Lost In Space Soundtrack - christopher Lennertz - Lakeshore Records

Lost In Space Soundtrack Released By Lakeshore Records!

Friends, last week we had exciting news with the upcoming 3-CD release of The Storyteller. That excitement builds to a new level as Lakeshore Records has released Christopher Lennertz’s Lost in Space soundtrack too. My spoiler free review of the first episode was quick to praise the acting and effects. I would add that Netflix’s worthy reboot of the original ’60s TV show shines brightly with the score as well. Showrunner Zack Estrin chose wisely when picking Christopher Lennertz to compose the Lost in Space soundtrack!

Lost in Space Soundtrack - Christopher Lennertz - IMDB

Image courtesy of IMDB.

Lennertz is no stranger to composing stunning music for films and television. At this moment he has a staggering 123 credits to his name. Some notable projects from his career include The Horde, Horrible Bosses, Agent Carter, 176 episodes of Supernatural as well as the spinoff Ghostfacers. I certainly feel it is safe to say he knows his way around all manner of genres.

At the end of the review for that first episode. I made a small comment about hoping the score would be worthy of the 1998 feature film. After having watched the series and Lakeshore Records kindly letting me review the Lost in Space soundtrack itself. I can in all honesty say that Christopher has exceeded the wonderful work by Bruce Broughton. Furthermore Lennertz has crafted a score that manages to convey the emotional gist of the series.
Lost in Space Soundtrack - Robot and Will Robinson

The heroic swell heard in Main Titles, naturally builds off John Williams original theme. Parts of that iconic theme plays throughout the score for the Lost in Space soundtrack. While William’s original theme might have inspired the composer. Lennertz is solely responsible for delivering an exceptionally moving and exciting score. Friends, he deserves accolades and awards on this!

From the pulse pounding start of To The Chariot that deftly slides into a softer touch before returning to a thrilling score. Without being jarring of course. Or the absolutely moving combination of strings and piano at the beginning of The Waterfall, which in turn becomes mysterious and threatening. Lennertz with the Philharmonia Orchestra, have delivered a rousing and beautiful soundtrack. While I am indeed attempting to avoid spoilers with the names of the tracks. I will go on record stating that Will and the Robot as well as Flowers-Father And Son are two of my favorites.
Lost in Space soundtrack - John and Will Robinson

With all due respect to Lakeshore Records, I think that Zack Estrin says it better than I could. This is courtesy of the liner notes for the soundtrack:
“Much like the Robinsons themselves, there’s an underlying sense of hope to the music here. It’s a sonic rollercoaster full of fun and heart…”
Lost In Space Soundtrack - Chariot

Now the great news is Lakeshore Records have already released the soundtrack. It actually debuted at the same time as the Netflix series went live. Now you can of course hop on over to the Lakeshore’s official site and purchase it in any number of ways. I would however suggest you go the iTunes route. Why? That is because you will indeed get more than the standard 22 tracks. By going through iTunes you will get 7 more bonus tracks!

Are you ready to hear a medley of Christopher Lennert’s Lost in Space soundtrack?

[Via] Lakeshore Records

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Retroist Scoreboard: Beware the Ides of May – From Raiders To Reynolds

Mid-May has been crazy, so apologies for the Retroist Scoreboard taking an unscheduled break. But hey, there’s some seriously good stuff to talk about now that we’re back.

Intrada Records has released a new 3-CD edition of the late, great Jerry Goldsmith’s score from Poltergeist II. Now, you may well be asking yourself how one squeezes a 3-CD set out of a single movie that doesn’t even last three hours, but this set is a real treat for Goldsmith afficionados.

Poltergeist II

The three-disc set presents, across two discs, the distinctly different digital and analog mixes of the complete score, along with a bonus third disc presenting several key cues from the film as Goldsmith originally scored them, featuring hair-raisingly unearthly choral performances that were frequently left off the sound mix in the final movie. Best of all, Intrada isn’t charging an arm and a leg just because of the disc count, so even if you have a previous release of this soundtrack, your wallet will not be forever haunted by upgrading to this release.

Poltergeist II

Quartet Records has released a very limited edition (1,000 copies) of Frank de Vol’s scores from two ’70s Burt Reynolds movies, Hustle and The Longest Yard, on a single disc. The Hustle score, among its other selling points, has the best track title this author has ever seen on a compact disc of any genre, “Phychedelicatessen”.

