Enterprise

A Little Bit Of The Enterprise

A lot has changed over the years. My hairline, my waistline, the number of bills I have to pay. But not my deep and abiding love for Star Trek: The Next Generation. A unique occasion has arrived to compare what’s probably the very first piece of TNG merchandise I ever shelled out money for, to the most recent addition to my collection…which are nearly the same size.

Enterprise
On the left, we have the Enterprise 1701-D from the Eaglemoss Star Trek Starship Collection. Eaglemoss is a UK published specializing in collectible “partworks” – magazines with goodies. Those signing up as subscribers to the Starship Collection get two $20 models a month, each with magazines detailing the histories of each ship both on-screen and off. That’s an awesome idea…and way too rich for my blood. But I did avail myself of a recent sale on Eaglemoss’ site to pick up a couple of additions to my own Starfleet.

On the right, we have my very well-worn die-cast metal Enterprise 1701-D, released by Galoob in 1987 alongside the earliest episodes of TNG’s first season. Now, given that I was a teenager when both show and ship arrived, you’d think this ship would have occupied a place of honor on a shelf somewhere, but no – full disclosure: it has been flown around many a room, virtually every place I’ve ever lived, and has almost as many battle scars as my old die-cast Kenner Star Wars ships. It is much loved…and it’s 30 years old this year.

It’s easy to see that there are worlds of difference between the two – advances in paint application and manufacturing abound over a three-decade time period. The Eaglemoss Enterprise has much more precise detail, down to the hull-plating “aztecing” that many a modelmaker (or admirer) obsesses over. The clear bits that are supposed to be glowy? They’re clear and, if you hold the Enterprise up to a light source, glowy.

The Galoob Enterprise is nothing to sneeze at. Yes, there are visible screws, and much of the detail is part of the mold rather than part of the paint job. But the amount of detail that’s there is impressive and accurate. It’s also worth noting that a lot of the Enterprise’s legendary “aztecing” wasn’t present in the earliest days of the show: it couldn’t be seen until a new four-foot model was constructed for filming roughly halfway into TNG’s on-air lifespan. The bluish-gray of the 1987 Enterprise reflects what we saw on screen.
Enterprise 1701 D

Oh, and the Galoob Enterprise can separate its saucer section – the Eaglemoss Enterprise can’t do that, full-stop. (Which is okay – saucer separation happened three whole times in nearly 200 episodes, four if you count the save-our-skins maneuver in the movie Star Trek: Generations; spoiler: it didn’t save the ship on that occasion.)

Eaglemoss’ model is equipped with a display stand that seems, well, a little on the delicate side. The ship is also on the delicate side: the saucer and main body are a lightweight metal, but the engines with their transparent components are plastic. This Enterprise would probably suffer critical damage if dropped. It’s meant to spend its time flying on a display shelf. The Galoob Enterprise has no stand – you’re on your own there – but has obviously survived some rough flying. It’s a hefty die-cast metal with no plastic.

A Galoob Enterprise in good condition will probably set your Starfleet fleet-building budget back a few credits, especially if it’s still in the package. The Eaglemoss model will also do this, but you get a much more delicate (but also possibly more accurate) model out of the deal. If you plunk down money for the subscription, there’s also a lot more where it came from; Galoob’s toy license for TNG was short-lived, and its die-cast Enterprise flies alone.
Enterprise

The good news is, they’re both the same beautiful ship.

If you’re not flying it past the camera or just your face and making whooshing warp drive sounds, what’s a little Enterprise for?

Transporter

Transporter Goes Wrong In This UK National Power Ad!

Captain Kirk and the crew of the starship Enterprise have faced many grave dangers. Quite a few of them avoided thanks to the transporter. As well as the talents of Lieutenant commander Montgomery Scott. As I’ve mentioned on more than one occasion on The Retroist – Mr. Scott was always one of my favorites.

Equally at ease on an away mission as keeping the engine room running at peak performance.
Transporter - Mr. Scott

Or even taking command of the USS Enterprise when need be.

On the other hand Scotty could take care of himself when action was called for as well. In particular with uppity Klingons mouthing off about the Enterprise.

