Invisible Man

Visible Appreciation For The Invisible Man

Hollywood has taken many a swipe at retelling H.G. Wells’ tale of The Invisible Man. It’s just possible that none of them were as intentionally shagadelic as the 1975 NBC TV series of the same name.
Invisible Man

The Invisible Man starred David McCallum, who had just finished a two-season stint on the BBC World War II series Colditz, but was still best known to viewers the world over as The Man From UNCLE’s Ilya Kuryakin. McCallum was instantly recognizable, and still hot property on both sides of the Atlantic, and in this series he played scientist David Westin, who uses himself as a guinea pig in experiments to achieve invisibility. Westin’s wife, Kate, is refreshingly shown to be his partner in both lab and love, and his intellectual equal as a scientist; she’s played by Melinda Fee, who later became a household name on the soap opera scene. Craig Stevens, still best known for playing Peter Gunn, is their beleaguered boss, Walter Carlson.

But the effect is supposed to be temporary, and instead Westin is permanently invisible. And since the Cold War is still on, as soon as word leaks out from the Klae Corporation, the Westins’ employer, that invisibility has been achieved, it isn’t long before government agents want Westin and his secrets, and show few qualms about hurting anyone who stands in their way. The Invisible Man is emblematic of entertainment in the lingering shadows of both Watergate and the Cold War: even our guys can’t be trusted, never mind the Commies. To prevent the process from being repeated for the benefit of spies and assassins, Westin destroys the equipment that rendered him invisible, thereby cutting off any hope that he can just step back into the machine and become visible again.

In order to pay back for the equipment and to stay in a position where he can try to figure out how to become visible again, Dan Westin becomes “the Klae Resource”, a top secret asset for which the Klae Corporation commands top-dollar prices. From takedowns of drug rings to corrupt small-town judges, nothing is more than the Invisible Man can handle. Dan always has a handy stockpile of gloves and masks that just happen to look flawlessly like the hands and head of David McCallum.

To show Dan donning or ditching his “visible man” disguise involved a problematic process of shooting on video against a blue screen, with McCallum in at least a partial blue bodysuit that would “vanish”. In an attempt to avoid the jarring switch between film and video, that video footage would be played back on a monitor whose refresh rate matched the shutter speed of a film camera positioned directly in front of it. This effect was used sparingly, both because of the time involved and because, frankly, it didn’t look that great.

So what did The Invisible Man have going for it? The sheer chemistry going on between McCallum and Fee accounts for much of the appeal. In true 1970s style, the show plays up the one thing we’ve always suspected about the Invisible Man, in whatever setting the story is told: while Westin is invisible, he’s running around naked. Little secret is made of the fact that the Westins take every opportunity to…enjoy…Dan’s invisibility. They’re a great on-screen team – The Invisible Man has a lot of comedy moments and doesn’t take itself too seriously. The invisibility gag is put to use in situations other than earth-shaking secret agent scenarios, which also keeps things lively.

If you’re new to The Invisible Man, you’ll be happy to know that the pilot movie and all twelve episodes are available on DVD and, since the show was shot on film, Blu-Ray. Be warned that the Blu-Rays, while sharp, reframe the show in widescreen, cutting off the top and bottom of film footage that was always intended to be in a 4:3 aspect ratio. I wish the Blu-Ray producers of the world would get the hint that this is as much of a butchering of the original material as pan-and-scan VHS tapes were. (The DVD gives you the original 4:3 picture.)

So why did The Invisible Man last only 12 episodes? Invisibility gags, whether they’re of the time-consuming, video-to-film type or pulling stuff along on fishing line, aren’t cheap to do, and each episode has several of them. The show’s creators, Harve Bennett and Steven Bochco, were rising stars who had more than one iron in their respective fires – Bennett was already overseeing The Six Million Dollar Man, while Bochco was in the early stages of a career that would see him go on to be the showrunner and creator of the likes of Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, and Cop Rock. After The Invisible Man’s cancellation, Bennett retooled the concept and relaunched it just a few months later as the even-shorter-lived Gemini Man, trading McCallum’s British class in for Ben Murphy’s all-American aw-shucks, which only stayed on the prime time schedule for four weeks following a pilot movie. (Gemini Man may well be remembered best for giving us the MST3K episode “Riding With Death”.)

In the meantime, rewind to 1975 and enjoy once more the days when The Invisible Man – complete with a mention of H.G. Wells in the end credits – was keeping the prime time schedule groovy.

[Via] Visual Ent

May the 4th Be With These 1978 Commercials!

There’s a bit of an overkill vibe of “May the 4th Be With You” floating around the interwebs today. You’d think it’s some kind of official holiday, wouldn’t you?

I think we can all agree to disagree,The Star Wars Holiday Special made a great case for why we don’t celebrate Life Day, but actual Star Wars cannon makes a great case for why we celebrate May 4th as Star Wars Day.

Another thing we can all agree on? How great these 1978 commercials that aired during the holiday special are…when riffed by Michael J. Nelson, Bill Corbett, and Kevin Murphy of RiffTrax and Mystery Science Theater 3000 fame.

Both uploaded by Torgo Fury

Oh, and…you want Tobor. Because he’s probably some long-lost scrapped Star Wars character who got his own toy, complete with not-so-subliminal advertising pitch from Michael J. Nelson!

Allison is the collector of commercials, and commercials with RiffTrax commentary on them? They’re even better! She’d love for you to stop by her blog, Allison’s Written Words to see some of what she has in her collection, and would love for you to follow her blog on Facebook, if you like a little randomness and geekiness in your Facebook feed. And who doesn’t? You can also find her on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut.

Allison doesn’t want Tobor.

Army of the Apes (Saru No Gundan)

In 1975 Planet of the Apes the TV series, premiered on US TV and while it would not last very long, it has an army of lasting fans and it helped keep the Apes franchise fresh in peoples minds. On the other side of the Pacific, Apes Mania found a longer run in Saru No Gundan or Army of the Apes. This was a 26 Episode Japanese science fiction series based on the Planet of the Apes franchise.

The show was produced by Tsuburaya Productions, and centered around a female scientist and two young children who have traveled through time. As we all know when you travel in time, their is a very good chance, as this show will demonstrate, you will arrive in a future ruled by Apes. That is exactly what happens to this trio and in this crazy future the three of them have adventures and all the while struggle to find a way to get back to the 20th century.

Now not many people in the USA would know about this show if not for television producer Sandy Frank. Frank edited together several episodes of the series into a movie called Time of the Apes. The film was then syndicated to broadcast and cable outlets and released on home video in mid-1988. After that release the show would be featured on MST3K not once, but twice. The first time in 1989 when they were at KTMA and then later in 1991 for Season 3 on Comedy Central.

I have only had glimpses of the original series not edited by Frank and it looks interesting. As an “Apes” fan I would enjoy watching a subtitled version of it, if it ever gets released here in the US. In the meantime, I will just sit back and enjoy the soothing music from the closing credits, Anywhere with Love sung by Toshiko Fujita.