Inferno - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Inferno (1984)

Friends, do you remember Inferno from back in 1984? Manufactured and distributed as well by the legendary Williams Electronics. This is another pick from Christopher Tupa for his Retro Arcade Art project that I have not had the pleasure of playing before. With Inferno you certainly have a mix of Wizard of Wor in addition to some Crystal Castles.

Furthermore the control scheme for Inferno has just a hint of Williams’ 1982 arcade hit Robotron 2084!
Inferno - Inferno arcade cabinet

I should add that most of us do not remember the game. That is of course because it was never widely distributed and it is also believed that only 6 arcade cabinets now exist. Although you can freely find it on MAME as well as the Internet Arcade Archive!

As for the gameplay, you are tasked with dispatching enemies found in the worlds of the Grand Lizard. These enemies which are small multi-colored and known as cyclops, can be shot with your laser.
Inferno - Cyclops

Doing so will destroy their bodies and leave their black souls behind. Which will then attempt to run into the open maw of the Grand Lizard at the top of the screen. You can make contact with the fleeing monsters and absorb their souls.
Inferno - Grand Lizard

Or instead attempt to follow them into the Grand Lizard’s waiting mouth to do battle in the Inferno Wave. Which is essentially a free for all with every bad guy aiming to take you down!
Inferno - Inferno Wave

In addition to the Cyclops you must also contend with the Tankov. A sentient tank threat that requires you to blow off its treads while positioned on a lower level of the maze. Then get on an equal level with the demonic tanks remains and shoot it again.

I’m not quite certain how to describe the character of the Nymph. Perhaps it best you just read the description from the game yourself?

Inferno is yet again another example of what made the Golden Age of Arcade games so great. The sometimes throw everything at the wall elements frequently worked in the games favor. Of course sometimes that didn’t work as well. But here we are 33 years later, enjoying CTupa’s artwork that was based on a game that never was widely released, right?

Now remember that with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s official site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

Now that you know a little about Inferno, why not watch the game in action?

[Via] JSBO

Be sure to check out the earlier entries for the Retro Arcade Art project by CTupa!
(Beezer)
(Bomb Jack)
(Devil Fish)
(Dig Dug)

Dig Dug -Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Dig Dug (1982)

Friends, feast your eyes on Christopher Tupa‘s Dig Dug illustration! Not only is it CTupa’s pick for this weeks Retro Arcade Art. Obviously. But it also happens to be one of my favorite video games as well. Much like Pac-Man, there are elements of Dig Dug that match maze games. However in this case you are pretty much making your own maze as you dig through a treacherous underground setting.
Dig Dug - Marquee

Dig Dug was released by Atari in the arcades of North America in May of 1982. However it was actually developed and published by an equally legendary game company – Namco.

Dig Dug -Arcade Flyer Archive

Image courtesy of the Arcade Flyer Archive

Certainly most of you that frequent the Retroist or enjoy classic gaming will know how this game works. Players are tasked with guiding Dig Dug, as he was known in the first game, as you tunnel through the stratum that makes up each level. The character’s goal is clearing out a collection of motley monsters below the surface of the Earth. With only the aid of an air pump to help him dispatch the beasties as well as boulders scattered about the stage.

Using the air pump, a Player will hit the pump button three or four times, which inflates a foe until it expands so much it pops. If you do not pump the enemy until they explode they will slowly deflate and come after you again. The problem is the Pookas and Fygars rarely come at the Player one at a time beyond the first few rounds. The enemy can even travel through the dirt for a sneak attack, trying to catch you from the left and right as well as up and down. This of course requires a great deal of juggling in the later stages!

Oh, the amount of Pookas and Fygars that met their grim fates over dozens of Saturday afternoons at the Showbiz Pizza of my youth. In truth if we counted them all I would probably be brought up on charges by a video game court.
Dig Dug - Characters

Dig Dug was certainly a hit for both companies. Game cabinets being produced for upright, cocktail and even cabaret units. For those of you that might not have seen a cabaret version. It basically was a smaller upright, designed of course for arcades and other locations where space might be a premium.
Dig Dug - Cabaret

Dig Dug didn’t find success in just the arcades. It had brisk sales for the popular consoles and home computers of the day as well. Ports could be found on the Atari 2600, 5200, and 7800 systems. Besides the Atari computers the VIC-20 and Commodore 64 received ports as did IBM PC and TI-99/4A.
Dig Dug - Atari 2600

Besides the awesome artwork that CTupa provides for his Retro Art Blog entries. I am glad to constantly find out facts I hadn’t known. Case in point that the Intellivision DID receive a home port of the game. It was in 1987 though, programmed by Mark Kennedy…when he was working for Atarisoft I should add.
Dig Dug - Intellivision

Apparently Mark added two Easter eggs to his port. One of them allows you to experience a different title screen. The second though lets you play an entirely second game entitled Deadly Dogs. Which is TRON Deadly Discs but instead of TRON and the warriors of the MCP. You are the hot dogs from Burger Time!