Hustle

In a rare instance of what’s normally thought of as a soundtrack label dipping its toes into the mainstream, Varese Sarabande has released The Very Best Of Peter Cetera, decidedly not a soundtrack release…or is it? Crowded with tracks such as “The Glory Of Love”, “Daddy’s Girl”, “After All” and “Stay With Me”, all of which were prominently featured in hit movies, this isn’t such an “out of left field” release for Varese after all – late ’80s Hollywood saw Cetera as a soundtrack (and publicity) goldmine.

Peter Cetera

June 2nd will see the release of a new vinyl pressing of John Williams’ legendary Raiders of the Lost Ark score, this time with additional material that wasn’t featured on the 1981 LP. If you have the 2008 CD box set, there isn’t anything you haven’t already heard here, but this 2-record set from Concord is an eye-catching addition to your vinyl collection. Support for “Indy” music, indeed!

Raiders of the Lost Ark - CD Release

Track List from the CD release.

Looking even further ahead, word has hit the internet, by way of composer W.G. “Snuffy” Walden, that we might be getting a long, long overdue release of music from The West Wing this summer, while September will see the release of one, if not two, albums of music from Showtime’s revival of Twin Peaks. And La-La Land Records, almost the de facto label for Star Trek music these days, is apparently in early negotiations with CBS to discuss a soundtrack release for Star Trek: Discovery…even though it’s not known who will be doing the music. This is shaping up to be an exciting year for fans of TV soundtrack music…

…and we’re not even halfway through the year yet. Buckle up, because there may be even more soundtrack news very soon.

Speaking of the legendary score by John Williams for Raiders of the Lost Ark – why not listen to the composer discuss his work?

[Via] Maestro Sanaboti

V'ger - Star Trek the Motion Picture

Retroist Scoreboard 3-14-17: V’ger, you’re my knight in shining armor

Soundtrack fans, we’re in yet another unexpectedly meaty week of wonders, so let’s waste no time in diving right in.

La-La Land Records, as previously announced, is now taking orders for their limited edition (1500 copies) double LP vinyl pressing of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, returning Jerry Goldsmith’s magnum opus to turntables for the first time in nearly 40 years, this time with the complete score spread across four sides. (The CD box set has even more music, if you’re after music instead of a display piece: Goldsmith scored half the movie before coming up with the iconic Enterprise theme, which was later repurposed as the theme for Star Trek: The Next Generation, and the CD edition presents the complete score as heard in the movie plus what basically amounts to an unused alternate soundtrack.)
V'ger

While the first Star Trek movie is returning to vinyl, another classic movie is, incredibly, only just now making its way to CD thanks to Varese Sarabande, which is presenting Dave Grusin’s music from On Golden Pond, interspersed with dialogue from the movie (in some cases, quite lengthy chunks of dialogue).

Varese also has a trio of limited editions now available: an “encore” re-pressing of Elmer Bernstein’s score from Disney’s The Black Cauldron, limited to just 1000 copies for those who missed out on the last limited edition issue of this title.

For fans of high-octane action movies (and their music), there’s a new edition of Basil Poledouris’ music from the Steven Segal flick Under Siege 2: Dark Territory, more than doubling the running time of the original 1995 CD release. Even the movie’s source music is included as bonus tracks. What’s source music? Ask me that again in a minute.

And finally, John Williams’ score from the 1990’s Stanley & Iris gets a limited edition CD release of 3,000 copies, but that’s not all: tucked into the open space left by that movie’s score is a second Williams score hitting CD for the first time, 1972’s Pete ‘n’ Tillie. The two movies’ music are a good fit to share a CD: both are heartfelt relationship movies, and hey, it’s John Williams.

So…about source music: it’s a wonderful thing when original source music winds up as a bonus track on a CD…of course, that’s assuming that the director isn’t married to his temp track. Confused yet? That’s why we have another slice of the Retroist Scoreboard Glossary this week.

