Did You Pop Yer Top For This 1968 Boardgame?

It’s my belief. My personal belief mind you – that board games were quite a bit more popular back in the 60s and 70s. In addition I think that they had a more imaginative approach to the designs of the game. Just a couple of weeks ago I shared that incredible 1979 Alien board game as a case in point.

Having said that I think the 80s had some amazing board games too of course. Many of them were movie tie-in’s like The Goonies. But you also had offerings that relied on other media – like 1988’s Shrieks and Creaks that used an audio cassette.

And it’s a fact there are some INCREDIBLE games being made today. Just off the top of my head I can’t recommend Inis, 7 Wonders, or Betrayal at House on the Hill enough.

Those games however are not exactly designed for children – or furthermore quick to finish. Which is why I try to seek out the older board games. Generally for the use of the arcade but some of them are for my personal collection. Of course looking for worthy games is half the fun and thankfully we have YouTube to help make things a little easier.

[Via] Chris Hanson

Which is of course how I found this 1968 game from Milton Bradley. Pop Yer Top tasked Players on their turn to take control of the Koo-Koo bird.

Following the steps printed on the board – through two safe zones to reach the winner’s spot. Make sure to check out the degrees Koo-Koo goes to in those safe zones to ensure he doesn’t pop his top.

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

There are no dice used in the Pop Yer Top. Instead a Player pushes their luck with each press of the wacky bird on the game board.
Pop Yer Top

The Players have no clue of course at which point Koo-Koo will pop his top.

If that happens the Player must go all the way back to the starting area. I’ve been able to find a few copies of Pop Yer Top for purchase on ebay. They range from a mere $12 to $33. Not a bad price for such a fun game if you ask me.

I really want to thank the always impressive BoardGameGeek for the image used at the top of the post as well as the board itself.

Granted if I do pick up a copy of Pop Yer Top I will have to look into Koo-Koo’s eyes for quite some time. His all-knowing eyes!


C-3PO

Did You Know that C-3P0 Is Licensed To Kill?

[Via] Boy B Blue
Though I’m a fan of Star Wars and the old James Bond Movies with Sean Connery and Roger Moore, I’ve never thought about mixing them together. I do think that Harrison Ford would be an interesting and rather unconventional James Bond and Sean Connery would be a great Jedi Master.
C3-PO

Plastic Ham, who sells his great mash-up action figures on Etsy, had an even cooler idea. What if everyone’s favorite Protocol Droid was really a Secret Agent? Jay came up with Agent 3-PO. Be careful, I hear he is fluent in over six millions forms of combat.
C-3PO
I really like that Jay doesn’t just create cool action figures, he also creates custom packaging for each figure.

Want more Star Wars and James Bond goodies?

Please stop by my pop culture food blog – Between The Pages. I’ve featured some absolutely amazing James Bond Cakes and Star Wars Cakes.

Alien - Board Game

Did You Play 1979’s Alien Board Game?

When it comes to merchandise for 1979’s masterpiece Alien. I feel the epitome of surprise comes from the fact that Kenner released an action figure. While Star Wars showed that kids loved science fiction toys – Alien was a horror film set in space. To say nothing that it was rated R, so it was kind of crazy that Kenner made an 18-inch figure in the first place.

[Via] Hitmon Tom

That is kind of a well known product. I certainly recall a bit of outrage from parent groups. As well as Siskel and Ebert showing off the figure – they too were dismayed and a little upset that Kenner made them. Of course now days those figures are highly sought after and demand a pretty penny from collectors.

As I’ve already said – I knew about the 18-inch action figure. What I didn’t know was just how far Kenner went with the marketing of the film. Releasing an Alien board game designed for children ages 7 and up?!
Alien - Board Game Objective

Players pick their favorite color, collecting three astronauts and one Xenomorph matching their color.

The Player of course is trying to lead their astronauts to the Nostromo’s escape shuttle – the Narcissus. Which is located in the center of the game board.

