Pirates

More Pirates Of The Caribbean Models To Die For!

Pirates of the Caribbean Models
Welcome to The Death of Super Blog Team Up. As the title indicates, this time were all looking at famous deaths of fictional characters.
I decided to go with a group that is more famous after dying than they were while living – the spooky skeletons of Disneyland’s classic ride Pirates Of The Caribbean.
When I was a kid plastic and balsa wood model kits were extremely popular. Some of the most famous sets of models were…
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the Disneyland Pirates of the Caribbean sets. One of the things which made these sets so popular is that they moved. Their Zap / Action feature was powered by rubber bands.

This is my second post about these awesome models. These Pirates Of The Caribbean Models Are To Die For! was my first post about them.

Thanks to the sites TAY666, The Pirate’s Surgeons Journal, Universal Monster Army, and Sweet Skulls I was able to compile a wonderful set of photos of these models. I’ll be looking at three of these awesome sets in this post.
Dead Men Tell No Tales
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This model features a skeleton who is protecting a treasure. His Zap / Action is that his arm with the pistol moves.

Hoist High The Jolly Roger
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The first six of these models features skeleton pirates. The last two feature pirates who have a little more skin on their bones. This model has a peg legged pirate standing on a treasure chest and holding a Jolly Roger on a flag pole. His Zap /Action is that his arm and sword move up and down.
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Here are the model pieces still in the box.

Ghost of the Treasure Guard
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I saved the best model for last! The Ghost of the Treasure Guard mixes parts from Dead Men Tell No Tales and Hoist High The Jolly Roger. The result is a model where a skeletal guard defends his treasure from a peg legged pirate. This set has two Zap / Actions. The Ghost of the Treasure Guard’s arm with the pistol moves up and down. The peg leg pirate who is attacking has a sword which also moves up and down. The idea of having model where a skeleton and human pirate fight each other for a treasure is just brilliant.

Now that you’ve had your daily rations of Pirates of Caribbean vintage models…


Please check out the other contributors to The Death of Super Blog Team Up. They’re dying to meet you.
Comic Reviews By Walt: Death of the Mutanimals (Archie-TMNT)
Longbox Graveyard: Death of Captain Marvel
Between the Pages: The Death of Spock (Wrath of Khan) – This post was also
written by your truly! Between the Pages is my other home on the web.
Chris is on Infinite Earths: Death of Supergirl
Crapbox Son Of Chthulu: Death Of My Love For Marvel Comics
Comics and Coffee: Superman – The Man Who Murdered The Earth
Superhero Satellite: Death of a Collector’s Passion. A Redemption story.
In My Not So Humble Opinion: The Death of Galactus

Skull and Crossbones

I was reading the NES section of Brett Weiss’ Classic Home Video Games and discovered there was an NES port of the Atari arcade game Skull and Crossbones. That was the first time I had thought of that game in years. Atari put Skull and Crossbones into the arcades of America in 1989. I never played it, but I did see it at our local Aladdin’s Castle on one occasion. The kid playing it had made it to the ninja camp level, and two guys watching behind him said there was no way a pirate could beat a ninja. I know nothing of the game beyond that, and I don’t know if a pirate could beat a ninja or not (we’ll leave that up to Flack, our resident ninja expert). I greatly suspect, though, that the game would have been a major hit if it came out after the Pirates of the Caribbean movies. I guess The Goonies’ One-Eyed Willie just wasn’t a big enough wave for the game to surf on.