That is pretty crazy, right? Now remember that with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s official site to contact him as well as check out more artwork from his project!

Now that you know a bit about Dig Dug. Why not enjoy this commercial that was originally shown in move theaters?

[Via] Scottith Games

Make sure to also enjoy the earlier entries for the Retro Arcade Art By CTupa!
(Beezer)
(Bomb Jack)
(Devil Fish)

Devil Fish - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Devil Fish (1982)

Devil Fish - Marquee
Devil Fish is a game that I can certainly say I’ve not heard of before. It was however an arcade title released back in June of 1982 by Artic Electronics. A bit of Lock ‘N’ Chase with maybe a little Mouse Trap thrown in. Devil Fish is another prime example of how the Golden Age of arcade games were pretty imaginative. As well of course as being this weeks Retro Arcade Art offering from Christopher Tupa!

Devil Fish is one of many popular maze related titles from the early 80s. I would say that Pac-Man is of course the greatest example of the maze genre. Obviously. With Devil Fish though you have the added bonus of playing a well meaning dog. Sea Dog as a matter of fact who has been tasked by the King of the Sea to get rid of the rampaging Devil Fish.

Devil Fish - Arcade Flyer Archive

Image courtesy of the Arcade Flyer Archive.

Those titular villains have escaped from their underwater prison and are making a mess of the King’s sea garden. They look very much like multicolored Octopi. So Sea Dog must attempt to lure the beasts with bait, in this case fish. The player drops the bait in an attempt to fatten the Devil Fish where they get stuck in the narrower passages of the maze.
Devil Fish - Stage 1

Once an enemy is trapped, Sea Dog can scoop them up and deposit them in a cabin. Why? Because each Devil Fish that he drops off reveals the image of the beastie hiding in the garden. Once it is fully revealed Sea Dog heads to the next stage.
Devil Fish - Stage 3

Now that you know a little about Devil Fish, check out the gameplay!

[Via] Old Classic Retro Gaming


Remember that with CTupa’s Retro Arcade Art project, you can purchase the artwork featured in this post. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s official site to contact him as well as check out more artwork and even listen to his podcasts!

Now make sure to enjoy the earlier entries for the Retro Arcade Art By CTupa!


Retro Arcade Art 1 (Beezer)
Retro Arcade Art 2 (Bomb Jack)

Bomb Jack - Christopher Tupa

Retro Arcade Art By CTupa: Bomb Jack (1984)

Bomb Jack - Marquee
Friends, how many of you recall Bomb Jack? It was an arcade title that was developed as well as manufactured by Tehkan in 1984. It is also as a matter of fact, the subject of this week’s Retro Arcade Art by Christopher Tupa.

Bomb Jack - Flyer

Flyer courtesy of the Arcade Flyer Archive.

While Tehkan might not sound familiar. I am certainly positive you know them by their current company name. Which is Tecmo! Bomb Jack proved popular enough by the way that it received three sequels. Bomb Jack Twin was another arcade game with Mighty Bomb Jack and Bomb Jack II for home consoles and computers.
Bomb Jack - Mighty Bomb Jack - NES

Just before I jump into the mechanics of Bomb Jack I will remind you of CTupa’s new art project. The artist will be sharing one new illustration a week for the foreseeable future. Furthermore they are all based off the Golden Age of video games.

As an added bonus you can pick up each of the Retro Arcade Art offerings. The originals are ink and watercolor and are 5″x7″ on 8.5″x11″ size paper. You can hop on over to Christopher’s official site to contact him as well as check out more artwork and even listen to his podcasts!

Bomb Jack tasks players with controlling Jack. Obviously. A superhero who must travel throughout time and pick up the red bombs scattered across the stages. While avoiding contact with the numerous enemies that populate the level. Fortunately for our hero he can jump super high and even float.

There is a bonus when players pick up the bombs after the fuse has been lit. Doing so will cause the meter at the top of the screen to expand. Once it is totally full it will release a circular and bouncing letter P. If Jack nabs that he becomes invincible as well as the enemies transforming into bonus coins to be picked up.
Bomb Jack - Power Up

In addition the player can pick up other bonuses. Such as the letter B, which will increase your score multiplier by 5. On the other hand there is also E that gives Players and extra Bomb Jack. Last but not least we have S which is the rarer bonus and it will give you an entirely free game.

Now why not take a few minutes and check out the game play for Bomb Jack

[Via] Classic Game Videos

Make sure to enjoy the earlier entry for the Retro Arcade Art By CTupa!


Retro Arcade Art 1 (Beezer)