Let’s Play 1984’s The Temple Of Doom Board Game!

By the time that Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom hit theaters back on May 23, 1984. I was impatiently counting the days up until it’s release. When my Father and I finally had the chance to see it, I was all set to join Indiana Jones again and brave that Temple of Doom.

Film Trailers

Of course it helped that television ads were all over the place. It must be remembered as well that Raiders of the Lost Ark kind of took everyone by surprise in 1981. It seemed like the studio was truly doing its best to get the word out about Temple of Doom.

Having said that I must admit that I do not ever recall seeing the Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom board game back in the day. Thankfully this matter was corrected when the Arkadia Retrocade received a copy of it a few months back.

Joining me for this special event was none other than my fellow author on The Retroist, PLCary.

I must point out the nice design of the Temple of Doom board itself.
Temple of Doom

Each Player also receives a little board that connects to the main board – which features exciting moments from the film as well. Such as the plane crash, waterfall, the palace and of course Club Obi Wan!

After a go with the spinner, a Player must travel the full number of steps. At the very beginning you must choose to take the shorter path which is more dangerous. Or the longer path giving you more opportunities to avoid landing on a danger – sending you back precious steps or even to the beginning.

Dotted across the board are symbols featuring both Indy’s hat and whip and the visage of Mola Ram. When landing on these symbols a Player spins the spinner – if it matches the symbol you have landed upon, two outcomes take place. A match of symbols while on Indy’s hat means a Player can move a piece up to 3 spaces. Where as if you match while on Mola Ram’s symbol – you lose your next turn…probably trying to avoid having your heart ripped out.

Another key point is that a Player isn’t allowed to jump over another of their pieces. Which means there are moments in fact during the game where you are stuck. An opposing Player is allowed to land on your piece – placing your piece where they just were. An act by and large that can become beneficial in certain cases, especially when you enter the temple itself.
Temple of Doom

After navigating the treacherous temple, avoiding the sulfurous pitfalls. By foot or using the stairwells as shortcuts, you begin to move Indy, Willie, and Short Round to the appropriate colored mine carts. A Player must get all three of their playing pieces on the cart before they can race for the finish line.

In our game, while PLCary pulled ahead at the beginning – I made it through the mines first. But on the negative side you need an exact number to cross the rope bridge and win the game. All three of your pieces must have crossed before you can claim victory.

I was getting bad spins and PLCary easily caught up with me. It was a battle across the rope bridge but in the end I lucked out and managed to get all of my pieces across first.

Which in the spirit of Temple of Doom meant I of course paused to cut the rope bridge.


Generally speaking board games based on 1980’s franchises were something of a crapshoot. I can say though that the Temple of Doom game was exceptionally fun. If you can get your hands on it – it is most worth adding to your collection.

Did You Know There Was a “Wayne’s World” Board Game?

Did you know said Wayne’s World game had a videocassette that was used for game play?

But First…

I never realized this, but the 1990s board game market was as crazy with videocassette-based games as the 1980s were. It seems there was a time before Scene It that we relied on the recordings of celebrities to guide us around a game board. And not only did we have that reliance, there were also many different VHS- guided games. Whether it was a haunted house mystery, a game of Clue, being able to get to a party on time, Star Wars, or Star Trek, there were so many different VHS board games to choose from. I even had a Chutes and Ladders VHS board game in the 1980s.

This is the only known video to exist on You Tube.

Uploaded by KidJuggalo

One minute and thirty-seven seconds, with torture by ice cream?! Why doesn’t anyone have the whole video posted?!

Wayne’s World, Rod Serling, and Tie-In Merchandise…

So this week, one of my all-time favorite films turned twenty-five, joining a list of movies I like having anniversaries that cover nearly my entire lifespan in the last few years. Last year, I saw Pretty in Pink and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off for their 30th anniversary showings, so when I found out that Wayne’s World was having a 25th “Birthday” screening, you best believe I threw down money to see it. Let me just say that while the “reunion” video after the movie was a tad disappointing, seeing the movie as I originally saw it in 1992 (in a movie theater) was not.

I sang along.

In my years of geeking out over nostalgia, I’ve come to find out that the movie itself had quite a bit of merchandise attached to it – the obligatory shirts, hats, soundtrack, as well as video games, a board game…

A board game.

