Music from Close Encounters of the Third Kind

I found this in a local thrift store for only a buck and couldn’t pass it up. Although I do listen to vinyl records and often convert them to mp3s so I can listen to them in the car, I have to admit I bought this one at least as much for the artwork as I did for the record itself. I love the detail of the spaceship and of the lights below of the landing strip.

If there’s one thing that attracted aliens in the 1970s, it was air brushing.

Despite what they showed in the movie, there is no landing strip at the top of Devil’s Tower. Trust me. I checked.

Bullfrogs and Butterflies

Here’s another album I picked up over the weekend. Like many of the things I stockpile, it’s hard to definitively state what I do and don’t collect. I spend most of my time following the rather wispy guide of, “I know it when I see it.”

I distinctly remember this album from my childhood; just as strongly I can tell you, I didn’t own it. A quick Google search turned up that the “Bullfrogs and Butterflies” was a series of kid-friendly Christian albums from the late 70s/early 80s, released by AgapeLand. I am positive I didn’t personally own this record, but one of my friends must have. The closest I personally ever came to rocking with a bullfrog was with Jeremiah. He was a good friend of mine.

Again, I find myself just as attracted to the artwork as I am the kid-friendly tunes.

I always love a good washboard player. At least there ain’t no hole in the washtub.

Scooby Doo’s Exciting Christmas Stories

I found this album while out digging around in one of my normal haunts. The most interesting thing about this album is Scrappy Doo on the cover. Right below Scrappy it says “Copyright (c) 1978 Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc”. According to Wikipedia, Scrappy Doo made his first television appearance in 1979. I don’t know if this was the first appearance of Scrappy or not, but it’s definitely an early one. If anyone has any more information about the earliest appearance of Scrappy Doo, I would love to hear from you.

The album contains two stories, one per side: Trouble at Santa’s Workshop, and Mystery of the Missing Santa. All of the voice work was done by the original actors:

Daphne: Heather North
Freddie: Frank Welker
Scooby Doo: Don Messick
Shaggy: Casey Kasem
Velma: Pat Stevens

Fan of Scooby Doo? Why not check out the Retroist Scooby Doo podcast…

Super Girls Compilation LP

Yeah, we all remember Freedom Rock. But how many of us remember Super Girls?

This is the first TV-advertised compilation record I was ever aware of. It was also the first TV-advertised compilation record I ever physically saw. Somebody in the apartment complex we were living in at the time had this record. They played “Leader of the Pack” off it incessantly. I still think of this record today anytime I hear that song.

Being as young as I was, I didn’t understand the whole compilation thing. I didn’t realize that this was a collection of songs from different female artists and different era. I thought they were all contemporary songs performed by the girls on the cover. I thought those girls were the Super Girls and the songs were theirs. I also remember having a crush on one of the Super Girls and staring at her picture on the cover for hours, though I can’t remember now which one it was nor what it was that made her so attractive to me back then. I also thought they were holding lollipops on the cover, but maybe I confused that with The Chordettes “Lollipop” sampled on the commercial.

K-Tel masterpiece it’s not, but Super Girls still has a place in my childhood. A weird, misunderstood, and not completely welcome place, but a place nonetheless.