ReBoot: The Guardian Code - Title

Are You Ready For ReBoot: The Guardian Code?

ReBoot blew me away when it debuted on ABC one Saturday morning in 1994. With my love of all things video games and computer related, Mainframe Entertainment, Alliance Communications and BLT Productions certainly captured my attention. In that year I was working a full time job but I made sure I was up and watching ReBoot every week. Which is why of course the news of a…reboot… took me by surprise. As well as the fact that ReBoot: The Guardian Code is totally going live on Netflix on March 30th!
ReBoot: The Guardian Code - Mainframe

When I think about the original series, I generally recall the humor and winks to popular culture the show managed to include in almost every episode. Whether that be throwbacks to the popular video games of the day. Or even film franchises such as the James Bond series, including a fantastic song intro from the third episode of Season three. Firewall!

[Via] Reboot HD

Granted the animation might seem a little dated by today’s standards. I can assure you though it was pretty amazing stuff back in ’94. Of course it was the characters and story line that made so many fans. I think it is safe to say that the show borrowed a few elements from the likes of 1982’s TRON. A lone Guardian named Bob, whose mission was to protect the inhabitants of a city called Mainframe. Not just from the wicked deeds of Megabyte and his Sister, Hexadecimal. But from those of us playing video games, the Users.

[Via] Shout! Factory

Now then, we have a new series. Entitled Reboot: The Guardian Code. Immediately upon watching it I paused the official trailer. Some things have certainly changed in this updated version…like it has live action elements!
ReBoot: The Guardian Code - Bad guy

That took me quite but surprise. Granted this show is being aimed at an audience younger than myself. I will admit I am okay with this as it also appears to possibly have ties to the original series. At the very least it looks like Megabyte has been resurrected by the series’ mysterious villain.
ReBoot: The Guardian Code - Megabyte

Much like the first series did with borrowing elements of TRON it seems that ReBoot: The Guardian Code will do the same. Although in this case it is a mix of TRON: Legacy, Pacific Rim and even Ready Player One.
ReBoot: The Guardian Code - Guardians

ReBoot: The Guardian Code - Firewall

Which seems quite appropriate, friends. As Ready Player One of course hits theaters on March 30th. Which I am sure that Netflix is very well aware of. Will it be any good? I have no idea but I am certainly going to at least give it a chance. Things always change and I for one won’t begrudge a new generation their own joy of being introduced to ReBoot.

I’ve talked a bit about the first series, so without further ado, check out the trailer for ReBoot: The Guardian Code!

[Via] ReBoot The Guardian Code

Brady Kids

The Lone Ranger Meets The Brady Kids


I have been a fan of the Lone Ranger for as long as I can remember. I used to watch re-runs of the TV show as a kid. I enjoyed watching Clayton Moore as the Lone Ranger and Jay Silverheels as Tonto. I’ve seen some of the Lone Ranger movies, and listened to many of the old radio shows.

Thrill to the audio adventures of The Lone Ranger in The Town With No Guns

One of the coolest things about the radio show is that occasionally the Lone Ranger and Tonto would team-up with famous figures from the days of the wild west. These team-ups featured everyone from Annie Oakley to Teddy Roosevelt.

Recently, I saw an ad on Twitter that had the Lone Ranger team-up with the characters from another TV show that I used to watch as a kid – The Brady Bunch.
Lone Ranger

This has to be one of the most unique Lone Ranger team-ups where the Lone Ranger and Tonto meet the Brady Bunch kids in this episode of The Brady Kids entitled Long Gone Silver.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kzx36ce2lgU
[Via] Brady the Kids

Please take a look at Between the Pages to see amazing pop culture cakes and a neat Johnny Depp version of a Tonto Cake.

Moonbase 3

Lunar lunacy on Moonbase 3

How excited would you be to find out that the minds behind Doctor Who were being given a second show to run, an original science fiction epic of their own design, with money coming not just from the BBC, but a major American studio, to be shown on a U.S. broadcast network?
Moonbase 3

If you were asked this in 2017, you’d probably be pretty excited. If, on the other hand, you were asked in 1973, you might also be excited, unaware that the result would be a short-lived show called Moonbase 3.

[Via] Collin Dubberley

Devised by Barry Letts and Terrance Dicks, who were, respectively, the producer and script editor of Jon Pertwee-era early ’70s Doctor Who, Moonbase 3 chronicles the dramatic goings-on at a British-run moon base, where research, politics, and the middle ground between the two – funding – are always points of contention. The pent-up confines of the base make it a pressure cooker between conflicting personalities; in this environment, personality quirks can become more pronounced, or even dangerous to others.
Moonbase 3

The BBC got 20th Century Fox to pitch in on the making of Moonbase 3, so its model work is fairly impressive – not just 1973 impressive, but nicely done and detailed. (Compare to a contemporary episode of Doctor Who, Frontier In Space, which featured a spacecraft whose spherical nose was literally a painted light bulb. Please don’t drop the model.) There was no obligation from the BBC to connect Moonbase 3 to Doctor Who, so it isn’t a spinoff; it actually aired in a late night slot on ABC in the States.