I kid you not.

I have to admit, the idea of this game’s existence actually excited me at 34 years old the way it would have at nine years old, if I knew it existed back then. Which I didn’t.

And then I saw the accompanying video and was wiser.

Evidence #1 That I Shouldn’t Have Been Excited: This declaration.

The game, released by Mattel in 1992 as an obvious tie-in to the movie, with an end goal of getting to Party Central. And if you can get past the awkward acting and obvious fact that Mike Myers and Dana Carvey may have shot this at separate times (or possibly in separate places?), then this video will be entertaining for you. Oh, and Rod Serling makes a cameo. It’s not really Rod Serling, just someone who Mattel thought Rod Serling would sound like. Which is an obvious insult to Rod Serling.

Seriously, peeps. Someone tried to tie The Twilight Zone to Wayne’s World, and felt this was a great idea for a board game!

I’d really hate to explain the actual details of the video, because it wouldn’t do justice to what actually unfolds once you hit play.

So do it. Hit play. Watch the um…I’d normally say “magic,” but I don’t think that’s the word for this. Oh, that’s right, “train wreck.”

Uploaded by LEE PETE

The video also advertises two other Wayne’s World games that involve 3-D, cards, and dice. And no videocassettes.

I heard the video games were pretty terrible (I’ve never played them, so I have no idea), but the board game (or at least, the video attached to it) may yet be worse.

Regardless of the game being or not being a “totally amazing, excellent discovery,” it still exists, and that still doesn’t make it right.

This one was truly a product of marketing taking things up a notch, and nothing more.

Uploaded by Jacob Stork

 

Indeed, that is just really sad.

Stick with the movies, folks. They hold up better.

Allison is a long-time (twenty-five years and counting!) fan of Wayne’s World, beginning with the movie in 1992, later moving on to its origins with the Saturday Night Live sketches when she first saw reruns in mid-1996. She doesn’t have any kind of collectibles for the movie, but she does have both films on VHS (and the original on DVD), and both soundtracks on cassette tape. If you like what you’ve seen here, you can find even more fun over at Allison’s blog. She’d also love if you followed her blog’s Facebook page. She is @AllisonGeeksOut on Twitter, and she lives up to that handle in every way possible.

Pssst…she also wrote a Wayne’s World tribute over at her own blog. 

Alien - Board Game

Did You Play 1979’s Alien Board Game?

When it comes to merchandise for 1979’s masterpiece Alien. I feel the epitome of surprise comes from the fact that Kenner released an action figure. While Star Wars showed that kids loved science fiction toys – Alien was a horror film set in space. To say nothing that it was rated R, so it was kind of crazy that Kenner made an 18-inch figure in the first place.

[Via] Hitmon Tom

That is kind of a well known product. I certainly recall a bit of outrage from parent groups. As well as Siskel and Ebert showing off the figure – they too were dismayed and a little upset that Kenner made them. Of course now days those figures are highly sought after and demand a pretty penny from collectors.

As I’ve already said – I knew about the 18-inch action figure. What I didn’t know was just how far Kenner went with the marketing of the film. Releasing an Alien board game designed for children ages 7 and up?!
Alien - Board Game Objective

Players pick their favorite color, collecting three astronauts and one Xenomorph matching their color.

The Player of course is trying to lead their astronauts to the Nostromo’s escape shuttle – the Narcissus. Which is located in the center of the game board.

Fun fact. In the late great Dan O’Bannon’s original screenplay, the shuttle went by an entirely different name. It was simply called the Snark 2. The shuttle being christened Narcissus was thanks to the rewrite by David Giler and Walter Hill. Make sure to check out the really nicely painted images – scenes from Ridley Scott’s masterpiece.

Naturally a Player attempts to guide their Alien towards the opposing Player’s astronauts. Hunting them down one by one – obviously a Xenomorph can’t harm an astronaut of the same color. Thankfully there are some safe spots located on the board where one can hide from the intergalactic menace. Bear in mind the opposing Players are attempting the very same action.

Now that you’ve seen a bit of the Alien board game – why not check out this review by Think Bolt?


In addition you will get a close-up view of some of the fantastic artwork on the game board. Moreover I should add this looks in fact to be a pristine version of the game!

