David Frost Interviews Vincent Price (1970)

There are many, many reasons to love the works of Vincent Price. He was an actor who carried himself with dignity and aplomb in spite of some of his roles. In particular I ask you to take a look at 1965’s Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine and its 1966 sequel Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs. On the other hand – Vincent Price always appeared to be having fun playing his parts.
Vincent Price - Theater of Blood

Even in spite of playing vile villains like in The Abominable Dr. Phibes, the fun shone through in his performance. I ask you to explain how else audiences were kind of rooting for Phibes to win!

I became a fan of Vincent Price very early in my youth.

I believe I first saw him in a Roger Corman film. One of the Edgar Allan Poe adaptations that played on the Late, Late Show after midnight had rolled around. Generally speaking I would watch any horror movie…but I came to love seeing Price’s name in the credits.

Vincent Price had 200 acting credits to his name when he passed away in 1993. Many of those credits included dramas and adventure films – however we still know him best for his horror roles. Although this may be true, I think we see the true gentleman in this 1970 interview with David Frost. In addition we see that humorous side of the actor, in particular when he discusses being part of a strip tease number during a World War II fundraiser!
Vincent Price - David Frost Interview

In this eight minute interview I think you will be reminded why Price still manages to charm us today. Not just the humor but the honesty, like when he talks about working with Victor Mature. In his gentlemanly way he shares some secrets about 1954’s Dangerous Mission.

So without further ado let us watch this 1970 interview between David Frost and Vincent Price!

[Via] Andrew Peel


1984 PAAS Halloween Make-Up Kits Commercial

Halloween make-up kits were rarely used in my youth. While they might have been safer – at least in terms of no costume to get tangled up in. They couldn’t compare to the majesty of dressing up as Boba Fett, Darth Vader, and Stormtroopers.

I might also add that the lure to play the hero was incredibly strong during Halloween. How could a kid resist donning the garb of Superman, Wonder Woman, or even Batman?

At the same time there was definitely one year at least where Halloween make-up kits reigned supreme. These were the very same make-up kits that PAAS was advertising on television in 1984. I was twelve and found myself attending church related “Fall” events. After all we were not supposed to be celebrating Halloween, right?

Of course that didn’t stop a parade of Werewolves…


And even restless spirits traipsing up and down the halls filling our sacks with delicious loot.

Now is just so happened to be that I was invited to three different celebrations that year. Two at churches and one at school. None of them being held on Halloween itself of course. The PAAS Halloween make-up kits were available at our local grocery store and quite cheap. In the light of this discovery I was able to wear three of the four kits in this 1984 commercial!

[Via] The Creepy TarHeel

I was a veritable Lon Chaney Sr. as I proudly became a Vampire one night, Werewolf the next, and finally a Ghost! Although I have absolutely no fear of clowns they’ve never been my thing.

Halloween make-up kits had their downsides!

Now I will not argue that the make-up kits definitely made it easier to see, with no mask to obstruct your vision. But to be honest they had some problems too:

  • The chemical smell really messed with my eyes – I’m not sure if I was allergic or what. They would just start to water if a breeze or AC was blowing in my face.
  • The face paint was easy to smear and you had to be careful to make sure that obviously nothing touched your face.
  • The plastic teeth would shred your gums – to be fair this had equally the same result with any plastic teeth back in the day.

Be that as it may, the memories of those three Halloween events remain very vivid. All thanks to the PAAS Halloween make-up kits!


Don’t Forget Fruit Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy!

Some of the most popular sets of cereals around Halloween are General Mills Monster Cereals – Count Chocula, Franken Berry, and Boo-Berry.

People forget that there used to be two other Monster Cereals – Fruit Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy.
A few days ago, Vic Sage posted You’ll Look Killer In These Monster Cereal Shirts! These t-shirts are great, but I wondered why Fruit Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy didn’t get t-shirts.

Over on Twitter, Dean Compton had the same thoughts. Dean told Vic and I that this year, Funko released some really cool Monster Cereals Dorbz.

At the New York Comic Con: Toy Tokyo, they released two exclusives:
This cool three pack of Count Chocula, Franken Berry, and Boo-Berry.

And this really great Count Chocula Ridez.

That car is too cool! I really like how you can see the engine and I also like the bat on the front of the car.

At the end of September, Funko also released Dorbz of Fruit Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy!

These awesome figures can keep you company while you’re waiting for General Mills to re-release Fruit Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy again like they did in 2013.

A special thanks to my good friend Dean for telling me about these awesome Dorbz.

Dean is the world’s biggest fan of Marvel Comics’ the Punisher, and he runs an amazing blog about 90s comics called The Unspoken Decade, and co-hosts the radio talk show
Her Dork World, His Dork World. I made a cameo once on Her Dork World, His Dork World, and amazingly, it is still on the air!

