Singin' Sixties

Retroist Scoreboard: The Singin’ Sixties

A bit of a light week here at the Retroist Scoreboard, but there’s still music in the air. And pollen. Maybe more pollen than music this week, admittedly, but there’s still music.

Intrada has unearthed Frank Perkins’ combination score-and-songs album from the 1963 Warner Bros. all-star summer flick Palm Springs Weekend, featuring vocal contributions from the likes of Troy Donahue, Robert Conrad, and Connie Stevens. The album, restored from the original master tapes from the 1960s LP release, weighs in at just a little over half an hour, but if you need a fresh (and rarely-heard) fix from the Beach Blanket Bingo era, this is your ticket back to those times.
Singin' Sixties

Varese Sarabande will begin shipping the first-ever official CD release of the soundtrack from 1968’s Barbarella this Friday, featuring Charles Fox’s score with vocals and performances by Bob Crewe and the Bob Crewe Generation Orchestra. Pre-orders are still being taken, and the price on this one is definitely right.

And you may be able to score this score for even less! Due to upgrades of their shipping systems, Varese is offering a 10% discount on all orders placed between May 8th and 21st, the catch being that shipping may be a little bit on the slow side during that period.

Is that all? That is not all.

Occasionally I might point out new or upcoming releases that tickle our ears the way a good soundtrack does, and it just so happens that my picks in that category this week feature some of the pioneer originators of electronic music, and some of its best current practitioners. Full disclosure: both parties include friends of mine, so forgive me for being a little less impartial than usual.

The Radiophonic Workshop is a live, touring, recording amalgamation of original members of the now-defunct BBC Radiophonic Workshop and newer members. Members Dick Mills and Roger Limb were there in the ‘60s and ‘70s, when the Workshop’s pioneering works included the original iteration of the Doctor Who theme music, while later recruits Peter Howell and Paddy Kingsland helped define that show’s sound in the 1980s, Howell in particular having arranged the Peter Davison / Colin Baker era version of the Doctor Who theme.

Mark Ayres, who joined the Workshop in its twilight years partly as an archivist of its classic material, and Kieron Pepper, round out the current incarnation of the Workshop, and they’ve assembled a new album using vintage synthesizers and radiophonic recording techniques, Burials In Several Earths, now available for pre-order both as a download and on CD or vinyl. The album drops on May 19th.

[Via] The Radiophonic Workshop

The Radiophonic Workshop originated in the late 1950s, creating electronic wizardry out of tape loops and oscillators on a shoestring budget in a tiny studio in the BBC’s Maida Vale facility. They’ve done a lot more than just Doctor Who – Kingsland single-handedly scored the BBC’s radio and TV incarnations of The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy – though their live shows feature callbacks to their past glories aplenty.

On the slightly more modern side of things, 8 Bit Weapon is releasing an experimental concept EP on May 8th under the title DLC: The OST. Renowned for crafting amazingly multi-layered music from the sound chips of classic video game consoles and computers, the electronic duo consisting of Seth and Michelle Sternberger is taking satirical aim at the industry that made their instruments this time around…or, at least, that industry’s modern tendency to foist incomplete games upon the buying public. The press blurb for DLC: The OST asks: “What IF the music industry followed this business model? How much of a song would you hear before you purchased the rest of it as DLC?“

Next week: get ready for the Lasso of Truth to snatch your wallet, because La-La Land Records is finally releasing a 3-CD box set of music from the 1970s Wonder Woman series, including music from the pilot movie, and even more music from the second and third seasons. Tune in next week for the details!

Untouchables

Retroist Scoreboard: Untouchables And Labyrinth – Goblins And Gangsters

Two Retroist Scoreboards in one week? Well…I thought these two releases might be worthy of note for you retro-fixated collectors and listeners out there.

Dragon’s Domain Records is giving us a 2-CD set of music from an early ‘90s TV series whose scores have never seen the light of day before: the syndicated revival of The Untouchables, a series that followed Eliot Ness, a federal agent who has to push the boundaries of the law to try to bring down Al Capone’s gang operation in the era of Prohibition. Obviously the success of the then-recent 1987 film had a lot to do with The Untouchables’ return to our screens, and a big-screen musical treatment was sought, courtesy of Joel Goldsmith, who composed music for the show’s entire run after the studio was swayed by the quality of his score for the pilot episode. For the recording session involving the series’ main theme, Joel’s dad, Jerry Goldsmith, dropped by to conduct the orchestra. The younger Goldsmith would go on to score Stargate SG-1, Stargate Atlantis, the live-action Witchblade TV series, and would collaborate with his father on the music for Star Trek: First Contact. Joel Goldsmith died in 2012. There will be only 1000 copies of The Untouchables TV music pressed, which is a good reason to do a special Scoreboard column – you’d better snap this up before Capone and his gang snatch them all.

That’s the Chicago way.