Mr. Scott was honest and hardworking as well as loyal. These traits sum up what James Doohan brought to the character. Throughout the original series and perhaps even more so in the films – we had a chance to see the more humorous side of Scotty. Although perhaps none more so than with this 1990 TV commercial for the UK’s now defunct National Power. Check it out for yourself and see what shenanigans occur when Kirk presses Scotty for more power.

[Via] Captain Simpson

That is seriously one of the more humorous commercials I’ve had the pleasure of watching. In particular I enjoyed the reactions of the two away team members that are stranded. I would also add that it appears that both William Shatner and James Doohan had fun while shooting the ad.

Don’t you think that Kirk might behave himself better though if this transporter body mix-up were to take place…yeah…probably not.

Now that you’ve enjoyed the comedy of a transporter mishap. This is the part where I remind you…it wouldn’t be that funny in real life.

[Via] Cole

Wow. That was something of a downer, huh? So to lift our spirits – here is Mr. Scott with a special message.

Star Trek Phaser Battle

This 1976 Star Trek Phaser Battle Game Is Amazing!

The other night while digging up some information on a future post. I came across Mego’s 1976 Star Trek Phaser Battle game. An electronic ‘handheld game’ that is just stunningly amazing. Placing the Player on the bridge of the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) to seek out and destroy enemy Klingon vessels.
Star Trek Phaser Battle

Of course it’s not like Mego wasn’t known in the 70s for making quality Star Trek products. Starting in 1974 they began manufacturing 8″ figures. The line of toys included characters that you would naturally assume they would release. Like Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy, Mr. Scott, Lt. Uhura, and a Klingon.

Which resulted in the incredibly rare 1975 USS Enterprise Gift Set!

[Via] Trek Movie

Doing a little research this morning I was able to find some interesting facts about the Star Trek Phaser Battle game. It was rather expensive for the time. In 1976 it was being sold for $69.99 which would cost a little under $300 today. So obviously this electronic game had a hefty price tag. It was also quite large – measuring 13″ x 13″ by 16″.

Viewing the vintage television commercial below however…I have to say I think it would be worth it. Take a moment and check out all of the bells and whistles this game had to offer.

[Via] FyberOptic

Thanks to the Handheld Museum we can also scope out the front and back of the game box. While I really enjoy the back of the box – used at the top of the post, with Kirk, Chekov, and Sulu. I admit I get a chuckle out of Mr. Spock’s rather disdainful look at the child. At least that is how I read it.

Box art images courtesy of the Handheld Museum.


“Judging by your score, it is only logical to point out that a game of tic-tac-toe is more your speed.”

While the commercial for the Star Trek Phaser Battle game is impressive. How would you like to see it in action?

[Via] Sly DC

1982 Imagic Documentary!

Imagic Logo
I’m kind of riding on the Atlantis TV Commercial from yesterday but I thought this was just too cool of a documentary not to share. Thanks to Scottith Games over on YouTube we have this 2 part documentary on the Imagic game corporation from the 1982 PBS television show entitled Enterprise. In this documentary you’ll not only see the Imagic team discussing the creation of Atlantis but you’ll get a behind the scenes look at the Golden Age of game programming.

Star Trek Inflatable Captain’s Chair

This just found its way into my inbox this morning and if it was a little bit larger, I would have ordered it immediately…

Here is the description straight from ThinkGeek:

ThinkGeek is proud to announce the latest addition to their line of officially licensed Star Trek collectibles The Star Trek Inflatable Captain’s Chair comes straight from the bridge of the original U.S.S. Enterprise, and joins other popular ThinkGeek collectibles such as the Star Trek Pizza Cutter and the Star Trek Electronic Door Chime.

“Captain Kirk once said ‘Galloping around the cosmos is a game for the young,’ ” said Ty Liotta, head of ThinkGeek’s GeekLabs. “We took that idea and created a product young fans of Star Trekwould crave for their own adventures.”

Designed with wee geeks in mind, the Star Trek Inflatable Captain’s Chair supports those ages 3 to small adult (maximum weight of 120 lbs).  The arms of the chair feature series-accurate representations of the buttons and controls available to Captain Kirk.  When inflated, the chair measures approximately 27.75” high x 29.25” wide x 18” deep.

Got a small Trek fan in your life? Pick one up today.