Fun fact. In the late great Dan O’Bannon’s original screenplay, the shuttle went by an entirely different name. It was simply called the Snark 2. The shuttle being christened Narcissus was thanks to the rewrite by David Giler and Walter Hill. Make sure to check out the really nicely painted images – scenes from Ridley Scott’s masterpiece.

Naturally a Player attempts to guide their Alien towards the opposing Player’s astronauts. Hunting them down one by one – obviously a Xenomorph can’t harm an astronaut of the same color. Thankfully there are some safe spots located on the board where one can hide from the intergalactic menace. Bear in mind the opposing Players are attempting the very same action.

Now that you’ve seen a bit of the Alien board game – why not check out this review by Think Bolt?


In addition you will get a close-up view of some of the fantastic artwork on the game board. Moreover I should add this looks in fact to be a pristine version of the game!

Star Trek Phaser Battle

This 1976 Star Trek Phaser Battle Game Is Amazing!

The other night while digging up some information on a future post. I came across Mego’s 1976 Star Trek Phaser Battle game. An electronic ‘handheld game’ that is just stunningly amazing. Placing the Player on the bridge of the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) to seek out and destroy enemy Klingon vessels.
Star Trek Phaser Battle

Of course it’s not like Mego wasn’t known in the 70s for making quality Star Trek products. Starting in 1974 they began manufacturing 8″ figures. The line of toys included characters that you would naturally assume they would release. Like Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy, Mr. Scott, Lt. Uhura, and a Klingon.

Which resulted in the incredibly rare 1975 USS Enterprise Gift Set!

[Via] Trek Movie

Doing a little research this morning I was able to find some interesting facts about the Star Trek Phaser Battle game. It was rather expensive for the time. In 1976 it was being sold for $69.99 which would cost a little under $300 today. So obviously this electronic game had a hefty price tag. It was also quite large – measuring 13″ x 13″ by 16″.

Viewing the vintage television commercial below however…I have to say I think it would be worth it. Take a moment and check out all of the bells and whistles this game had to offer.

[Via] FyberOptic

Thanks to the Handheld Museum we can also scope out the front and back of the game box. While I really enjoy the back of the box – used at the top of the post, with Kirk, Chekov, and Sulu. I admit I get a chuckle out of Mr. Spock’s rather disdainful look at the child. At least that is how I read it.

Box art images courtesy of the Handheld Museum.


“Judging by your score, it is only logical to point out that a game of tic-tac-toe is more your speed.”

While the commercial for the Star Trek Phaser Battle game is impressive. How would you like to see it in action?

[Via] Sly DC

Computer Garage

Do You Remember 1972’s Sears Computer Garage?

You would think that in my youth I would have been attracted to more car toys. Especially a playset advertising itself as a Computer Garage. When you add in the fact that my Family had their own garage and auto dealership, it would obviously make sense that I wanted Hot Wheels and Matchbox cars to play with, right?

That was sadly not the case when I was growing up. Furthermore I would possibly have rather had dental work than receive toy cars. In the light of what I just said however there were a few “car” toys that I was happy to get. Like the Batmobile, or the General Lee from The Dukes of Hazzard as well as Ideal’s Evel Knievel’s Stunt Cycle!

[Via] Vintage TV Commercials

Consequently when my Cousin, Brandon, and I received that stunt cycle set on the same Christmas. There were EPIC charges of those toy daredevil’s at each other across the kitchen floor. How we managed to not trip any of our relatives while tiny Evel Knievel’s were darting everywhere I will never know.

Eventually I managed to amass a small but stylized collection of Hot Wheels and Matchbox vehicles. Thanks to various family members giving me their hand-me-down toys. In truth some of those fit my overall love of science-fiction toys at the time, fueled by 1977’s Star Wars naturally.

Which is in fact why when back in the day one Summer when I was with my Grandmother at a garage sale. I didn’t just pass by a rather odd looking playset – The Sears Computer Garage. Now even at that age, which was around eight I was very interested in all things related to computers. Thanks to brief encounters with the Commodore Vic-20 and the TRS-80.

