“Found Footage” Gameplay – “Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour”

Of course, this is if you consider gameplay footage you made in 2007 “found footage.”

2007: The Year of the “Yellow DVD”

2007 was two years before I started watching James Rolfe’s “Angry Video Game Nerd,” videos, and at least four years before I started watching any kind of gameplay-related videos. So when I did my own unintentional gameplay video in 2007, it was only because I was recording something for the sake of recording something.

Because, why not?

Last year, I was transferring recorded DVDs I made in the mid-2000s to my Passport drive, and created a file for one of my DVDs, “Yellow DVD.” I didn’t think anything of what I recorded on the DVD until I was looking for a specific commercial for one of my blog posts, and spotted a gameplay video I’d made.

Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour

Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour is the sequel to the 1999 Nintendo 64 game Mario Golf. Published by Nintendo (with development by Camelot Software Planning), Toadstool Tour was released on July 28, 2003, with a Player’s Choice label version released in 2004.

Toadstool Tour has sixteen playable characters, tournaments to obtain new features, trainings, and variations on the “traditional” golf format. There are seven different courses with varying degrees of difficulty featuring various elements common to all Super Mario games. The controls are smooth for even the casual gamer (read: they’re easy for me to master).

The only issue I’ve ever found with control is the short putt (which was a common issue among reviewers). The game was well-received, and as of December 2007, sold 1.03 million units in North America. The game also was the last Mario golf-related game to release to a home console (the most recent Mario Golf game, World Tour, was released for the Nintendo 3DS in 2014).

This was a frequent rental at the video store I worked at (I started there in 2003). I got this game as a birthday present in 2006, and it is one of my favorites to this day. And since my Nintendo Wii works again (not sure how that happened, but it reads discs again!), I’m definitely going to be swinging a club sometime soon!

Of course, that brings me to the real reason you’re here.

Do you like gameplay videos? Because I’ve got gameplay for you!

Gloriously Found Footage – Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour

As I said, I found this eighteen-minute video I randomly recorded to a DVD-R in 2007. I can’t give you any reason for why I recorded this, but after working on a massive commercial archive for the last ten years, I see the appeal of finding this video.

I didn’t record any commentary for this, since it’s golf, and well, there isn’t much to say, I’m just going to let you enjoy the video. I’m aware this game isn’t overly retro, Mario and all of his cohorts are classics.

Being a classic character in a slightly more modern time qualifies as retro by association, right?

I guess?

Enough yammering, click play below and watch the glory of luscious green golf courses and video game characters come together for something awesome!

Upload via Allison Venezio / Allison’s Written Words

Gameplay – “Captain America and The Avengers”

That’s right – a gameplay video!

After over a year of telling myself “I’ll make another gameplay video,” I finally did.

Avengers…Assemble!

Last year, right before seeing Captain America: Civil War, I combed through the emulator archives for an Avengers/Captain America video game. My only requirement was that it came out while I was growing up. That’s it – nothing else.

What I found was Captain America and the Avengers.

Captain America and the Avengers was released by Data East in 1991 as  an arcade side-scrolling/beat ’em up game. In the arcade port, players choose from four playable characters:

This part surprised me. When I think Avengers, I think Iron Man, Captain America, Hulk, Thor, Hawkeye, and Black Widow. Well, this is almost accurate. Vision is a playable character. And he doesn’t look like the Vision I know. I see Vision, I think Paul Bettany’s depiction, not a man-size solid white chocolate being.

Leaving out Thor was a bit disappointing for me, but Hawkeye and Cap more than make up for it.

And so do these descriptions! Vision the Adventurer!

Gameplay

The game has one player, two player, and training modes.

Training mode is designated for two players, but when you’re flying solo, you improvise. And yes, I reenacted Civil War.

Don’t feel bad for Tony Stark here. But by all means, feel bad for him here!

Reception (Both Mine and the Critics)

The original arcade cabinet ranks 5th in Watch Mojo’s Top 10 Marvel Video Games, with the Genesis version receiving favorable reviews. This is the Super Nintendo port. I wouldn’t complain that it is difficult, but the controls aren’t the greatest either. I’ve played many beat ’em ups, but this one felt overwhelming when you are playing alone and ganged up on by. If you are going to play it, play it with someone, as it is intended to be a co-op.

As you watch my gameplay video, you’ll notice I didn’t get very far. Not because I lack patience, but this video would have been five hours of me hitting “continue.” And the commentary would have devolved into me not being so kind toward the game. And really, I couldn’t allow that. I like this game! Quite possibly my only complaint – the use of the same voice for all four characters, and the obnoxious “NO!!!!” as the characters take hits from enemies. Good lord, it was obnoxious to hear it every five seconds!

That, and no Thor. But Hawkeye was there.

Goofy original outfit and all.

Go on and click play below, and if you don’t mind off-the-cuff commentary and watching me inevitably die constantly, then you’ve made the right choice. Let me know what you think – I’d love to do more gameplay videos!

Enjoy!

Captain America and The Avengers

Upload via Allison Venezio / Allison’s Written Words

Bomb Jack - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Bomb Jack (1984)

Bomb Jack - Marquee
Friends, how many of you recall Bomb Jack? It was an arcade title that was developed as well as manufactured by Tehkan in 1984. It is also as a matter of fact, the subject of this week’s Retro Arcade Art by Christopher Tupa.

Bomb Jack - Flyer

Flyer courtesy of the Arcade Flyer Archive.