Please stop by my pop culture food blog – Between the Pages to see lots of cool Halloween Treats.


Come And Visit The 1974 Horror Hall Of Fame

The Horror Hall of Fame was a 1974 TV special, hosted by Vincent Price. A show that originally aired on February 20 on the ABC Network. It was a mixture of a talk show with comedy skits and in addition clips from classic horror films. I think you will agree though the greatest moments are the interviews that Price conducts.

The list of guest stars for this special include Frank Gorshin. While probably best known for his role as the Riddler on the ’66 Batman – Gorshin was a quite capable impressionist. Something that you will see in great effect as he pulls off a wonderful Boris Karloff.

John Carradine. This segment is probably my favorite. It is very informative for one thing, with Carradine revealing he was up for the role in 1931’s Frankenstein. As a matter of fact I wish they had included more discussions between Vincent and John. As these two friends discussing their own roles together with those actors who are being honored on the show is captivating.

Other guests on the special include John Astin, Candy Clark, William Tuttle, and Raymond McNally. Co-starring in the program is Billy Van who plays a hunchbacked assistant to Price. Van might be known best for his roles in the The Hilarious House of Frightenstein from 1971. A Canadian children’s series that Price appeared in too!

[via] Kabuki Wolf

Why didn’t they make more Horror Hall of Fame specials?

There were other specials but not connected that I can tell. For three years beginning in 1990 until 1992 – Robert Englund hosted an awards show with the same name. One that celebrated the best horror films, actors, special effects, and TV series. It is a totally different beast though with actual awards being presented.

With the 1974 Horror Hall of Fame it was less formal. I will admit that some of the comedy doesn’t quite work but overall it has charm and in spades. I feel that with Halloween being only eleven days away it is definitely worthy of your viewing time!

Giraffe Robots


Addams Family Stretching Room Portraits

The Addams Family, the Munsters, and the Weirdly Gruesomes are three fictional families that I could see living in The Haunted Mansion. Melissa Doskotz obviously had the same idea because she created these wonderful Addams Family Stretching Room Portraits. These and other cool prints can be purchased at Melissa’s MellenIllustration Etsy Store.

Want more Haunted Mansion goodies?

Please stop by my pop culture food blog – Between the Pages. I’ve featured tons of cool Haunted Mansion Treats.


Did you go as H.R. Pufnstuf’s WITCHIEPOO for Halloween?

If you were to go as any character from a Sid & Marty Krofft children’s television program, none would be more appropriate for a creepy Halloween costume than practically every character found in 1969’s H.R. PUFNSTUF. I was a toddler when H.R. PUFNSTUF was first regularly broadcasting on television and I found that show both fascinating and frightening at the same time. There’s not a single individual found in this kindertraumatizing TV series who wouldn’t make a spooky subject for a costume.

One of the creepiest, and yet comical, characters of the show is none other than the main villain herself, Witchiepoo.


Thanks to the Collegeville Flag & Manufacturing Company of Collegeville, Pennsylvania, children during the 1970s were able to go out on Halloween in costume as the cackling witch of Living Island, Wilhelmina W. Witchiepoo.


She is just one of two actual “real” persons in the show, Witchiepoo being portrayed by Billie Hayes while the other being the main protagonist Jimmy played by Jack Wild. The rest of the show’s cast are life-sized puppets and fully-costumed actors. You see, Living Island is a place where everything is, well, living!

If you’ve never had the pleasure of seeing H.R. PUFNSTUF before, here’s the opening title sequence and the end credits to dazzle your eyes…

[source: youtube: TeeVees Greatest]

The Witchiepoo costume is a standard dimestore boxed kit with a plastic mask and vinyl smock. Even though the mask is an excellent rendition of the character as portrayed by the show’s actress Billie Hayes, the artwork on the smock is hardly an accurate image of  Witchiepoo as seen in the show.


This particular Witchiepoo mask is the latter version put out by Collegeville. There are a few earlier versions where she has equal amounts of witchy auburn hair on both sides of her witchy face, even one with dayglo red “real hair”. The version I have is apparently the Vroom Broom windswept look.



There are many other characters from H.R. PUFNSTUF who have been made into Halloween costumes, including the title character himself, and there are costumes of many other characters from many other Sid & Marty Krofft productions. The Witchiepoo costume is perhaps one of the more endearing of them. Witchiepoo is one of those laughable villains who, even though she may pose a threat to the show’s heroes, is in actuality her own worst enemy. Witchiepoo can never win because her own nature won’t allow that to happen. She’s very much a frustrated victim of her own shortcomings.

As a kid, that can be very relatable. Which is why there were children who dressed as Witchiepoo for Halloween back in the Seventies.


Too bad the Vroom Broom wasn’t included.

Type “pufnstuf” in the Retroist site’s search bar to see more great posts such as:

Freddy the Flute