I was intrigued by the playset which was basically a motorized gondola. When a kid would use the plastic numbers – a “coded” computer card. It would rotate to the number of the stall that had been selected. With the aid of a lever at the base of the Sears Computer Garage – the car would be ejected.
Computer Garage

Now in all honesty, there were two other reasons I wanted to buy it. It was only a mere fifty cents and worked to boot. But most importantly, inside one of the stalls I could see Captain America’s van!

Image courtesy of the Hot Wheels Wikia.

I was actually able to talk my Grandmother into giving me the money and took the Sears Computer Garage home. It basically acted as a storage unit for my tiny toy car collection. Until a couple of years later I in turn sold it at my Grandmother’s garage sale.

Thanks to MootSooToo’s YouTube channel you can see the Sears Computer Garage in action!

Rainbow Brite

Do You Recall Rainbow Brite Sprites At Taco Bell?

When Rainbow Brite hit the scene back in 1983 it took hold. Created by none other than Gary Glissmeyer, Cheryl Cozad, and Dan Drake of Hallmark Cards, Inc. Rainbow Brite had dolls and toys, produced by Mattel. In addition to the images of the more popular characters being found on clothing, bedding, and other media.

The sales of Rainbow Brite merchandise also led to an animated series in 1984. With Warner Bros. releasing the feature-length animated movie Rainbow Brite and the Star Stealer to theaters in 1985. An adventure that leads R.B. and the Color Kids to attempt to thwart a Winter on Earth. A supernatural and never-ending cold brought on by Stormy, the opposite of our heroine.
Rainbow Brite

There is of course a lot of songs included in the film. Naturally.

[Via] I-Mockery


With all of this popularity it only stands to reason that fast food giants of the time would jump in. Incredibly popular places like Taco Bell for example. Instead of focusing on offering R.B. dolls they wisely chose to sell Sprites. The hardworking and lovable companions to R.B. and the Color Kids.

[Via] Hai Karate 4

So now that you might be hungry for Taco Bell. This would be the perfect time to remind you that Rainbow Brite also had a cereal!

[Via] Retrostatic

Phantasm Ornament

Mondo’s Phantasm Ornament Is A Ball. Madballs Too!

I should absolutely clarify that statement. Mondo is totally offering the Sentinel Sphere as an ornament for your Christmas tree. I ask you, what is more festive than a Phantasm ornament? Who wouldn’t want to hang the deadly flying device of the Tall Man from 1979’s cult classic Phantasm on their bough? How can it get any better than that?

In this case I suppose the answer might be an ornament of the Tall Man himself. Although a strong argument could be made of course for the addition of the deadly Dwarves from the film.
phantasm-angus-scrimm-sentinels

However, it IS the time of year to be thankful. As always of course Mondo gives plenty of reasons for that.

Phantasm Ornament

All images courtesy of Mondo.


This has been given the blessing of the creator of Phantasm, Don Coscarelli. Of course. Which is why Mondo teamed up with Middle of Beyond to produce the Sentinel Sphere ornament.
Phantasm ornament
Seriously. How can you not want Phantasm’s Sentinel Sphere on your tree? Now you can hop right on over to Mondo’s Official shop site to order your very own.

Now how do you top the Phantasm ornament? With Madballs of course!

[Via] American Greetings Entertainment

Madballs was created in 1985 by American Greetings – that is totally right. The same company that dreamed up the Care Bears had a hand in this 80’s merchandising property. Why were these goofy balls so popular to kids in the mid-80s? For one thing all sorts of gross-out properties were popular at that time. I give you the Garbage Pail Kids as an prime example!
Garbage-Pail-Kids-cover

Now thanks to Mondo and Middle of Beyond you too can proudly display Horn Head, Slobulus, Dust Brain, and Skull Face on your tree! You can click here to visit Middle of the Beyond’s official site to purchase the Madballs ornaments.
madballs-christmas-ornaments-mondo

I can only presume by next year we will be able to purchase Inhumanoids and Beetlejuice ornaments!