Your Date is Here - Boardgame

Saturday Frights: Your Date Is Here (2017)

Hey there, Fright Fans! It has been quite some time since we’ve shared with you a new Saturday Frights. Not the podcast of course, I mean the best retro horror related or at least retro themed shorts and TV shows. Which is in fact exactly why we are sharing Your Date is Here, it’s not only an enjoyable short film but does have a retro connection. In this case that is Milton Bradley’s 1965 Mystery Date!

[Via] Lucy Huto

We have Zachary Paul from over at the Bloody Disgusting site, to thank for the heads up on the short film. Your Date is Here is a prime example why short films work so well. Much like why I have always loved the short stories of Stephen King and Richard Matheson. Horror or thrillers, sometimes can be the most enjoyable when it is simplest. Deliver enough story for a setup and then drop the scare.

Although if I am behind totally honest, Your Date is Here isn’t all that scary. Not that is makes it any less enjoyable of course. I found myself with a pretty big grin on my face throughout it’s almost 6 and a 1/2 minute run. The short delivers in spades with atmosphere, moreover a creeping unease that begins to permeate the story.
Your Date is here - No Eyes

What of that story? A Mother and her Daughter decide to play a board game one evening. To help pass the time while they wait for the pizza delivery man to arrive. The young girl takes an old game off a shelf called ‘Your Date is Here’. It doesn’t take long however before some odds things occur while playing the game…as well as the Mother noticing disturbing artwork in the game itself.
Your Date is Here - Date Card

Filmmakers Zak White as well as Todd Spence took an actual Mystery Date board game and altered it to their needs. Adding in all the creepy touches that makes the short so enjoyable. After watching Your Date is Here, make sure to hop on over to Bloody Disgusting, Zachary has an interview with Zak and Todd.

Now, dim the lights down, lean in closer to your monitor and enjoy Your Date is Here!

[Via] Midnight Video

Keeping Up with the Joneses – Women’s and Men’s Style

These two samples are from a series begun in September 1915 based on the Keeping Up with the Joneses newspaper comic by “Pop” Momand. The films begin with “out of the inkwell” drawings of the sort seen in Winsor McCay films and later elaborated by Max Fleischer. Like other comic strips and animated films of the era, notably Bringing Up Father (published from 1912; filmed 1916-18), Keeping Up with the Joneses features a husband oppressed by a wifes obsession with high society and consumer fashion. The series ended abruptly in February 1916 after its animator, Harry S. Palmer, lost a patent infringement suit brought by John Randolph Bray over the use of transparent celluloid sheets.

Cartoons! ..That never made it.

I am considering doing a regular series about pilot episodes of shows that never got picked up, and perhaps pilot episodes of shows we are familiar with, but wherein the pilot differed greatly from the resulting show. This concept of course brought to mind the old interstitial shorts on Cartoon Network (back when CN was still good) “Cartoons That Never Made It”, with the obvious difference being that the “Cartoons That Never Made It” “pilots” were never intended to be anything more than a joke. The “Salt & Slug” song and the “Heidi & the Yodellers” one still stick in my head to this very day.