you know what, and more importantly where, the score is.

When he’s not keeping score at the Retroist, Earl Green is the founder, head writer and podcaster-in-chief at theLogBook.com, a site devoted in roughly equal parts to classic sci-fi, classic video games, classic soundtracks, and space history. You can catch him lining up carefully curated excerpts from TV, movie and game scores most months on the Log Book’s soundtrack mixtape podcast, In The Grand Theme Of Things.

Got the Blade Runner Blues

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At the time of this writing I’ve been doing some chores around my house. Laundry, cleaning, organizing. I’ve had the Blade Runner soundtrack playing and this track is my favorite. It’s titled “Blade Runner Blues” by Vangelis. What a great piece of music. It’s perfect for the film.

It’s very noir but also sounds like it can be placed in 2019, the year the movie is set. After listening to it, I kind of want to head out to a cozy lounge and have a couple of cocktails.

Music from Close Encounters of the Third Kind

I found this in a local thrift store for only a buck and couldn’t pass it up. Although I do listen to vinyl records and often convert them to mp3s so I can listen to them in the car, I have to admit I bought this one at least as much for the artwork as I did for the record itself. I love the detail of the spaceship and of the lights below of the landing strip.

If there’s one thing that attracted aliens in the 1970s, it was air brushing.

Despite what they showed in the movie, there is no landing strip at the top of Devil’s Tower. Trust me. I checked.

Christine Soundtrack – Christine Attacks (Plymouth Fury)

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I love John Carpenter and Alan Howarth’s music from the movie, Christine. I am not sure when the film came out they released it as a soundtrack, but I do know that they made one available in the 1990s because that is when I picked it up at the Sam Goody at the local mall. The whole thing is pretty short, just a little over 30 minutes, but it’s very moody and very John Carpenter. The best song in my opinion is the track 12, “Christine Attacks (Plymouth Fury)”.

Moonlighting: The Soundtrack

I originally avoided Moonlighting. I thought it was a girl’s show. I think I thought the same thing about Remington Steele. But after Die Hard exposed me to the awesomeness that is Bruce Willis, I began checking out reruns on Lifetime. Yes, that’s right. I eventually started watching a TV show I had originally written off as a girl’s show on a girl’s channel. I’m not trying to justify or defend that. I’m just saying that’s the way it was.

While I’m sure that is how my relationship with the TV show Moonlighting played out, I’m less certain how my relationship with Moonlighting the sound track did.

I know I bought this on cassette at a local record store, and I know I listened to it often as I cruised around Columbus, Ohio in my 1979 Toyota Celica, but I’m not sure what I initially saw in it. My guess is that the hook was the Moonlighting theme by Al Jarreau.

However, I know I was pretty impressed by the fact that both Bruce Willis and Cybil Shepherd had tracks as well, and while I had forgotten which song Willis covered, I remembered Shepherd’s “I Told Ya I Love Ya, Now Get Out”. I didn’t remember the other songs as well, but you can see them listed on the album’s back cover.

The Moonlighting soundtrack was just one of the weird soundtracks I had at this time, sharing space in the little cassette cubbyhole of my car with the Sleepwalkers soundtrack, the Batman soundtrack, and Danny Elfman’s Music for a Darkened Theater. I really liked it because I thought it added another dimension to the show. Moonlighting was multi-media before multi-media was cool, and they held on to at least one more fan that way. If only Remington Steele had done the same.