In fact, it’s that little known American broadcast that explains why we have the show at all now; as is often sadly the case, British-made shows shot on videotape tended to be shown once or twice, and then the tapes would be wiped and reused, as videotape was an expensive luxury in the 1970s. As far as anyone knew, until PAL-to-NTSC converted broadcast videotapes turned up in the vaults in America, Moonbase 3 was lost for good. (In fact, the show’s co-creator, Terrance Dicks, has offered the opinion that this might’ve been just as well, but when one considers the sadly incomplete state of such series as Doomwatch, Doctor Who, Ace Of Wands and Out Of The Unknown, the recovery of the entirety of Moonbase 3 has to count as a good thing.) Converted back to PAL, Moonbase 3 has since been released on DVD in the UK. (It’s so completely unknown in America that no Region 1 release has ever been scheduled; for whatever it’s worth, the show also exists in YouTubed form.)

[Via] Whovian69uk’s channel

What does Moonbase 3 have going for it? An always-interesting cast, ever-shifting alliances and agitations between characters, and some decent sets and special effects for an early ’70s BBC series. The acting style is, to be charitable, early ’70s UK TV – stagey and a bit shouty – but Moonbase 3 boasts some familiar guest stars if you’re a fan of British TV. The highlight of the six episodes is Castor & Pollux, an episode chronicling a mishap during an international space mission involving one of Moonbase 3’s crew – it’s a gripping and plausible story (from a show that predated the American/Soviet Apollo Soyuz Test Project mission by two years) with some dizzying effects work.

On the downside, Moonbase 3 is thick with human intrigue and interpersonal conflict, and perhaps a bit short on the awe and wonder of space. The heavy, oppressive atmosphere of the show isn’t a bundle of laughs, and depending on your frame of mind may not even be entertaining. A few keen observers of British TV have noted that there’s more than a slight similarity between Moonbase 3 and the moody first season of Space: 1999, which arrived two years later on rival network ITV.

Moonbase 3 is an acquired taste, and it’s easy to see why it ran six episodes and then simply didn’t get picked up. The spacey sets built for the show were easy enough to recycle – they turned up as a faux spaceship in the season of Doctor Who that came after Moonbase 3’s short run – and Barry Letts and Terrance Dicks elected to concentrate their energy on the relatively light-hearted travels of the TARDIS. Moonbase 3 survives as a bit of a TV cul-de-sac, a sci-fi curio that may be more effective as a mood piece than as a story.

Ethel Merman

In 1979 Ethel Merman Performed Disco On Kids Are People Too?

While this post is certainly about Ethel Merman and her foray into the disco craze. It was in fact brought about thanks to finding this ad in a 1979 TV Guide. For the 1972 to 1982 Saturday Morning variety show, Kids Are People Too.

[Via] Howie Zeidman
Ethel Merman

Sadly I’ve not been lucky enough to find any of that Christopher Reeve segment online. Although at the very least we do have the Ethel Merman disco rendition of Alexander’s Ragtime Band! I am afraid however that you will have to follow the link here to see that particular TV broadcast. Having said that I am happy to say that you can see her perform the same number on this segment of Johnny Carson.

[Via] Alan Eichler

Read: Speaking of Christopher Reeve, Check Out This 1978 Behind The Scenes Photo From Superman!

I will admit that we use the term legendary a little too freely these days. However in regards to Ethel Merman there is no other way to describe the woman. Born Ethel Agnes Zimmerman in 1908 – of course she swore it was 1912. Ethel Merman ended up altering her name because of fears it wouldn’t fit on a marquee very easily. Merman found success thanks to her comedic style, bold and strong character, as well as her iconic voice.

[Via] Congobeat

Ethel Merman started making a name for herself after performing as a singer for Jimmy Durante. In fact the two would form a lifelong bond of friendship from this working experience.

Read: You Might Recall The Jimmy Durante Character From Crispy Critters Cereal

Soon she became a Broadway star after appearing in the Gershwin musical Girl Crazy in 1930. A role that audiences and critics took notice of – not to mention running for 272 performances. Although she would appear in numerous movies and TV shows throughout her life, it was most certainly Broadway where she reigned supreme.

Ethel Merman - Disco Album
In 1979, at the ripe old age of seventy-one, Ethel was naturally still going strong. Which is when of course she decided to release The Ethel Merman Disco Album. Featuring seven songs that she was well known for:

  • There’s No Business Like Show Business
  • Everything’s Coming Up Roses
  • I Get a Kick Out of You
  • Something for the Boys
  • Some People
  • Alexander’s Ragtime Band
  • I Got Rhythm

It has been said that Ethel literally recorded all seven songs for the album – in one take each. The disco arraingement was added in afterwards, which might have resulted in the rather negative reviews. I can’t speak to any of that as perhaps I just love Ethel Merman too much to care?

[Via] Thierry Alexandre