watch comet tv

Watch Comet TV without a TV

This weekend I sat down to watch Comet TV. It is an over the air station that usually comes in very crisply, but for some reason, my signal was terrible. I was going to turn on a movie when I remembered that you could watch Comet TV online on their website. This is great, but and I was about to play around with casting the browser via Chromecast, when I saw a link to new Comet TV apps.

Being a Roku user, I was very happy to see Comet making an effort to appear on that underrated platform. I grabbed my remote and searched for an installed the Comet TV Roku App. It took just a few seconds. Moments later I was streaming Comet TV and now had another option for watching this great channel.

Now, I normally get a decent signal, but I have lots of friends who do not have Comet TV in their area. This app and the one they also released for Apple TV will give them the ability to watch the same great programming I have been enjoying. So Comet fans rejoice. You now have at least 4 ways to enjoy this channel and I am sure more are on the horizon.

Read Are you watching Comet TV?

About Comet TV

If this is the first time you are hearing about Comet TV, I suggest you run over to their website or check your local listings. Comet TV is well-curated Science Fiction channel. Not only does it show great rare films and cult classics, but it runs quality shows like Stargate and Mystery Science Theater 3000. They are everything I want in a Sci-Fi TV broadcaster and everything I had hoped the old Sci-Fi Channel (now SyFy) would have been.

COMET

Want to know what is on Comet tonight? Check out their programming schedule. This morning I woke up to them broadcasting the Doctor Goldfoot films with Vincent Price. It made it very difficult for me to get off the couch and go to work.

Invisible Man

Visible Appreciation For The Invisible Man

Hollywood has taken many a swipe at retelling H.G. Wells’ tale of The Invisible Man. It’s just possible that none of them were as intentionally shagadelic as the 1975 NBC TV series of the same name.
Invisible Man

The Invisible Man starred David McCallum, who had just finished a two-season stint on the BBC World War II series Colditz, but was still best known to viewers the world over as The Man From UNCLE’s Ilya Kuryakin. McCallum was instantly recognizable, and still hot property on both sides of the Atlantic, and in this series he played scientist David Westin, who uses himself as a guinea pig in experiments to achieve invisibility. Westin’s wife, Kate, is refreshingly shown to be his partner in both lab and love, and his intellectual equal as a scientist; she’s played by Melinda Fee, who later became a household name on the soap opera scene. Craig Stevens, still best known for playing Peter Gunn, is their beleaguered boss, Walter Carlson.

But the effect is supposed to be temporary, and instead Westin is permanently invisible. And since the Cold War is still on, as soon as word leaks out from the Klae Corporation, the Westins’ employer, that invisibility has been achieved, it isn’t long before government agents want Westin and his secrets, and show few qualms about hurting anyone who stands in their way. The Invisible Man is emblematic of entertainment in the lingering shadows of both Watergate and the Cold War: even our guys can’t be trusted, never mind the Commies. To prevent the process from being repeated for the benefit of spies and assassins, Westin destroys the equipment that rendered him invisible, thereby cutting off any hope that he can just step back into the machine and become visible again.

In order to pay back for the equipment and to stay in a position where he can try to figure out how to become visible again, Dan Westin becomes “the Klae Resource”, a top secret asset for which the Klae Corporation commands top-dollar prices. From takedowns of drug rings to corrupt small-town judges, nothing is more than the Invisible Man can handle. Dan always has a handy stockpile of gloves and masks that just happen to look flawlessly like the hands and head of David McCallum.

To show Dan donning or ditching his “visible man” disguise involved a problematic process of shooting on video against a blue screen, with McCallum in at least a partial blue bodysuit that would “vanish”. In an attempt to avoid the jarring switch between film and video, that video footage would be played back on a monitor whose refresh rate matched the shutter speed of a film camera positioned directly in front of it. This effect was used sparingly, both because of the time involved and because, frankly, it didn’t look that great.

So what did The Invisible Man have going for it? The sheer chemistry going on between McCallum and Fee accounts for much of the appeal. In true 1970s style, the show plays up the one thing we’ve always suspected about the Invisible Man, in whatever setting the story is told: while Westin is invisible, he’s running around naked. Little secret is made of the fact that the Westins take every opportunity to…enjoy…Dan’s invisibility. They’re a great on-screen team – The Invisible Man has a lot of comedy moments and doesn’t take itself too seriously. The invisibility gag is put to use in situations other than earth-shaking secret agent scenarios, which also keeps things lively.

