Popeye

Toon In: Popeye – Cookin’ With Gags (1955)

Welcome back, friends, to a new Toon In. This week we have Popeye the Sailor in a 1955 Associated Artists Production short entitled Cookin’ With Gags. An appropriate selection I think you will certainly agree as today is April 1st.

When I was growing up, I would watched quite a bit of A.A.P. Popeye cartoons. Whiling way the hours until it was time to race down to the bus stop. This was possible in fact thanks to the block programming by TBS in the early 80s.

Besides the likes of Popeye, that TBS block of cartoons would generally include Looney Tunes. As well as the King Features Syndicate characters Krazy Kat, Beetle Bailey, and even Snuffy Smith and Barney Google.

[Via] Angel Casusol

I think you Toon In fans might find it interesting that both Snuffy and Barney, were voiced by none other than Paul Frees. Of course you should recognize Paul’s distinct voice from his work on The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show and myriad Rankin/Bass specials. Of course he was also well known for voicing animated features and shorts for Walt Disney!

Read: Mars And Beyond (1957)

I apologize, friends. As usual I have let my train of thought run away with me. In our offering today, we find Popeye attempting to remain calm while attending a picnic with Bluto and Olive Oyl. The pranks range from the common industrial spring on an axe.
Popeye

To the addition of pouring gasoline on an open flame.

While it may indeed be April Fools Day, there is however only so much a Sailor Man can take. Will Popeye be able to thwart Bluto with a prank of his own? Furthermore will Olive Oyl see that she is being rather mean to our favorite Sailor Man? Toon In and let’s find out together!

[Via] Just For Fun

Bugs Bunny

Do You Recall This 1982 Bugs Bunny PSA Commercial?

You know, most people would say that Bugs Bunny was a pretty smart rabbit. Even though his quasi original appearance and some characteristics can be found in 1938’s Porky’s Hare Hunt. It was a more zany as well as madcap rabbit on display – acting almost like Daffy Duck.
Bugs Bunny - Porky Pig

It wasn’t however until the 1940 theatrical short entitled A Wild Hare that Bugs Bunny really made the scene. Even then he wasn’t know as Bugs, but he was still voiced by the legendary Mel Blanc, although he initially wasn’t credited.

So began Bugs Bunny’s meteoric rise to stardom. Over the past 77 years our favorite wisecracking hare has certainly changed. For example the character evolved into a role as sort of the straight man. Case in point when he was teamed up with Daffy Duck in 1956’s A Star is Bored!

Being a beloved icon for so many children and as well as their parents. It was of course only natural that Bugs Bunny be tapped as a spokesman for this public service announcement for the Shriners Hospital. In this 1982 PSA he warns children in addition to adults about ways to make the kitchen safer.

That is most certainly a fantastic looking kitchen.


While there are in fact a few bits that could be considered scary images as you see, none of them cross the line into truly frightening. The boiling pot I will have to admit does creep me out a little though.

The advice from 1982 is just as important today so take a minute and listen to Bugs Bunny!

Bugs Bunny wasn’t the only Looney Tunes character to help out with PSA ads. Check out this 1990 version featuring Tweety Bird!

Bugs Bunny And Friends By Jerrod Maruyama

looney-tunes-logo
I’m a big fan of Jerrod Maruyama artwork. When I’m not blogging on the Retroist, I can be found at my Pop Culture / Food Blog – Between the Pages. My blog’s mascot – Ace – was created by Jerrod.
ace

Jerrod just released a wonderful print called Bugs and Friends for Dark Hall Mansion.


Bugs and Friends - Jerrod Maruyama - Dark Hall Mansion
The detail on this print is amazing!

The silver carrot holder beside Bugs is engraved with his initials.

There is a framed picture of Playboy Penguin from ‘8 Ball Bunny’ over Bug’s TV.

In addition to his most famous foes like Marvin the Martian, Yosemite Sam, & Elmer Fudd, this print also includes the Gremlin (from Falling Hare), Witch Hazel, Gossamer (the heart shaped monster), Pete Puma, “Babyface” Finster, and Rocky.

This print brings a smile to my face and makes me long for Saturday Morning Cartoons.

(Karen’s post and lament for the lost days of Saturday morning cartoons made think we need to watch Playboy Penguin. So for your viewing enjoyment we present 1950’s “8 Ball Bunny”! – Vic)

[Via] Alex Webb

Toon In: For Scent-imental Reasons (1949)

Welcome back friends to another installment of Toon In. The second for this week but I felt with the audio treasure posted earlier this week a more traditional Toon In offering was in order. That is why I have chosen a 1949 Looney Tunes animated short, which won the 1949 Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film – the first for Director Chuck Jones.

As you can see from the image at the top of the post and even without it I am sure you could have guessed by the pun in the title – this short features the romantic antics of Pepe Le Pew.
Pepe Le Pew
The story in For Scent-imental Reasons find the propietor of a perfume shop shocked to discover that Pepe is within helping himself to his wares. Due to the bad timing of a friendly feline she finds herself locked in with the amorous Le Pew, who mistakes her for a fellow skunk when a bottle of white hair dye is tipped over and its contents leave a stripe down her back and tail. So begins the chase…one that has a surprising outcome when Pepe gets what he wants.

Mel Blanc naturally provides the voice of Pepe and the other characters within the short but there is a surprisingly large and hilarious chunk where there is no dialogue, as Le Pew attempts to coax his intended love out of a glass case. This scene while intact in the video below is usually edited out when shown on TV…for a rather obvious reason.

So please join us and Toon In and enjoy 1949’s For Scent-imental Reasons!

Looney Toons – For Scentimental Reasons by JomJul

The Looney Tunes Show, Season 1, Vol. 2 on DVD

Your favorite Looney Tunes characters are back in an updated version of their adventures, The Looney Tunes Show. I was a little concerned by this reboot. The web was pretty much split on the character design and concerns that the show would take their favorite characters in directions they wouldn’t like. I have watched the show and I have enjoyed the writing and characterization. It is not a replacement for the original shorts that I love, but it is really great to see some of my favorite characters getting some new life breathed into them.

This DVD contains 4 episodes from the first season of the show. I am still not a huge fan of these bite size releases on DVD. I prefer full season releases when I can get them, but in this case it does not look like I will have that choice. That aside, the episodes included are great fun. You get:

Monster Talent – with Daffy Duck and Gossamer

Reunion – with Bugs Bunny, Marvin the Martian and Daffy

Casa de Calma – with Bugs and Daffy

Devil Dog – with the Tasmanian Devil, Bugs Bunny, Daffy and many more

You also get cartoons within episodes and some fun music videos. Which is a lot of entertainment for 12 bucks. So if you like the show or more importantly have kids who enjoy the show (perhaps they have exhausted all the original shorts), pick up a copy of The Looney Tunes Show, Season 1, Vol. 2 on DVD today.