Planet of the Apes Revelations

War For The Planet Of The Apes Revelations

With War for the Planet of the Apes set to debut tomorrow. It is the perfect time to head out and pick up the prequel from Titan Books. Written by Greg Keyes War for the Planet of the Apes Revelations picks up shortly after the events of the 2014 film. I certainly hope this won’t come as a spoiler but Caesar’s clan of apes isn’t so exactly sure that what Koba attempted to pull off was the wrong thing.
Planet of the Apes Revelations - Koba

So of course with some apes feeling that Caesar might in fact be a little too forgiving of the Humans. I feel it’s more than safe to tell you that Koba’s revolution isn’t quite finished. Or at the very least in Planet of the Apes Revelations there is still the very real threat of dissent.
Planet of the Apes Revelations

In addition if you remember at the end of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. The community of humans was able to send a signal to a military group. With the end of the film painting a rather and the unevitable war between apes and humans. This is in fact exactly where Planet of the Apes Revelations picks up, just moments after the end of the film.

Keyes does a wonderful job with not just the cast of characters we’ve met through the films but also introducing new ones. Case in point, Ray, an oranguatan who is both friend and companion to the Son of Caesar, Blue Eyes. Much like in the films with Maurice, Ray kind of steals the show in the book, providing wisdom beyond his years and counsel.
Planet of the Apes Revelations

As I said, Caesar has his hands full with possible treachery and dissension within his ranks. Which is why of course Blue Eyes and Ray get the majority of attention in the book. However it also introduces us to a main protagonist from the upcoming film. Colonel McCullough who is of course played by Woody Harrelson and at least in Planet of the Apes Revelations you can’t help but kind of understand where he is coming from. While some elements of his personality are very much like Caesar – he is obviously the dark side of that.
Planet of the Apes Revelations

So do you need to read Planet of the Apes Revelations before seeing War for the Planet of the Apes? Having not seen the film for myself yet I am still confident in saying that the answer is a negative. But Keyes really does a great job expanding the cinematic world we’ve been introduced to in the first two films. I’ve read his previous prequel novel for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes entitled Firestorm. He won’t let you Apes fans down and the best part is you can head out right this minute and pick up the book for yourself!

Now you know about Planet of the Apes Revelations why not check out Jason Edmiston’s “Trophies”?


Image courtesy of Jason Edmiston’s deviantART Page.

Logistics

Retro Records: Star Trek – The Logistics Of Stampede (1975)

Welcome back, friends. To a new installment for Retro Records featuring 1975’s Star Trek: The Logistics of Stampede. Another one of those fantastic Power Records offerings – which of course allowed all manner of famous writers to tell abridged tales. Case in point with The Logistics of Stampede which so happens to have been penned by Alan Dean Foster.

Foster is pretty well known for writing numerous novelizations for films. Alien, Star Wars, Alien Nation, The Thing, Star Trek and many more. As well as his own standalone novels like Cat-a-lyst, Cyberway, and Slipt to name a few.

Power Records was of course a spinoff label so to speak of Peter Pan Records. One that was geared towards an older audience. Moreover this is why we saw Power Records book and records fare featuring Kojak, Planet of the Apes and Star Trek.

Which brings us to this offering for Retro Records. The Logistics of Stampede finds Kirk, Bones, and Spock beaming down to Ribol II. An agricultural planet that is in fact facing destruction of their precious crops by Dranzers. A cow-like beast that every six years becomes overpopulated and then stampedes across the plains. Destroying seventy to ninety percent of the grain crops!

Can our trio of heroes come up with a solution to halt the Dranzers? Can they protect the grain on Ribol II – which in addition helps to feed other planets in the Federation? Let’s find out as we listen to The Logistics of Stampede on Retro Records!
Logistics

[Via] Doctor Del

Having listened to The Logistics of Stampede perhaps you now need more Star Trek goodness?


Well, in this case how about the great and late Leonard Nimoy’s cover of Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love To Town? Which might be better known from Kenny Roger’s take back in 1969 – written by Mel Tillis of all people.

[Via] Soren123

Battle For the Planet of the Apes poster

This Battle For the Planet of the Apes poster is from a different universe!

If you study the film poster above, a number of things stand out as unusual. I’ll leave you to make your own notes, though I will say this – what’s with those glasses? This is a 1973 Italian poster for the final film in the ‘Apes series and, in Italy, it seems to be a very different movie!

Here’s how the poster looked elsewhere:

Battle For the Planet of the Apes

I’m not saying I don’t like the Italian artwork, but I would definitely be expecting ray-guns, had I visited the cinema based on that imagery.

Whilst I’m here, I might as well share this alternative Japanese poster which is far better in my opinion:

Battle For the Planet of the Apes

You can find lots more film posters over on my Pinterest board.

The Art of Barry Blankenship

Weekend Warrior

After discovering the Weekend Warrior artwork above, I went in search of more from artist Barry Blankenship and I didn’t come away disappointed. His use of colour is amazing and when he turns his eye to Planet of the Apes (below) and The Last Starfighter (bottom), the results are mesmerizing.

Evolution
Starfighter

Check out Barry’s website and his store for more great pieces, including his ‘Jacked‘ series of famous vehicles!

Make-up of the Planet of the Apes

No, this isn’t the title of the next installment of the Apes franchise, but rather a cool home video of the late Roddy McDowall receiving his make-up for the 1968 original. Added to the visuals is a little of the film score which works surprisingly well in this context.

If you make it to 8:45 in the video, you’ll then be treated with more of McDowall’s home movies, giving yet more behind-the-scenes footage from the film.