1988 Oscars

What Won For The Best Original Song At The 1988 Oscars?

The Academy Awards have always been rather important to me. Even as a kid I would frequently be able to convince my Family that they should let me watch them. The 1988 Oscars were no exception. It did mark though the first time I had actually seen all of the nominated movies in the category for Best Original Song.

Which is why I vividly recall seeing the likes of Dudley Moore and Liza Minnelli presenting the award. My Father and I were always huge fans of Dudley Moore in fact. Thanks to catching 1981’s Arthur at the 62 Drive-In of my youth.
1988 Oscars

Of course it was equally important to myself that for this particular category in the 1988 Oscars. I happened to like all of the songs that were nominated. First up you had the moving song from Cry Freedom by George Fenton and Jonas Gwangwa.

Parmenides320

After that the second nomination was I’ve Had the Time of my Life from Dirty Dancing. Music by Franke Previtte, John Denicola, and Donald Markowitz. This by the way was the song that my Grandmother felt should take the award at the 1988 Oscars!
1988 Oscars - Dirty Dancing

[Via] BillMJennWVEVO

Occasionally the Academy Awards picks something you wouldn’t have expected. Case in point Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now from Mannequin! The song was by Albert Hammond and Diane Warren, however it was Jefferson Starship that belted out the tune.

[Via] StarshipVEVO

Yet another song that the Academy picked for the 1988 Oscars that will get your feet moving, was Beverley Hills Cop II’s Shakedown by Harold Faltermeyer and Keith Forsey. The lyrics had a little help from Bob Seger who in fact sang the song for the film.

[Via] mugabesunny

Finally we have the song Storybook Love from The Princess Bride. Music and lyrics by Willy Deville. This is the song that I was certain was going to win the award – I just knew it.

[Via] Mark Knopfler

Now that you know who was nominated for the 1988 Oscars for Best Original Song. Let’s find out who the award goes to!

12 Movies My Little Brother Watched Over and Over When We Were Kids

He denies none of this. And even freely admits to Girls Just Want to Have Fun and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but questions my use of the words “over and over” on the others. (Yes, I fact-checked this list with my brother.)

For years, my brother and I shared a room; as did my sisters, but this is not about them. In the years before that, our humbler, younger selves even shared a bed—that poor kid. He’s fine; he’s got a freaking PhD. Don’t worry about him.

Living with a younger brother was fine and fun enough—even if he was “the baby.” We certainly heard enough of THAT when we were kids. I do give him credit for actually getting out alive. Youngest of four! The poor kid.

Of the many memories I have of my lil’ bro, I recall often his tendency to watch and re-watch a movie ad nauseam. We’re talking the VHS tapes (from whenever he recorded them on HBO) would start warping. Stopping only when he found another movie to watch on loop like he was studying it for a dissertation. (His dissertation for his PhD, by the way, made no mention of these cinematic gems.)

In any case, his proclivity for films were not the typical masterpieces you’d find on any “Greatest Works on Celluloid” lists. I’d be surprised if you find a version of some of them that’s not still on VHS. (I’d almost pay for a laserdisc of any of them. No. No I won’t.)

Girls Just Want to Have Fun—The Sarah Jessica Parker-Helen Hunt romp featuring the titular Cyndi Lauper hit. (If I heard the “Dancing in Heaven” lyric “Slow. Slow. Quick-quick slow.” again, I could very well die.)

Fast Forward—Continuing the dance theme, a group of dancers who try to “make it” in New York. (Lyric worm: “Forward! Forward! Moving fast-forward!”)

The Legend of Billie Jean—Okay, I’ll admit, this was a pretty badass movie. Helen and Christian Slater (who are not brother and sister play brother and sister) while Pat Benatar rocks on the theme song “Invincible.”

My Chauffeur—I am fairly certain NO ONE knows this movie about a young woman who (dare I say it?) becomes a limo driver. (::Gasp::)

Mannequin—“Roxie, you look foxy!” You know this Andrew McCarthy-Kim Cattrall crazily-plotted comedy also featuring Meshach Taylor as “Hollywood!”

Who’s That Girl—Madonna. Madonna is that girl. “What’s your husband’s name? Louden. And his last name? Clear.”

Can’t Buy Me Love—Patrick Dempsey in that old nerd-pays-popular girl-to-act-like-his-girlfriend shtick you know too well.

Teen Witch (*brother himself offered up this entry—which I can’t believe I forgot)—“Top That!” I think I’ve said it all.

Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead—I certainly did not mind him watching this Christina Applegate movie?&emdash;?“The dishes are done, man.”

The Cutting Edge—The hockey player-turned-ice skater movie with D.B. Sweeney and Moira Kelly (she’s also in another fave of his: With Honors).

Buffy the Vampire Slayer—Kristy Swanson and Luke Perry starred in the movie that would later spawn the TV series. Paul Reubens’ death scene always got me.

Hackers—By this point, I was already out of the house most of the time, but I do recall this Angelina Jolie-Jonny Lee Miller flick. As you should.

Freeze frame: My “little” brother went on to grow into quite a man whom I’m proud to share a name with and occasional meal. If these above had any lasting effect on making him who he is today, so be it. We all have our Weird Sciences. And… I may have mentioned his PhD, right? Okay.

Cue: “Don’t You Forget About Me.” Roll credits.

bender

80s Movie Poster Heroes and their Ladies

Vision Quest was one of the movies I missed in the 80s. I finally got around to watching it tonight. I liked it, and there is lots I could say about it: Matthew Modine, Daphne Zuninga, the old man from Home Alone, the 80s sound track (Berlin, John Waite, REO Speedwagon, Journey), the actual appearance of Madonna, the meandering way movies of that time had. But what I really left the movie with is a greater appreciation of the poster.
Vision_Quest_(1985_film)_video_boxart
I had seen the poster before and liked it. I don’t know why it never led me to the movie, but I still liked it. On the surface, there’s not much to like. It’s just a guy and a girl. But below that, it expresses one of the most important ideas of an 80s film: the proximity of the hero to the heroine. Look at how Modine is embracing Fiorentino: its not only intimate and slightly sexual but also tender. She is affirming him and he is protecting her.

You see similar hero-heroine poses in several other movie posters.

top-gun-movie-poster-1986-1020280560

mov188358

Romancing_the_stone

mannequin-poster1
(Okay, maybe this one shouldn’t count.)

It was an idea communicated in pictures, not words or actions. But it was one I clearly received, and one that I still love today.