If you’re new to The Invisible Man, you’ll be happy to know that the pilot movie and all twelve episodes are available on DVD and, since the show was shot on film, Blu-Ray. Be warned that the Blu-Rays, while sharp, reframe the show in widescreen, cutting off the top and bottom of film footage that was always intended to be in a 4:3 aspect ratio. I wish the Blu-Ray producers of the world would get the hint that this is as much of a butchering of the original material as pan-and-scan VHS tapes were. (The DVD gives you the original 4:3 picture.)

So why did The Invisible Man last only 12 episodes? Invisibility gags, whether they’re of the time-consuming, video-to-film type or pulling stuff along on fishing line, aren’t cheap to do, and each episode has several of them. The show’s creators, Harve Bennett and Steven Bochco, were rising stars who had more than one iron in their respective fires – Bennett was already overseeing The Six Million Dollar Man, while Bochco was in the early stages of a career that would see him go on to be the showrunner and creator of the likes of Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, and Cop Rock. After The Invisible Man’s cancellation, Bennett retooled the concept and relaunched it just a few months later as the even-shorter-lived Gemini Man, trading McCallum’s British class in for Ben Murphy’s all-American aw-shucks, which only stayed on the prime time schedule for four weeks following a pilot movie. (Gemini Man may well be remembered best for giving us the MST3K episode “Riding With Death”.)

In the meantime, rewind to 1975 and enjoy once more the days when The Invisible Man – complete with a mention of H.G. Wells in the end credits – was keeping the prime time schedule groovy.

[Via] Visual Ent

Voltron 84

Netflix Unleashes Voltron 84 – 12 Handpicked Episodes!

Here is some exciting news that will certainly get your day started right. Netflix has just unleashed Voltron 84 on their streaming service. 12 classic handpicked episodes from some of those responsible for the hit Voltron: Legendary Defender by Dreamworks.
Voltron 84

Furthermore, each of these episodes is introduced by one of those creative forces. As well as explaining why the choice of that particular episode, why it stayed with them through the years. In addition to how Voltron 84 helped them usher the property to a brand new generation of fans, a mere 32 years later.

VOLTRON

Of course you might be interested in just what episodes have been picked for the Voltron 84 ‘special’:

  • Joaquim Dos Santos (Executive Producer)
    “The Stolen Lion”
  • Lauren Montgomery (Co-Executive Producer)
    “The Sleeping Princess”
  • Tim Hedrick (Story Editor)
    “Doom Boycotts the Space Olympics”
  • Mitch Iverson (Writer)
    “Space Explorers Captured”
  • Josh Keaton (voice of Shiro)
    “Escape to Another Planet“
  • Steve Ahn (Director)
    “The Missing Key”
  • Christine Bian (Design Supervisor)
    “The Right Arm of Voltron”
  • Kimberly Brooks (voice of Allura)
    “The Lion Has New Claws”
  • Benjamin Kaltenecker (Line Producer)
    “Secret of the White Lion”
  • Jeff Adams (Supervising Picture Editor)
    “The Witch Gets A Facelift”
  • Chris Palmer (Director)
    “Give me Your Princess”
  • Josh Hamilton (Story Editor)
    “The Treasure of Planet Tyrus”

I think that you fans of Voltron will agree that is a nice selction of episodes. In addition if you would like to read a bit more about why Voltron 84 came about – you can in fact read this interview over on io9.
Voltron 84

Now that you know of Voltron 84, watch the intro to the original series!

[Via] Skully the Hypno Skull

Enterprise

A Little Bit Of The Enterprise

A lot has changed over the years. My hairline, my waistline, the number of bills I have to pay. But not my deep and abiding love for Star Trek: The Next Generation. A unique occasion has arrived to compare what’s probably the very first piece of TNG merchandise I ever shelled out money for, to the most recent addition to my collection…which are nearly the same size.

Enterprise
On the left, we have the Enterprise 1701-D from the Eaglemoss Star Trek Starship Collection. Eaglemoss is a UK published specializing in collectible “partworks” – magazines with goodies. Those signing up as subscribers to the Starship Collection get two $20 models a month, each with magazines detailing the histories of each ship both on-screen and off. That’s an awesome idea…and way too rich for my blood. But I did avail myself of a recent sale on Eaglemoss’ site to pick up a couple of additions to my own Starfleet.

