Let’s Play 1984’s The Temple Of Doom Board Game!

By the time that Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom hit theaters back on May 23, 1984. I was impatiently counting the days up until it’s release. When my Father and I finally had the chance to see it, I was all set to join Indiana Jones again and brave that Temple of Doom.

Film Trailers

Of course it helped that television ads were all over the place. It must be remembered as well that Raiders of the Lost Ark kind of took everyone by surprise in 1981. It seemed like the studio was truly doing its best to get the word out about Temple of Doom.

Having said that I must admit that I do not ever recall seeing the Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom board game back in the day. Thankfully this matter was corrected when the Arkadia Retrocade received a copy of it a few months back.

Joining me for this special event was none other than my fellow author on The Retroist, PLCary.

I must point out the nice design of the Temple of Doom board itself.
Temple of Doom

Each Player also receives a little board that connects to the main board – which features exciting moments from the film as well. Such as the plane crash, waterfall, the palace and of course Club Obi Wan!

After a go with the spinner, a Player must travel the full number of steps. At the very beginning you must choose to take the shorter path which is more dangerous. Or the longer path giving you more opportunities to avoid landing on a danger – sending you back precious steps or even to the beginning.

Dotted across the board are symbols featuring both Indy’s hat and whip and the visage of Mola Ram. When landing on these symbols a Player spins the spinner – if it matches the symbol you have landed upon, two outcomes take place. A match of symbols while on Indy’s hat means a Player can move a piece up to 3 spaces. Where as if you match while on Mola Ram’s symbol – you lose your next turn…probably trying to avoid having your heart ripped out.

Another key point is that a Player isn’t allowed to jump over another of their pieces. Which means there are moments in fact during the game where you are stuck. An opposing Player is allowed to land on your piece – placing your piece where they just were. An act by and large that can become beneficial in certain cases, especially when you enter the temple itself.
Temple of Doom

After navigating the treacherous temple, avoiding the sulfurous pitfalls. By foot or using the stairwells as shortcuts, you begin to move Indy, Willie, and Short Round to the appropriate colored mine carts. A Player must get all three of their playing pieces on the cart before they can race for the finish line.

In our game, while PLCary pulled ahead at the beginning – I made it through the mines first. But on the negative side you need an exact number to cross the rope bridge and win the game. All three of your pieces must have crossed before you can claim victory.

I was getting bad spins and PLCary easily caught up with me. It was a battle across the rope bridge but in the end I lucked out and managed to get all of my pieces across first.

Which in the spirit of Temple of Doom meant I of course paused to cut the rope bridge.


Generally speaking board games based on 1980’s franchises were something of a crapshoot. I can say though that the Temple of Doom game was exceptionally fun. If you can get your hands on it – it is most worth adding to your collection.

Raiders Re-Imagined

Here’s an intriguing item that popped up recently. Steven Soderbergh has posted a re-imagined version of Raiders of the Lost Ark, replacing the audio and removing the color, all to enhance the ‘staging’ of the movie. The film producer has a point; even without the classic score, quote-friendly dialogue and saturated colors, the film fizzes with atmosphere and I’m sure others could learn a lot from this toned-down masterpiece.

I read somewhere that Spielberg originally wanted to produce the film in black and white. Whilst I’m glad that he didn’t, I can see his reasoning. Visit Soderbergh’s Extension 765 website to see the film.

Retro Polish Movie Posters

Retro Polish Movie Posters

Aliens Retro Polish Movie Posters

I recently wrote about an unusual Italian ‘Battle For the Planet of the Apes’ movie poster. This got me thinking that there might be other films that have received similar treatment and so a search was started to find more oddities. Believe me when I say that what I found was a treasure trove of weirdness…

For example, the poster above is for the 1987 ‘Aliens’ – but you had guessed that, right? Those eyes weren’t fooling you?!

Raiders of the Lost Ark Retro Polish Movie Posters

‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ received an impressive montage of images, replete with multiple swastika’s! And ‘Return of the Jedi’ has a new hero in C-3PO, where the golden protocol droid takes centre stage in some very nice artwork!

My favourite from those I browsed through has to be this ‘Harry and the Hendersons’ poster. Peace Man!

Harry and the Hendersons Retro Polish Movie Posters

These posters and many many more can be found over at PolishPosters.com.

Lakeside gets Outrageous

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If you think Lakeside’s “tribute” to Raiders of the Lost Ark ended with the logo on their 1984 album, you haven’t watched the video for their song Outrageous.

I don’t know why Lakeside is no longer a band but I’m guessing it’s because they went broke after blowing millions of dollars on the choreography and special effects on this music video. The cost of generating those red lasers alone could have broke the bank.

R.I.P. Ralph McQuarrie (1929 – 2012)

For the man I hold responsible for not only the existence of the original Star Wars trilogy but it’s look and feel, I just don’t think I have the adequate words for how much I’m affected by his passing.

Most everyone knows how George Lucas was finding doors shut in his face by the leading movie studios when trying to secure financing for his space saga. It wasn’t until Lucas hired McQuarrie to produce Production Paintings that would help to convey to the Studio Executives what he had envisioned in his mind’s eye for the film that the necessary funding was obtained, in fact it was the first studio they held a meeting with after the paintings had been completed, 20th Century Fox.

Ralph McQuarrie’s career didn’t obviously stop at Star Wars. He also had a hand in designs for Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., Raiders of the Lost Ark, Cocoon, Nightbreed, and even the Back to the Future Ride that was at Universal Studios beginning in 1991 until it’s closure in 2007.

George Lucas has written a very nice remembrance over on the official Star Wars.Com site.


[Via] Star Wars.Com