The Retroist Scoreboard Glossary: How The Sausage Gets Made
Additional Music – you’ll see this in movie and especially TV credits these days…often in small print. Particularly with the breakneck production timetable of television, but also with movies, composers must hire extra help to ghost-write the sheer amount of music needed within that timetable. Some of today’s biggest names were yesterday’s up-and-coming “additional music” composers: the ubiquitous Bear McCreary (10 Cloverfield Lane, The Walking Dead, Agents Of SHIELD, Outlander, Black Sails, Da Vinci’s Demons) got his break composing “additional music” for the 2003 Battlestar Galactica miniseries, whose primary composer moved on, leaving McCreary to take over the hourly series, making his career in the process. Due to the structure of CD release contracts with the primary composer, this additional music may or may not appear on an official release, leaving music from memorable scenes off the table. (Thus was the fate of the pivotal, Joel Goldsmith-composed “Flight Of The Phoenix” scene from Star Trek: First Contact, which was left off of the original 1996 soundtrack release at the label’s demand, simply because it wasn’t by primary composer Jerry Goldsmith.) In a few cases, the assistant composers may release their material as a composer promo.

Music+FX Track or Stem – a special mix of a movie or TV show’s music score and sound effects, prepared so that local voice artists in various parts of the world can do a language dub without the original actors’ voices in the background. Particularly with older films, this may be the closest we come to having a film’s original music tapes; it’s exceedingly rare to see a CD release of a Music+FX mix, but not unheard of (i.e. La-La Land’s “archival” release of Jerry Goldsmith’s rare score from The Satan Bug). Music+FX mixes are more often the domain of bootleggers.

Source Music – composers may be called upon to create “source music” for a scene in which a movie’s characters can hear that song in question from some on-screen source – a radio, a jukebox, a band on stage, to name a few examples. (Contrast this against the movie’s score, which the characters do not hear.) Some reissue producers go out of their way to include specially composed source music, particularly if it’s been the subject of “what was that song…?” debates for years and years. In some cases, source music is a piece of music from a movie’s songtrack.

Spotting – a process during pre-production of a movie or TV show in which the composer sits in on a screening of a rough edit to discuss the timing, placement and emotional thrust of the music with the director and/or editor(s), sometimes using temp tracks as a guide. (These meetings are called spotting sessions.) Once spotting is complete, the process of composing actually begins, though some composers may discover at a very late stage that the director’s ideas on spotting has changed, and their music has been tracked over a completely different scene…or has been replaced with a piece of the temp track.

Temp Track – a “temporary track” is often assembled, during a movie’s editing process, by the director and/or the film editor to track scenes in a movie that has no score yet. Temp tracks are often cobbled together from classical pieces or other movie soundtracks, and a composer hired to score a movie will often be asked to compose music with a similar feel…without actually duplicating it note-for-note, of course. The history of film music is rife with instances of directors falling in love with their temp tracks to the point that they either don’t hire a composer, or reject a specially commissioned score when it doesn’t live up to the director’s expectations (perhaps the most famous specimen of this category being Alex North’s unused original score for 2001: a space odyssey). Temp tracks are controversial in film music, whether for the perception that they limit a composer’s creativity, or for the not-limited-to-Kubrick phenomenon which plagues composers to this day (just this year, Johann Johannson’s score for Arrival was disqualified from Oscar contention because of the prominence of Max Richter’s composition, “On The Nature Of Daylight”, in key scenes of the movie – a holdover from the temp track that the director felt couldn’t be improved upon, costing his composer a nomination).

Tracking – once a composer has turned in a completed score, that music is at the mercy of the film’s director and/or editor(s), and may not appear where it was originally spotted. The music may be chopped up, edited and tracked in a different place entirely, such as >em>Star Wars Episode IStar Wars Episode III. Additionally, licensed or specially commissioned songs may be tracked into scenes, replacing sections of more traditional scoring (Ray Parker Jr.’s memorable song was tracked into as many scenes of Ghostbusters as possible late in editing, leaving significant portions of Elmer Bernstein’s score on the cutting room floor).

Watch and listen to the Superman movie theme on vinyl

Superman Vinyl

I’m just going to leave this little video here for you all, just in case you have either a longing to hear the iconic John Williams Superman theme, or a desire to watch a record spinning at 45 revolutions per minute. Hell, this video has you covered if you want to do both at the same time, it’s that good!

That first paragraph probably sounds like I’m being sarcastic but, I promise, I’m not. I’d happily listen to the whole movie soundtrack in this way.