On the right, we have my very well-worn die-cast metal Enterprise 1701-D, released by Galoob in 1987 alongside the earliest episodes of TNG’s first season. Now, given that I was a teenager when both show and ship arrived, you’d think this ship would have occupied a place of honor on a shelf somewhere, but no – full disclosure: it has been flown around many a room, virtually every place I’ve ever lived, and has almost as many battle scars as my old die-cast Kenner Star Wars ships. It is much loved…and it’s 30 years old this year.

It’s easy to see that there are worlds of difference between the two – advances in paint application and manufacturing abound over a three-decade time period. The Eaglemoss Enterprise has much more precise detail, down to the hull-plating “aztecing” that many a modelmaker (or admirer) obsesses over. The clear bits that are supposed to be glowy? They’re clear and, if you hold the Enterprise up to a light source, glowy.

The Galoob Enterprise is nothing to sneeze at. Yes, there are visible screws, and much of the detail is part of the mold rather than part of the paint job. But the amount of detail that’s there is impressive and accurate. It’s also worth noting that a lot of the Enterprise’s legendary “aztecing” wasn’t present in the earliest days of the show: it couldn’t be seen until a new four-foot model was constructed for filming roughly halfway into TNG’s on-air lifespan. The bluish-gray of the 1987 Enterprise reflects what we saw on screen.
Enterprise 1701 D

Oh, and the Galoob Enterprise can separate its saucer section – the Eaglemoss Enterprise can’t do that, full-stop. (Which is okay – saucer separation happened three whole times in nearly 200 episodes, four if you count the save-our-skins maneuver in the movie Star Trek: Generations; spoiler: it didn’t save the ship on that occasion.)

Eaglemoss’ model is equipped with a display stand that seems, well, a little on the delicate side. The ship is also on the delicate side: the saucer and main body are a lightweight metal, but the engines with their transparent components are plastic. This Enterprise would probably suffer critical damage if dropped. It’s meant to spend its time flying on a display shelf. The Galoob Enterprise has no stand – you’re on your own there – but has obviously survived some rough flying. It’s a hefty die-cast metal with no plastic.

A Galoob Enterprise in good condition will probably set your Starfleet fleet-building budget back a few credits, especially if it’s still in the package. The Eaglemoss model will also do this, but you get a much more delicate (but also possibly more accurate) model out of the deal. If you plunk down money for the subscription, there’s also a lot more where it came from; Galoob’s toy license for TNG was short-lived, and its die-cast Enterprise flies alone.
Enterprise

The good news is, they’re both the same beautiful ship.

If you’re not flying it past the camera or just your face and making whooshing warp drive sounds, what’s a little Enterprise for?

Castle Rock

Castle Rock Series Promises A Stephen King Multiverse

The announcement of Hulu‘s Castle Rock series has made one thing rather clear. This is in fact a very good time to be a fan of Stephen King. In July we will have a film adaptation of The Dark Tower as well as It in September. It was just a few days ago that I shared the amazing piece of fan art inspired by that 1986 novel.

Read: Fan Transforms 1958 Stereo Unit Into Derry From Stephen King’s It

Castle Rock is an upcoming 10-episode series, furthermore it is an exclusive for Hulu. Produced by J.J. Abrams with show creators and writers, Sam Shaw & Dustin Thomason. Whom you might know from the criminally underappreciated Manhattan.

[Via] BD Horror and Trailer Clips

I’m not sure about you but I am totally digging the vibe of that teaser trailer. As to why this in fact looks to be a Stephen King Multiverse series, I will let the Hulu Press Release explain:
“A psychological-horror series set in the Stephen King multiverse, Castle Rock combines the mythological scale and intimate character storytelling of King’s best-loved works, weaving an epic saga of darkness and light, played out on a few square miles of Maine woodland. Castle Rock is an original suspense/thriller — a reimagining that explores the themes and worlds uniting the entire King canon, while brushing up against some of his most iconic and beloved stories.”

Of course, fans of Stephen King know of Castle Rock all too well. 35 works of King’s fiction feature or mention that fictional town in Maine. Starting with the Dead Zone in ’79 up to 2014’s Revival.
Castle Rock

J.J. Abrams went into a little more detail when appearing on a recent episode of The Tonight Show. As well as describing the surreal experience of watching 2005’s The Descent with the author in a movie theater.

[Via] The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon