Allison Doesn’t Know Jack

Actually, she does. Because she does stuff like this! :-)

Ever since my first gameplay video, for the Nintendo Entertainment System game American Gladiators, I’ve been wanting to do another gameplay video. I wanted it to be as perfect as the first one, because yeah, it was pretty freakin’ perfect. And awesome. Did I mention perfect? Did I mention awesome? It was perfectly awesome.

Yes, that is an expression.

Jack TV

One of my favorite “party” games (and by “party,” I mean “party of one,” because no one would play against me, because mad television-watching skills) was You Don’t Know Jack Television, and one of the sibling games, You Don’t Know Jack Movies. Both were gifted to me by a high school boyfriend back in the early 2000s (it was actually in 2000). The relationship may not have lasted, but I played the games for years until I lost track of the CD-ROMs about a decade ago when my family moved. I’d tried to find an online version, and eventually, I lost track of attempts to locate the game. On chance, I had started looking for the game again earlier this year, and was fine if I had to pay for a download or even CD-ROM version. I knew that may not be feasible, having a Windows 8 laptop (that keeps trying to prompt me to set myself up with Windows 10), but I was determined. And when I found it on both Steam AND Amazon as downloads, it was destiny.

Nice to know what constitutes as “destiny” in my world and thinking.

I found both the Television and Movie games as downloads for $2.99 each on Amazon, and I knew they were supposed to be mine forever.

To come back into playing these games after many years away from them was the equivalent of greeting an old friend. I hadn’t lost my edge with the Television game, and was slightly rusty with the Movie game, but I got over that quickly. Turns out I’m none-too-shabby with games from 1997, with questions about movies and television stuff?that was older, and I hadn’t played the game in ten years. I’m impressive, wouldn’t you say?

So, without further ado (ok, fine, a little ado…or is it “much ado about nothing”?), my second gameplay video for Retroist, as I play the 1997 game You Don’t Know Jack Television. I’ll let you know right off the bat that I refrained from talking during the video, due to the potential to miss some cheesy jokes. This really is a fun game, and I hope you enjoy watching it as much as I enjoyed playing it.

First, some technical specs…

Screenshot (113)

The game was recorded with Open Broadcaster Software (OBS), and compressed into a smaller, easier to upload file using Freemake Video Converter. I also used Freemake to cut out a short section where I hit pause.

Oh, and that one insanely high score you’ll see at the end. I’m just that good.

Enjoy!

Allison is a lover of video games from her childhood and teenage years, especially when she can still master them in her 30s the way she did in her teens. She loves trivia games, and as you can clearly see, You Don’t Know Jack is a beloved game. If you’d like to see more of what she does best, come on over to her blog, Allison’s Written Words, and follow her blog on Facebook, just so you’ll never be out of touch with the not-so-relevant stuff she writes about. She can also be found on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut.

She doesn’t mind being insulted by the host on these games.

 

Oil’s Well (Sierra, 1983)

Oil's Well

In 1983’s Oil’s Well by Sierra (before they were Sierra Online), players control a drill bit and must “devour” pellets of oil. Your drill bit can be broken by hitting land mines and various critters roaming the tunnels beneath the earth. The game is almost identical to another popular game released for home computers in 1983, Datamost’s Ardy the Aardvark, which apparently was based on the 1982 arcade game Anteater.

The dinosaur seen above is Slater the Petrosaur, as seen in the 1990 PC version of the manual. Slater has essentially nothing to do with the game. I guess they just needed a cute mascot to put in the manual for marketing purposes.

Oil’s Well was released for the Apple II, Atari 8-bit, ColecoVision, Commodore 64, MSX, and the IBM PC. I spent some time playing the Apple II version this week and it’s really addictive. Your drill bit is controlled by the joystick, while the button retracts it quickly. If a critter touches any part of your drill bit it breaks, so getting all the oil located on the bottom levels is quite challenging.

2014-02-06 10.27.54 - Copy

My current “retrocomputing desk” consists of two Raspberry Pi computers, a Commodore 64, an Apple IIe, and a MiST (Amiga and Atari ST) machine. I had hoped to try out a few more games last night but all I did was play Oil’s Well for a couple of hours.

Here’s some footage of the Commodore 64 version of Oil’s Well…

…and here’s some footage from the 1990 MS-DOS version. Keep an eye out for Slater!

The Book of Adventure Games

I stumbled upon this book last year at one of those city-wide book sales. The adventure games referred to in the book’s title are text adventures. Along with several articles in regards to text adventures, the book contains maps, hints, and walk-thrus for approximately 80 different computer games. It’s a shame that I didn’t stumble across this book until 2011 — I would have loved to have owned in back in the 1980s.