Masters of the Universe

Retro Records: Masters Of The Universe (1983)

Welcome back, friends. For this offering on Retro Records we are going with an absolutely epic LP. The 1983 Masters of the Universe record produced by Kid Stuff. Not only that but this was released in two different versions. The more common album cover you see at the top of the post in addition to a phono picture disc.

Image courtesy of the T3 Universe Blog.

Image courtesy of the T3 Universe Blog.


A very big thanks to the T3 Universe Blog for the personal images of those stunning picture discs.
Masters of the Universe - Phono Disc Side B - T3 Universe

Now bear in mind by the end of 1982, the Masters of the Universe toy line had already been hugely popular. So it naturally made sense that the merchandising arm start to spread out. I ask you, what child of the early 80s wouldn’t want to hear the adventures on Eternia? And Kid Stuff certainly ran with the early storylines of the series. In particular I mean the fantasy aspects of Masters of the Universe.

Image courtesy of He-Man.Org

Image courtesy of He-Man.Org

However this record was produced after the vintage DC Comics miniseries and classic Filmation series it seems.
Masters of the Universe - DC Comics

As He-Man is no mere barbarian in the jungles of Eternia as presented in the minicomics that came with the toys. But the alter-ego of Prince Adam. On the other hand instead of visiting the Cave of Power to transform he holds aloft the Power Sword. Having said that though you won’t hear Cringer or Battle Cat speaking or such on this record. In fact it’s like Kid Stuff combined elements of all three versions for their story.

Did I forget to mention the first record includes a five minute Masters of the Universe theme song?

So pour yourself a bowl of your favorite cereal and join us as we listen to the adventures of the Masters of the Universe!

[Videos Via] Cash Presley

Toon In: The Lone Ranger – The Fly (1966)

Welcome back friends to another installment of Toon In, a point in the week we can shine the spotlight on an animated short or cartoon series worthy of your viewing. This week we present and episode from the 1966 animated The Lone Ranger TV series by Engel films entitled “The Fly”

To be absolutely honest I wasn’t aware of this CBS animated series until this morning. The Lone Ranger cartoon from my youth that I am familiar with was the 1980 Filmation produced The Tarzan/Lone Ranger Adventure Hour!

[Via] Nick J. Cort

The 1966 animated series has a wonderful sense of style to it and I would be willing to bet that the legendary Alex Toth had a hand in its design. It also appears to have taken a page from another popular 1965 CBS television program, The Wild Wild West. With our episode The Fly, we find Tonto and the Lone Ranger mixing it up with…well…when you get down to it they are kind of like Ninjas, who are attempting to steal the United States Government’s latest invention which happens to be a multiple rocket launcher.

The Lone Ranger - Ninjas

Can the Lone Ranger and Tonto put an end to the threat of The Fly? Toon In and find out for yourself!

[Via] Cartoon Jam

Wow…wait until you see what he finds at the bottom of that slide.

Warner Bros. Releases Filmation’s Tarzan, Lord Of The Jungle: Season One On June 14, 2016!

On September 11th, 1976 Filmation debuted Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle on CBS where it lasted for four seasons. Now on June 14th we will get the first 16 episodes of that animated series when Warner Bros. Home Entertainment releases the Complete Season One to DVD.

Tarzan Lord of the Jungle

The classic Filmation version of Tarzan skews closer to the the stories that Edgar Rice Burroughs penned back in 1912, when Tarzan of the Apes was first published in The All-Story magazine and then in book format in 1914.

Tarzan_all-story_Oct_1912

[Via] Chad Pittman

In total the Filmation Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle had 36 episodes produced and I bet if this first volume does well we will most certainly see the remaining episodes released. In fact this year is the 40th Anniversary of the animated show and of course arrives a month before the new live-action film The Legend of Tarzan hits the big screens this Summer!

Warner Bros. Pictures

From the Warner Bros. Press Release:
“Just in time for Father’s Day and the theatrical release, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will release the long awaited animated series that aired when Saturday Morning Cartoons reigned supreme. Available on DVD on June 14, 2016, Tarzan, Lord Of The Jungle: Complete Season One was created by the Filmation Studio for CBS and follows the animated adventures of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ ape man from the 1970’s. The two-disc collectors set includes all 16 episodes from the series’ first season, and is priced to own at $19.98 SRP.

