Mr Do! - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Mr Do! (1982)

Christopher Tupa has certainly picked a fantastic and often overlooked game this week. Mr Do! has a lot of history here on the Retroist. Not only was it the second episode spotlighted on the Diary of an Arcade Employee Podcast. But in fact the Retroist himself tackled the game on his 105th podcast! In all honesty, Ctupa’s pick for this week’s Retro Arcade Art project deserves far more attention.

I say that Mr Do! deserves more attention because it gets overshadowed by Dig-Dug. I of course know that there are indeed some similarities between the two classic games.

Obviously with the latter you are playing a game where the goal is digging underground. Dispatching foes with your trusty pump or even boulders. Where as in Mr Do! the Player takes on the role of a clown digging through the strata. Taking out the bad guys with the aid of a power ball and oversized apples.

Friends, let me get right to the point. In my youth I felt that Dig-Dug was the better arcade game. It wasn’t until many, many years later that I realized that it was in fact Mr Do! that was the superior title. I realize of course you might be wanting some proof to back up that bold claim.

For one I feel our clown-themed game has more going for it. For example while you might be able to dig under the boulders and squash bad guys in Dig-Dug. With Mr Do! you can do the same as well as push those apples over the edge, letting them drop down the tunnels you’ve created.
Mr Do! - Apple Trap

Did I forgot to mention that the monsters can push those apples off towards you as well?
Mr Do! - Monsters and Apples

Furthermore, not only are the foes the Player must contend with more aggressive in Mr Do!. But while you always have your pump in Dig-Dug. The Player must hurl their power ball and hope it doesn’t bounce down the wrong tunnel!
Mr Do! - Powerball

Every time the Player uses the power ball, it takes longer to regenerate. As well as the fact you can clear a stage in multiple ways. A level will be completed if you pick up all the cherries, wipe out all the monsters, or by snagging the rare diamond.
Mr Do! - Diamond

Players can end a stage too by defeating monsters sporting letters. If you happen to spell out the word ‘extra’ you advance to the next level. However you also have to contend with Alphamonsters who gobble up those apples and hunt you down!
Mr Do! - Alphamonsters

I suppose in closing the reason I feel Mr Do! is the better arcade game, is that it requires so much more skill to play. Please bear in mind this is merely my personal opinion, friends.
Mr Do! - Universal Sticker

You know a little about Mr Do! now. So why not watch the game in action?

As always with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s Official Site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

I hope you won’t forget to check out CTupa’s previous entries in his Retro Arcade Art Project as well!

RetroArt - What the Retroist Means to Me

What The Retroist Means To Me By RetroArt

Things thought lost but now found again.

That is what the Retroist and his site means to me and I’m sure to thousands of others thanks to the site.

I envy the first time visitor who stumbles across the Retroist site and is dazzled by the brilliance of the treasure trove of things thought long lost to time gathered all in one place by a busy band of enthusiastic contributors. I recall the first time I made this discovery and I have been grateful for the Retroist ever since. This digital cave of retro-wonders has allowed me to fill in the holes of my own Pop Culture background.

I was a very tunnel-visioned child growing up in the 1970s and 1980s. I only paid attention to those things which I was immediately focused on. Everything else didn’t matter to me, wasn’t deemed worth my time. Because of this I was only vaguely aware of other things happening, like other tv shows, other movies, other music, other games, etc. The Retroist site has allowed me to become aware of so many other things that were going on around us all back then. Now, today, I have the ability to appreciate all that I missed while growing up.

The best case example of this that I can give is the MAGNUM PI tv series which ran from 1980 thru 1988. I did not see a single episode.

RetroArt - Magnum, P.I.

Tom Selleck in a 1980 Ferrari 308 GTS for Magnum, P.I.

Apparently as a 12-20 year old I was not interested in watching the exploits of a mustachioed, short-shorts wearing, ex-Navy officer now turned private investigator racing around Hawaii in a red Ferrari solving the problems of both his clients and friends. I have no idea why I wasn’t watching this back then. It’s absolutely great.

But I watch it now, even binge-watched it during four weeks, all thanks to being exposed to how much fun the series is based on the posts and, most importantly the podcast, by the Retroist himself.

This is just one example of how the Retroist has helped me re-discover many other aspects of my Pop Culture childhood that I didn’t appreciate before: QUINCY M.E., the Odyssey video game system, VOYAGERS and even the arcade game MR. DO. The list could go on and on but that’s not necessary. To see all that I have re-discovered, just go to the Retroist site and pick any post. It’s all there.

It isn’t just a revisiting of things from my past which I value about the Retroist but rather a new visit to something I’ve not seen before, something from someone else’s experience in the past which I had not experienced myself. It is this discovery of someone else’s different experiences from our shared, parallel timeline which I enjoy the most from the Retroist site. And this is also why I have contributed posts to the site as well.

Even though I have contributed only eighteen posts to the Retroist site, I did so because I wanted to give and not just take. I wanted to share something I thought is special from our collective Pop Culture history and call attention to it in hopes it could be re-appreciated. The Retroist and his wonderful site is a haven for all those who want to share these “discoveries” and give that particular item of interest its due moment in the spotlight, possibly once again after being lost to the trends of time.

That’s what the Retroist means to me, a solitary, shining site of appreciation on the vast expanse of the Internet.

Thank you, Retroist, for having done this.

It is much appreciated.

Retroist Mr Do Podcast

Retroist Mr Do Podcast

Welcome to the Retroist Mr Do Podcast. On today’s show I talk about the arcade and home video game hit, Mr. Do! Mr. Do is game that is in every way superior Dig Dug, despite what all those arcade snobs are saying. I talk about some of the company that made it (and some of their other titles), how to play the game, its sequels and lots of other fun stuff. Music on the show was provided by Peachy.

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Listen and download the Retroist Mr Do Podcast


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Parallel Thinking in the creation of Classic Games: Dig Dug and Mr. Do

MrNeilESQ posted a great look at the similarities of two games made by two companies at the same time. Two games that demonstrate that similar ideas can come to fruition without being ripoffs of one another. I found it very interesting since I know so many people who really appreciate Dig Dug, but give very little to the superior (in my opinion), Mr. Do.

Which is superior?

Read Parallel Thinking in Classic Games: Dig Dug and Mr. Do [@] Aging Geekfully