[Via] The Rap Sheet

Amazon.Com is taking pre-orders for the May 12th vinyl re-release of the soundtrack from Labyrinth, scored by Trevor Jones and featuring David Bowie. This is the first vinyl pressing of Labyrinth since the LP was released alongside the movie itself, and the contents of the album are exactly the same. If your attempts to get Labyrinth on vinyl have been stymied by the steady increase in the price of the original pressing on the secondary market, the arrival of a new pressing that can be had for under $20 will be a welcome development.
Labyrinth

Okay, now I think we’ve covered all of this week’s releases and pre-orders. Tune in next time to see how the soundtrack labels decide to make my life interesting in the weeks ahead!
P.S. Mr. Nitti is waiting in the car.
Untouchables

Tune - X Files

Retroist Scoreboard: The Tune Is Out There

Tune

“The Tune is out there, Scully.”

As promised last week, this week is for the X-Files fans among you, as La-La Land rolls out a 2-disc compilation of highlights from Mark Snow’s scores for the most recent “event season” of The X-Files, and the track list is a pretty tempting one:

Disc One
MY STRUGGLE
1. Prologue (2:59)
2. THE X-FILES Main Title (Season 9) (0:36)
3. Ride to Roswell (2:09)
4. Call to Mulder (1:49)
5. Sveta (4:31)
6. Sveta Exam (1:47)
7. Alien Replica Vehicle/Element 115 (3:09)
8. Lab Labors (2:16)
9. Sveta’s Story (3:17)
10. Mulder’s Office (1:58)
11. Deep Throat (2:35)
12. Home Fire (1:55)
13. Conspiracy Montage (5:14)
14. Sveta Confesses (1:48)
15. Parking Garage (2:26)
16. Sveta Gets Zapped (1:18)
17. Smoking Man (0:44)

FOUNDER’S MUTATION
18. Insecure Insecurity (2:30)
19. Hand Message (3:33)
20. Pull the Thread/Semi-Alien Boy (10:04)
21. Capsules (5:01)
22. Aquaiescent (1:46)
23. A Mother Never Forgets (2:23)
24. The Farm House/Catching Kyle (3:32)
25. The Real Molly (2:46)
26. Mulder’s Memories (2:47)
Disc One Total Time: 75:55

Disc Two
HOME AGAIN
1. City Shower Services (1:15)
2. No Prints/The Call (2:17)
3. Extubation (0:37)
4. Remorse (1:41)
5. Sub-Urban (3:05)
6. Tulku (3:33)
7. More Remorse (2:20)

BABYLON
8. Prayer (1:13)
9. Einstein/Miller (2:01)
10. Mugwump (5:02)
11. Evacuation (3:25)
12. Ummu (2:48)
13. Motel (1:35)
14. Walk With Me (1:24)

MY STRUGGLE II
15. Recap (1:31)
16. Scully’s Story (2:27)
17. Fed Ford/Alien American DNA (4:35)
18. Vaccine Alienation/One-Class Infection (2:27)
19. Smokin’ God (6:58)
20. The Spartan Virus (7:48)
21. Crispr Cas9 (6:33)
22. William Is Out There (4:32)
23. THE X-FILES End Credits (New Orbit) (0:35)
24. I Made This/20th Century Fox Fanfare (0:08)


MULDER AND SCULLY MEET THE WERE-MONSTER
25. Bonus Track: Suite (4:32)

Disc Two Total Time: 79.14
Total Set Running Time: 154.69

If you haven’t picked up any of La-La Land’s X-Files box sets from the original series run, there are two things you should know: they’re fantastic, and they’re on sale! The four-disc Volume One, still in stock, has been marked down to $30, and the second and third volumes, also four discs each, have been reduced to $40 each through May 8th. If you want to believe, that’s fine – if you want to listen, even better!

Varese Sarabande is taking pre-orders for the May 19th release of Angelo Badalamenti’s Blue Velvet soundtrack on vinyl, with side one consisting of selections from the score, and side two featuring songs from Roy Orbison, Julee Cruise, and others. This LP reprint is being offered exclusively through Amazon.

And just when you thought it was safe and there were only a couple of releases to talk about, a wild label appears! Notefornote Music is reprinting an early Hans Zimmer score, Thelma & Louise, previously issued as a limited editing by Kritzerland Records in 2011. If you missed that earlier release, this is your chance to fill that gap in your collection.

The hits, as a wise man once said, just keep on coming – watch this space next week for more of the latest soundtrack news.

[Via] JoBlo TV Show Trailer

The Music Of Jesus Christ Superstar

Ghoul Mourning Maniacs!

Happy Easter! This time, I’d like to talk music. Specifically, Jesus Christ Superstar’s music.

The musical and movie were created by someone named Andrew Lloyd Weber. I doubt he’ll ever find work anywhere. Yeah, right! Ok, ok. Just kidding.

[Via] MovieClips Trailer Vault

I didn’t see Jesus Christ Superstar until well into the home video age, so this actually, has way more to do with the music. My sisters and I would gather around the piano and belt out the songs. Especially at Easter time, but not exclusively. The older two, Debbie and Kathy, would play the piano, maybe Liz or I, would get to turn the pages, and we’d just rock it out!
Jesus Christ Superstar

Now, this may sound goofy, but, we are a musical family. Our dad owned a music store, which my sister now owns. So, it was not uncommon for many, many jam sessions to spring up out of nowhere. If I called or sent a text , saying, “What’s the buzz? Tell me what’s a happening.” They’d get it right away. I don’t know if we were more Von Trapp or Brady Bunch, but man what a racket!!

