1988 Oscars

What Won For The Best Original Song At The 1988 Oscars?

The Academy Awards have always been rather important to me. Even as a kid I would frequently be able to convince my Family that they should let me watch them. The 1988 Oscars were no exception. It did mark though the first time I had actually seen all of the nominated movies in the category for Best Original Song.

Which is why I vividly recall seeing the likes of Dudley Moore and Liza Minnelli presenting the award. My Father and I were always huge fans of Dudley Moore in fact. Thanks to catching 1981’s Arthur at the 62 Drive-In of my youth.
1988 Oscars

Of course it was equally important to myself that for this particular category in the 1988 Oscars. I happened to like all of the songs that were nominated. First up you had the moving song from Cry Freedom by George Fenton and Jonas Gwangwa.

Parmenides320

After that the second nomination was I’ve Had the Time of my Life from Dirty Dancing. Music by Franke Previtte, John Denicola, and Donald Markowitz. This by the way was the song that my Grandmother felt should take the award at the 1988 Oscars!
1988 Oscars - Dirty Dancing

[Via] BillMJennWVEVO

Occasionally the Academy Awards picks something you wouldn’t have expected. Case in point Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now from Mannequin! The song was by Albert Hammond and Diane Warren, however it was Jefferson Starship that belted out the tune.

[Via] StarshipVEVO

Yet another song that the Academy picked for the 1988 Oscars that will get your feet moving, was Beverley Hills Cop II’s Shakedown by Harold Faltermeyer and Keith Forsey. The lyrics had a little help from Bob Seger who in fact sang the song for the film.

[Via] mugabesunny

Finally we have the song Storybook Love from The Princess Bride. Music and lyrics by Willy Deville. This is the song that I was certain was going to win the award – I just knew it.

[Via] Mark Knopfler

Now that you know who was nominated for the 1988 Oscars for Best Original Song. Let’s find out who the award goes to!

Sing

Be My Guest, And Watch the Amazing Jerry Orbach Sing!

Be Our Guest is stuck in your head now, isn’t it?

Earworms, Disney Style

When I was nine years old, I loved watching Disney movies. One of those movies that I’ve seen as many times as most five-year-olds have seen Frozen is Beauty and the Beast. Combine those frequent viewings with ownership of the soundtrack on a cassette tape (which got frequent rotation in my Walkman), and yeah, I knew the songs. Kids now have Frozen (specifically, “Let it Go”); I had everything from Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, and the song that is the subject of today’s earworm.

Being that it is Academy Awards weekend, I’d be remiss if I didn’t fish a clip out of my archives that fit the occasion perfectly. And since many of my archives are from the 1990s, I just happened to have something perfect and, well, 90s.

Before There was Lenny, There Was Lumiere!

Many younger 80s kids (myself included) probably remember Jerry Orbach from his years as Detective Lenny Briscoe on Law and Order, a role he played from 1993 until leaving the show in 2004. When he passed away that same year, a void was left behind, and I had a hard time watching the show and not missing his cracks of wise. But before I saw him on Law and Order, I knew Jerry Orbach’s amazing singing voice as Lumiere the Candelabra in the 1991 film Beauty and the Beast. And while I don’t actively watch Disney movies (aside from the Marvel Cinematic Universe), I do know a good Disney movie when I see one. More specifically, I know a good performance of a Disney movie song when I see one.

Sing

When I was working on the subject of my most recent Throwback Thursday article, there were a few snippets of the 64th Academy Awards that I left mixed in with the commercials, and for good reason. Witness the Disney movie emcee with the most, Jerry Orbach, as he asks you, the audience to be his guest.

Be my guest and click play to witness him sing and dance, because after all this is France!

Uploaded by…yours truly! :-)

Sheer amazement, isn’t it?!

So whether you watch the awards for the dresses, movies you like that got nominated, or because you happen to like award shows, enjoy this year’s Academy Awards. And if not, well…have a great weekend!

 

A Christmas Carol

Toon In: Enjoy 1971’s A Christmas Carol!

I mentioned in the last of the Retro Radio Memories Podcasts – I love A Christmas Carol. Charles Dickens 1843 novella really gets to me. I’ve as a matter of fact have pretty much loved all adaptations of the classic tale. Just a few of my favorites include 1951’s Scrooge, 1983’s Mickey’s Christmas Carol, 1984’s overlooked made for TV version featuring George C. Scott and of course 1970’s version of Scrooge!

[Via] Plains Video

It most certainly has a bit to do with the supernatural elements…I mean I AM a monster kid. But more than that is the message that a person can be saved from a destructive path, they can better themselves. The act of redemption of course is what keeps me coming back to A Christmas Carol again and again.

Now having said all of that. There appears to be a version of the story that I’ve not seen before. An 1971 animated special that aired on ABC on December 21. But proved so popular that it was later given a theatrical release. Then secured an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 1972!

Which by the way the Academy changed the rules right after that win – so a made for TV short film cannot be eligible. A bit of humbug with that, right?

While the stunning animation style was based on the illustrations provided by John Leech and Milo Winter. Who in fact provided the artwork for the 1930’s version of Dickens’ novella. The short film also had legendary Chuck Jones as a producer with direction by Richard Williams.

Another key point to remember about this adaptation of A Christmas Carol is the sometimes frightening images. Whether it be the likes of Jacob Marley – shocking Ebenezer to keep him silent.
A Christmas Carol

Or the Ghost of Christmas Present’s charges Ignorance and Want. Memorable and visually striking to say the least.

Another feature in the short film’s cap is the vocal talent they secured. For example you have Michael Redgrave as the narrator, Michael Hordren as Jacob Marley, Joan Sims as Mrs. Cratchit, and Alastair Sim as Ebenezer Scrooge. Yes, it is true that Sim reprises the role he played in 1951’s film adaption!

So sit back and Toon In for 1971’s A Christmas Carol – and from all of us at The Retroist have a Happy Holiday!

Just Jeff 53

A Man For All Seasons Theatrical Poster (1966)


A big thanks to Retroist Regular, Atari Adventure Square, for being so kind as to send me this link to Paste Magazine.Com’s 100 Best Movie Posters.

Of the many fantastic posters showcased on that site, and you’ll be seeing some of them here in the future, I decided to pick this one as tonight is the 84th Annual Academy Awards and A Man For All Seasons took home the Oscar for best picture (The 39th recipient to do so) and Best Actor for the legendarily talented Paul Scofield among others.

[Via] Yarco TV’s YouTube Channel

Besides Paul Scofield it boasts Orson Welles, Leo McKern, Nigel Davenport, Susannah York, Wendy Hiller, Robert Shaw, and a young John Hurt in it’s cast. If you’ve not had the pleasure of viewing this classic film I would recommend you pick it up and give it a watch.

Many thanks as always to the ever impressive IMP Awards for the original theatrical poster you see up top.

Steven Spielberg in Jaws

Watch the 1976 Oscar Nominations along with Steven Spielberg!

With the 84th Annual Academy Awards on ABC this evening at 7e/4p it seemed such a great time for this video of Steven Spielberg watching the 1976 Oscar nominations to make it’s way to YouTube! From this video, Steven Spielberg jokingly suggests that Jaws will sweep all of the Oscar nominations…it didn’t quite work out that way.

Thanks to The Daily What. for sharing this from Media Burn Archive’s YouTube channel!.