As the opening narration explains: “The jungle: Here I was born; and here my parents died when I was but an infant. I would have soon perished, too, had I not been found by a kindly she-ape named Kala, who adopted me as her own and taught me the ways of the wild. I learned quickly, and grew stronger each day, and now I share the friendship and trust of all jungle animals. The jungle is filled with beauty, and danger; and lost cities filled with good, and evil. This is my domain, and I protect those who come here; for I am Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle!”

“Tarzan, Lord Of The Jungle was animated the old fashion way, with many hours of hand drawn stills,” said Mary Ellen Thomas, Vice President Family & Animation Marketing and Partner Brands. “They don’t make animation like this anymore, and we are really proud to be releasing this timeless classic just in time for the July release of Tarzan in theaters.”

Retro Records: Groovie Goolies (1970)

Drak Pack
In my youth when it came to horror related cartoons, for my money nothing could top Hanna-Barbera’s 1980 Saturday morning cartoon series the Drak Pack!

[Via] Muttley16

Although my love for that particular TV show didn’t mean I wasn’t ready at the drop of the hat to watch anything that had some connection to something supernatural, whether that be Scooby-Doo, Goober and the Ghost Chasers, or of course the Groovie Goolies. Although in my neck of the woods it was never on at a regular time, it was syndicated of course but it would always air on a Sunday afternoon…well…sometimes it would air on a Sunday afternoon. It was a gigantic letdown to get home from church and plop down in front of the TV, anxiously waiting for the tube to warm up and see…Wagon Train.

[Via] Retro Heroes

Wolfie actually kind of scares me.

Wolfie actually kind of scares me.

In 1970 RCA Victor produced this Groovy Goolies LP featuring ten songs:
Save Your Good Lovin’ For Me, Bumble Goolie, We Go So Good Together, Frankie, Goolie Get-Together (Theme), First Annual Semi-Formal Combination Celebration Meet-the-Monster Population Party, Spend Some Time Together, Cling, Clang, Goolie Garden, One, Two, Three.

Sadly this is the only song I could find online but it’s an enjoyable bit of fun and Drac, Frankie, and Wolfie should help get you into the Halloween spirit.

[Via] Henry Kyb

Crashed Pilots: Bravo!

In 1988, Filmation was sold to the L’oreal company. In 1989, L’oreal closed the studio. At the time of the closure, a spinoff to the Bravestarr series was in the works, one episode of which had been fully animated. This spinoff was originally titled “The Quest of the Prairie People”, then “Bravo!”, then “Bravo!: The Quest of the Prairie People”. While it was never aired, it did make it onto DVD in 2007, as a bonus feature on one of the Bravestarr DVDs.

The connection between Bravo! and Bravestarr is minimal at best, merely the titular Prairie People. The plot has nothing in common, and even the overall atmosphere is different. Bravo! seems intended for a notably younger audience and is very much a comedy, in sharp contrast
to Bravestarr’s focus on action & drama.

The story takes place in a stone-age setting, and feels a lot like The Flintstone Kids. The villains in the story are a group of humanoid plants (mostly cacti), led by a caveman, and the evil weed/mastermind Bitterroot. The heroes are the Prairie People, led by Bravo, a witch, some cavemen, and an oversized (but highly intellectual) blue goat.

As the story begins, the Prairie People have travelled into the past to fight Bitterroot and his Weed Riders. After trouncing their foes, they then meet Goatah and Fossill, who in turn lead them to the witch woman Leedra and the cave people. After a brief interlude where Bitterroot screams at the Weed Riders while some rats play cards, Ruckus leads the Weed Riders to attack the home of the cave people. Ruckus goes and steals the Prairie People’s Trek Ark (a flying car made out of rock), leaving the Weed Riders free to attack. Leedra and Grumpa (the Prairie People’s resident magician) start arguing about the best type of spell to use against their foes, while everyone else simply joins the fray, everyone except the titular Bravo. Bravo runs off to recover the Trek Ark and rescue Teeta (but winds up being rescued by her instead). The two of them return with the Trek Ark and use it’s jet engines (yes, rocks have jets, apparently…) to send the evil weeds flying into a volcano. Meanwhile, Leedra and Grumpa are still arguing about spells and haven’t cast a single one, a fact which doesn’t dawn on them until they hear the others talk about how the fight’s over. They do get to take part in the action though when Bitterroot shows up. Showing that they learned their lesson (at least for now), they both blast him with their magic & send him flying off into the sunset.

It’s unfortunate that the Filmation studio was shut down before this series made it into full production, it looks like it would have been a fun show, perfect for saturday mornings.

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