Mad Magazine

1979 Mad Magazine Board Game Commercial

Mad Magazine is pretty much a cultural icon in publishing. From it’s first issue in 1952 until today, Mad Magazine still stands as a wonderful satirical publication. Whether the subject matter be popular movies, sports, and public figures of course nothing is too sacred. Naturally everything is fair game. It should probably come as no surprise though the first issue I picked up was the Star Wars one.
star-wars-mad-magazine

As a matter of fact, the popularity of Mad Magazine had reached over two million subscribers by 1974. So in hindsight it shouldn’t have come as a surprise that Parker Brothers in 1979 decided to produce a board game. With this in mind you must expect some different win conditions. Furthermore the rules stated that not only did you have to roll the dice with your left hand. But also pass the turns counter-clockwise and the ultimate goal was to rid yourself of all your money. It featured as well a board chock full of the late, great Jack Davis’ artwork.

[Via] Mr. Classic Ads 1970

Try to imagine a group of children sitting down to win this game. To say nothing of having to suddenly switch chairs during the game play. Which could have disastrous consequences for you if were almost out of money!
Mad Magazine

In that commercial for the Mad Magazine board game did you notice a future celebrity?


You will have to look closely past the mustache and glasses but the Father is played by Richard Kind.
mad-magazine-game-richard-kind

Perhaps his name doesn’t ring a bell. Although it most certainly should as he has 198 acting credits. Here is the actor discussing his first summer job.

The White House

Let’s Play The 1979 Black Hole: Space Alert Board Game!

About a week ago, one of my good friends and co-workers at the Arkadia Retrocade sent me some images of a rather retro board game purchase thanks to eBay. As you can see from the image above it was 1979’s The Black Hole: Space Alert game which was produced by Whitman for the Walt Disney company. I did in fact own this back in my youth and had some very fond memories of playing it with my Father so I was totally looking forward to playing the game once again.

It came in awfully quick and last Wednesday when everything started getting quiet at the arcade a group of us decided to crack it open and geek out with some vintage 1979 board game action. Was it everything I remembered? Yes. It was an absolute blast!
Arkadia Retrocade - Vic Sage - The Black Hole
To my left is Luca, then Andrew with his back to the camera, and then the owner of the game, Rhi…you can only see her hand in this image. That will teach her to lean forward next time, right?

I chose the character of V.I.N.CENT…naturally…and Luca chose Dr. Kate McCrae, Andrew picked Lt. Charlie Pizer and Rhi went with Captain Dan Holland. Sadly in the game you can’t play the characters of Dr. Alex Durant (Anthony Perkins) or Harry Booth (Ernest Borgnine). I do remember that back in my youth when I had this game myself I was upset that there weren’t cardboard images of the characters.
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Player Pieces
The game board is quite large which I guess is why it’s made out of paper. For what it is worth Rhi really scored on this purchase, besides just a small amount of water damage the game is absolutely pristine.
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Board
Starting on the Palomino, the Players receive a hand of four cards and take one from the draw pile in attempt to match the symbol on the board or color so they can move forward one space.
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Palomino
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Cards
There are cards featuring Maximillian and the Android soldiers of the villainous Dr. Hans Reinhardt and these will let you take some well placed short cuts…assuming you can pull those cards.
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Paths
Early in the game it looked like V.I.N.CENT and Pizer were going to be the first ones to reach the Space Probe and escape the doomed Cygnus but an incredible amount of bad pulls from the card deck got me stuck on the board for like 6 complete turns.
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Maximillian
The Black Hole - Space Alert - Probe
Before we knew what hit us, Kate using some amazing strategy took the lead – Luca did a great job of thinking ahead, making sure she had the cards she would need to zip across the board. Which brings up a good point about not just this game but I think a lot of the board games that were aimed at younger players back in the day…you needed some strategy as well as a bit of luck. So Holland, Pizer, and V.I.N.CENT watched as Kate boarded the Space Probe and left us to be consumed by the ravenous Black Hole…just kidding…we all know Kate wouldn’t do that, she was just the first one to the probe.

This game was still incredibly fun to play 37 years after it was first released but one of the things that I really was impressed with was the actual card holder with The Black Hole logo imprinted on the plastic. Very late ’70s and early ’80s. It might be a small thing but for some reason it really made me happy to see that.
The Black Hole - Card Holder - Space Alert