Thanks to the Leeds Music Corporation for producing the deluxe motion picture album, which included musical score selections, great color and black and white photos from the movie, lyrics, some dialogue, etc. The book was a real “all-in-one” affair.

Our copy of the book has been taped and retaped over the years, as we certainly used it a lot. From our house on the river, to the brick house in the town, to the house in the lumber city, that songbook got around! It was fun to thumb through it, even when we weren’t using it musically.

When I finally did see the film and soaked up the music, it was pretty cool and made any future jam session have more depth. I had a better understanding of where the performers were coming from, musically.

You might want to search this book out and try your own sibling jam session. I think you’ll find it to be funky and fun! Or, your neighbor will through shoes at you, for your awful caterwauling! Who’s to say?! Anyway, enjoy!!

Does Jason Scheff Remember To Be “Young”?

You know, because when you’re one of the lead singers of a band whose average age (in the mid-1980s) was at least 40, you may forget how “young” you really are. I wonder if Jason Scheff ever actually had that problem…

Fangirl Love And College Acceptance

I write about Chicago alot.

I’m aware of my obvious fangirl love, and it is something I will never deny.

That said…

For me, college feels like a lifetime ago, and in reality, it was actually 16 years ago when I received my acceptance letter. The nail-biting and worrying from the time the application goes into the mail to the time the determination letter arrives is the pits, but it is worth it when the hard work pays off.

My high school gradation photo – class of 2001.

A few days after I graduated from college (in December 2005), I was job hunting, when a movie came on HBO that sounded interesting enough to take me away from my job-hunting for a little while. Ironically, it was about the end of high school life struggle of getting into the college of your choice. I appreciated the movie then, but liked it even more a few years later while watching Fox Movie Channel. That movie was How I Got Into College, and is the 100%* relatable story of what we do, and how we stress out, while trying to get into the college we want to attend.

*It is a bit overdramatic.

Me graduating from the college I wanted to attend. College graduation photo from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (now Stockton University), class of 2005.

The Theme Song

While I was watching the movie, I took notice of a song that played during the Obligatory Montage Scene that the best 1980s movies are, by law**, required to have.

**Absolute truth.

I also took notice of the song used during said Obligatory Montage Scene, which sounded like someone very familiar, singing a song about staying young. Of course, I wasn’t really well-versed with Chicago vocalists at the time, so it was almost mind-blowing that Peter Cetera would be involved with a song about youth. I mean, he was clearly 40-something in 1989, right?

The truth cracks me up to this day. Silly girl, that’s not Peter Cetera singing about youth, that’s an incredible sound-alike!

“But He Sounds JUST LIKE HIM!”

I forever got Peter Cetera and Jason Scheff’s voices mixed up years ago. As it turns out, that isn’t difficult. Turns out that this “misstep” can be forgiven. For instance, I’ll forgive you for your mistake. It is ok, you are allowed to make that mistake. You are human.

But all that aside, Jason Scheff was the youngest member of a group who had not only been around since the late 1960s, but took over as one of their lead vocalists at the age of 23. That’s a big job – a group that had been together for almost 20 years, you’re barely older than that, and you’ve got an impressive catalog of songs to sing?

He handled himself well. For 31 years.

As a solo artist, Jason Scheff provided the vocals to the Obligatory Montage Scene from How I Got Into College, and while I can’t find that montage on You Tube (probably because the movie is from 20th Century Fox, and I don’t believe their stuff can be posted on You Tube), I can find you that song. And what looks like a music video to go with it.

Uploaded by Sai Guzman

And this is the full song, without any kind of music video attached.

Uploaded by Music 80s AOR

Movie Availability

As for How IGot into College, this movie is as difficult to track down as this song was for years!

I did find the DVD of this movie on Amazon, but it is expensive (as of this writing, the DVD is $26.85). Your best bet would be to track down a used copy. I ran into this problem in 2009 when I wanted to buy the DVD of it, and couldn’t even get it. I wound up recording (almost wrote “taping”!) the movie from Fox Movie Channel to a DVD that year. If you haven’t seen it, it is worth the watch.

And as for Jason Scheff, he’s not “young” anymore, but he did continue to make a name for himself as the bassist and lead vocalist of Chicago until leaving the group in October 2016. But during his tenure, he made beautiful music, and even made “Street Player” sound like a halfway decent Chicago song. So he was obviously doing something right, even after he was trying to be “forever young.”

Yeah, I’ll stop.

Allison’s Note: I’ve had this song on my iPod for a few years (since about 2010), but didn’t know at the time who Jason Scheff was. It was actually several years before I really started listening to Chicago and made the connection. I was inspired to write this article after listening to this song the other day, and remember how hard the song (and movie!) were to come across at the time.