While Tehkan might not sound familiar. I am certainly positive you know them by their current company name. Which is Tecmo! Bomb Jack proved popular enough by the way that it received three sequels. Bomb Jack Twin was another arcade game with Mighty Bomb Jack and Bomb Jack II for home consoles and computers.
Bomb Jack - Mighty Bomb Jack - NES

Just before I jump into the mechanics of Bomb Jack I will remind you of CTupa’s new art project. The artist will be sharing one new illustration a week for the foreseeable future. Furthermore they are all based off the Golden Age of video games.

As an added bonus you can pick up each of the Retro Arcade Art offerings. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s official site to contact him as well as check out more artwork and even listen to his podcasts!

Bomb Jack tasks players with controlling Jack. Obviously. A superhero who must travel throughout time and pick up the red bombs scattered across the stages. While avoiding contact with the numerous enemies that populate the level. Fortunately for our hero he can jump super high and even float.

There is a bonus when players pick up the bombs after the fuse has been lit. Doing so will cause the meter at the top of the screen to expand. Once it is totally full it will release a circular and bouncing letter P. If Jack nabs that he becomes invincible as well as the enemies transforming into bonus coins to be picked up.
Bomb Jack - Power Up

In addition the player can pick up other bonuses. Such as the letter B, which will increase your score multiplier by 5. On the other hand there is also E that gives Players and extra Bomb Jack. Last but not least we have S which is the rarer bonus and it will give you an entirely free game.

Now why not take a few minutes and check out the game play for Bomb Jack

[Via] Classic Game Videos

Make sure to enjoy the earlier entry for the Retro Arcade Art By CTupa!


Retro Arcade Art 1 (Beezer)

Beezer - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Beezer (1982)

Friends, have you ever heard of Beezer? It was an arcade game produced and manufactured by Tong Electronic Inc. although it was distributed by Intrepid Marketing. I will admit that until Christopher Tupa contacted me the other day about his Retro Arcade Art. I certainly had not heard of Beezer before either!
Beezer - Marquee

Now I will jump into what the game play for Beezer is like in just a second. Of course first I need to talk about Tupa’s new art project. I am sure many of you longtime fans of the Retroist are quite familiar with CTupa’s fantastic artwork. He has not only graciously shared his work on the site in the past but even provided illustrations for various Retroist podcasts. Case in point the second of the famed Halloween Specials!


For Retro Arcade Art by CTupa, the artist will be sharing one new illustration a week for the foreseeable future. Furthermore they are all based off the Golden Age of video games. Indeed, a time when a single quarter was the key to protecting the universe or simply becoming a busy bee.

While some of the games that CTupa has chosen in the coming weeks are more mainstream, he made sure to pick unknown titles too. Like Beezer of course. Which as a matter of fact was a conversion kit. Meaning when arcade operators back in the day noticed a machine not being played as much, instead of shelling out the coin to get a brand new arcade cabinet. They could pick up Beezer. With a quick swap of a PC board, the control panel which included a trakball. The applying of cabinet decals and finally replacing the marquee and bezel, instead of a Galaxian you would have a Beezer!
Beezer - Conversion Kit

The goal of Beezer is to maneuver through a honeycomb, avoiding contact with the other bees. Our hero must attempt to trap said bees by turning three-sided walls within the honeycomb. Creating a six-sided trap, which will dispatch an enemy caught in it.
Beezer - Trap

However the traps can work on Beezer as well, which will result in the loss of a life. This can happen when the Queen appears in the honeycomb. She not only can move the three-sided walls herself but lays eggs. These eggs will hatch and naturally become more enemy bees to contend with.
Beezer - Queen Egg

Thankfully for Beezer if he eats those eggs first, he in fact becomes super-powered. Which as a result allows him to eat the enemy bees instead of trying to trap them! In addition our hero can move through the hive himself by way of “caves”.

Now why not take a few minutes and check out the game play for Beezer?

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming

Do you love Tupa’s Beezer artwork? Know the perfect arcade fan that needs it? Then you are totally in luck as the artist is selling each of the Retro Art Arcade offerings. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s official site to contact him as well as check out more artwork and even listen to his podcasts!

Death Race Video Game Controversy

Death Race Video Game Controversy

Long before Grand Theft Auto was freaking everyone out, we had the Death Race Video Game Controversy. Death Race is till a controversial arcade game. It was released by Exidy in the United States in 1976 and they only made about 500 of these cabinets. This makes this infamous game a difficult one to find. I was lucky enough to be able to play it at the Musée Mécanique in San Francisco.

Death Race was controversial because it appeared to promote vehicular violence. Even though Exidy took great pains to describe the human stick figures you are running over a “gremlins”, people were not buying it. The media lashed out. It did not help that the game’s working title was Pedestrian and appeared to be inspired by the 1975 cult film Death Race 2000.

Here is an example of the media reaction at the time in the form of a newspaper article. It hangs right next to the machine at the Musée Mécanique.

death race video game article

Controversial, maybe. But did it contribute to an increase in violence? No. It also did not do so well for Exidy. This was probably partly due to the backlash.

As you might guess from the year of its release, the game does not have anything resembling modern video game violence. By today’s standards, it is quite tame. Here is some game-play footage. I hope it does not turn your stomach or worse, turn you into a homicidal maniac.

Death Race Game-play Video

I played a couple of games of Death Race. It handled pretty well and was kind of fun. You won’t find many of these games out in the wild, but if you are at one of their know locations, make sure you drop a few quarters into one. According to online sources you can find Death Race machines at Musée Mécanique in San Francisco, the Galloping Ghost Arcade in Illinois, and Fun Spot in New Hampshire.

If you do play, I would love to hear about your experience. At least share how well you did. According to the game, I am an Expert Drive. So try and beat that.

death race scoring