Werewolf - Power Records

Retro Records: The Curse of The Werewolf!

I’m not sure when you were first introduced to the concept of the Werewolf. But as in fact I’ve mentioned before – I learned all about it thanks to this 1975 poster. One that at the tender age of three years old I pulled from a box of Sugar Crisp!

Images courtesy of the Classic Movie Monsters Blog.

Now I didn’t really get bit with the Werewolf bug until seeing 1941’s The Wolf Man. Starring some rather legendary actors. Like Bela Lugosi, Claude Rains, Ralph Bellamy, and of course Lon Chaney, Jr.

After catching that film on TV during the Late, Late Show I was hooked. While I was a Universal Monster fan from an early age. It would be not just The Wolf Man but anything Werewolf related that would demand my attention. Which is probably how I ended up watching 1981’s An American Werewolf in London at only nine years old!

Which naturally bring us around to our Retro Records offering for today. A 1974 Power Records 45 rpm entitled “The Curse of the Werewolf!”. In addition it features artwork by Mike Ploog and even Gene Colan. I should add that it at the very least looks like Gene Colan provided the artwork for the scenes involving Dracula.

Furthermore – this is a record that could only have come from the 70s! Like some of the others we have shared such as Kojak as well as Man-Thing. The story is rather dark to say the very least.
Werewolf

So without further ado join us on Retro Records as we listen to The Curse of the Werewolf!

[Via] Mister GrayMan

Phantom of the Opera Production Still (1925)

A huge thanks to our friends over at Monster Crazy for this incredible production still for the silent horror classic, the Phantom of the Opera. Released in 1925 and starring Mary Philbin and the legendary Lon Chaney, the actor who was billed as the man of a 1,000 faces, the theatrical adaption of the literary masterpiece by Gaston Leroux continues to impress movie fans.

It was re-released in 1929 as a sound picture, using Vitaphone and disks by Western Electric. It is estimated that 40% of the film had to be re-shot for synchronous sound while the remainder of the film was either dubbed over or had music added. During the re-shoots Lon Chaney was not available so Universal Pictures dubbed dialogue over the scenes featuring the Phantom’s shadow. It is believed that Phillips Smalley (A Day at the Races) was hired for these readings.

The Phantom of the Opera was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry in 1998 as being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”