Does Jason Scheff Remember To Be “Young”?

You know, because when you’re one of the lead singers of a band whose average age (in the mid-1980s) was at least 40, you may forget how “young” you really are. I wonder if Jason Scheff ever actually had that problem…

Fangirl Love And College Acceptance

I write about Chicago alot.

I’m aware of my obvious fangirl love, and it is something I will never deny.

That said…

For me, college feels like a lifetime ago, and in reality, it was actually 16 years ago when I received my acceptance letter. The nail-biting and worrying from the time the application goes into the mail to the time the determination letter arrives is the pits, but it is worth it when the hard work pays off.

My high school gradation photo – class of 2001.

A few days after I graduated from college (in December 2005), I was job hunting, when a movie came on HBO that sounded interesting enough to take me away from my job-hunting for a little while. Ironically, it was about the end of high school life struggle of getting into the college of your choice. I appreciated the movie then, but liked it even more a few years later while watching Fox Movie Channel. That movie was How I Got Into College, and is the 100%* relatable story of what we do, and how we stress out, while trying to get into the college we want to attend.

*It is a bit overdramatic.

Me graduating from the college I wanted to attend. College graduation photo from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (now Stockton University), class of 2005.

The Theme Song

While I was watching the movie, I took notice of a song that played during the Obligatory Montage Scene that the best 1980s movies are, by law**, required to have.

**Absolute truth.

I also took notice of the song used during said Obligatory Montage Scene, which sounded like someone very familiar, singing a song about staying young. Of course, I wasn’t really well-versed with Chicago vocalists at the time, so it was almost mind-blowing that Peter Cetera would be involved with a song about youth. I mean, he was clearly 40-something in 1989, right?

The truth cracks me up to this day. Silly girl, that’s not Peter Cetera singing about youth, that’s an incredible sound-alike!

“But He Sounds JUST LIKE HIM!”

I forever got Peter Cetera and Jason Scheff’s voices mixed up years ago. As it turns out, that isn’t difficult. Turns out that this “misstep” can be forgiven. For instance, I’ll forgive you for your mistake. It is ok, you are allowed to make that mistake. You are human.

But all that aside, Jason Scheff was the youngest member of a group who had not only been around since the late 1960s, but took over as one of their lead vocalists at the age of 23. That’s a big job – a group that had been together for almost 20 years, you’re barely older than that, and you’ve got an impressive catalog of songs to sing?

He handled himself well. For 31 years.

As a solo artist, Jason Scheff provided the vocals to the Obligatory Montage Scene from How I Got Into College, and while I can’t find that montage on You Tube (probably because the movie is from 20th Century Fox, and I don’t believe their stuff can be posted on You Tube), I can find you that song. And what looks like a music video to go with it.

Uploaded by Sai Guzman

And this is the full song, without any kind of music video attached.

Uploaded by Music 80s AOR

Movie Availability

As for How IGot into College, this movie is as difficult to track down as this song was for years!

I did find the DVD of this movie on Amazon, but it is expensive (as of this writing, the DVD is $26.85). Your best bet would be to track down a used copy. I ran into this problem in 2009 when I wanted to buy the DVD of it, and couldn’t even get it. I wound up recording (almost wrote “taping”!) the movie from Fox Movie Channel to a DVD that year. If you haven’t seen it, it is worth the watch.

And as for Jason Scheff, he’s not “young” anymore, but he did continue to make a name for himself as the bassist and lead vocalist of Chicago until leaving the group in October 2016. But during his tenure, he made beautiful music, and even made “Street Player” sound like a halfway decent Chicago song. So he was obviously doing something right, even after he was trying to be “forever young.”

Yeah, I’ll stop.

Allison’s Note: I’ve had this song on my iPod for a few years (since about 2010), but didn’t know at the time who Jason Scheff was. It was actually several years before I really started listening to Chicago and made the connection. I was inspired to write this article after listening to this song the other day, and remember how hard the song (and movie!) were to come across at the time.

Have You Ever Heard This Song Richard Dean Anderson Composed for a “MacGyver” Episode?

Guess what?  You’re going to hear it, as well as see copious amounts of Richard Dean Anderson as MacGyver. :-)

You’re welcome.

Love At First Sight…

I first started watching MacGyver in the early spring of 2009, while on a seasonal layoff from my job at the time. The first episode I saw was season three’s “The Negotiator,” The episode involved a planned building site for a marina, Mac researching the wildlife in the area to prove that the project is not a good idea, and a beautiful woman hired to persuade Mac to change his mind, by any means necessary.

I can guarantee there are plenty of women out there who would have tried #3.

Facebook, circa 1988.

I’m not exactly sure if it was great “first episode ever” material, but I bought the season one boxed set pretty soon thereafter. Does that give you an idea of how much I liked it?

And at least it wasn’t the last episode ever made. I’ve made that mistake before…

Anyway…

He’s Got Mad Guitar Skills!

There was a scene in the episode where the “Negotiator,” Deborah, has bugged his house. As she listens to his going-abouts, she is entering information about him into her computer. And it is during this time that we hear him break out his guitar. Because we’ve never seen him do this before so…no time like the present?

Uploaded by Mary-Kate

But this, of course, is a little preview of what is to come later…

An 80s movie-style montage, complete with romance music!

In this case, it is a different arrangement of this same song, which I later found out is called “Eau d’Leo.” The song has the distinction of being composed by Richard Dean Anderson, thus adding another facet to the man I fell in love with from this very first watching.

Ok, well, I fell in love with this Everyman of a character he played, but still, love.

Ladies and gents, sit back, relax, and let the Adult Contemporary smoothness take you away!

Uploaded by MacGyver Online

But Wait, There’s More…

Because well enough means more clips of Mac for your viewing pleasure, You Tube user kitfu choong made this lovely video possible. It is a montage of clips from other MacGyver episodes, and I’d like to think it is the perfect way to close this article out.

Let’s see if New MacGyver can do anything quite like this.*

*Allison likes New MacGyver. But she prefers Original MacGyver.

Boy Wonder, I Love You

Zappa, Burt Ward and “Boy Wonder, I Love You”

As a kid I inherited a bunch of cassettes from my older sisters. Between those and what I could scrounge up at neighborhood garage sales, I had a decent collection. Some of my favorite cassettes were not the big artists, but oddball ones. Often they were rerecorded copies of copies. To me this just made them more mysterious. I love popping them into my single speaker tape player and finding some mysterious recording. The song Boy Wonder, I Love You was a song I found on one these cassettes.

It is an odd song, sung by the not so modest Boy Wonder himself, Burt Ward. The song is strange. Consisting of some music sound effects and the spoken word stylings of Ward. Boy Wonder, I Love You, should be a total mess, but there was genius behind this work. That genius was Frank Zappa. The music you hear in the song was provided by his Mothers of Inventions.

Watch Frank Zappa on Nickelodeon’s Livewire

According to Ward:

Their fearless leader and king of grubbiness was the late Frank Zappa. After recording with me, Frank became an internationally recognized cult superstar, which was understandable; after working with me, the only place Frank could go was up.

Although he looked like the others, Frank had an intelligence and education that elevated him beyond brilliance to sheer genius. I spent a considerable amount of time talking with him, and his rough, abrupt exterior concealed an intellectual, creative and sensitive interior.

In addition to Boy Wonder, I Love You, they also recorded the song, Orange Colored Sky. Which many modern gamers might know from the Nat King Cole version that they use in Fallout 4. Ward is not a great vocalist, so while he saw the genius in Zappa, he did not seem to appreciate the singing he did on the album. Listening to it, he is probably right. Although, it sounds like Zappa made the most out of a bad situation.

While Orange Colored Sky is a challenge to enjoy, Boy Wonder, I Love You is a wonderful novelty song gem.

Listen to Burt Ward perform Boy Wonder, I Love You

Listen to Burt Ward perform Orange Colored Sky

ELO

ELO: The Video Game – A Soundtrack To A Game That Never Was

In an age when Beatles Rock Band is old hat, It’s hard to remember a time when video game “product placements” or celebrity connections were a rarity, and kind of a big deal: Atari slapping Pele’s name on a new soccer cartridge, Mattel Electronics securing permission to emblazon every new sports video game with the name and logo of that sport’s professional league, or the one that started it all, a 1976 arcade, game awfully similar to Night Driver, called Datsun 280 ZZZAP!.

[Via] Hirudov gaming

And then there was Journey. Around 1983, you’d be hard pressed to find a bigger radio hit than Separate Ways (Worlds Apart). That synth line, the one that leads the whole song off, was practically made to be turned into video game music. Journey inspired two video games – a fantastic Midway arcade game, and the quirky but enjoyable Journey Escape for the Atari 2600.

[Via] MY SATURDAY M0RNINGS

Read: Celebrate Atari Day With Journey Escape And MTV!

But what if another band had been in the right place at the right time to cash in on the video craze?

That’s the idea behind another project perhaps best described as “quirky but enjoyable” – a soundtrack for ELO: The Video Game that was never, in fact, made.
ELO
The free downloadable “ELO: The Video Game” album from online label Pterodactyl Squad re-imagines several of the band’s singles, and a few lesser-known tunes, as chiptunes – as they would sound as music for intros, level-up animations, and even boss battles.
ELO
It’s a little disconcerting seeing the ELO spaceship – a fixture of the band’s album covers since 1977 – spewing missiles at everything within sight on the artwork for this release, but it’s a fun (and fast) listen.

Now someone just needs to create a game to go with the music.