Toho

What If Toho Had Done The Kong: Skull Island Trailer?

Well, I guess Toho has actually done Kong: Skull Island itself when you get down to it. At least in regards to certain elements of Toho’s King Kong vs. Godzilla from 1962 getting a nod in the upcoming Kong: Skull Island film. Case in point the addition of a giant octopus in the new movie.

A kaiju eiga in fact that was seen in Toho’s own 1962 movie. However in that film it involved the use of an actual living octopus.
Toho

Which furthermore necessitated the addition of an octopus wrangler on the set.
Toho

Perhaps this is what inspired Gorizard to create this fan made trailer. A look at how Kong: Skull Island might be handled if Toho had released the movie in ’62!

I want to thank Daniel XIII for the heads up on that bit of awesomeness. I have watched it a couple of times now and it never fails to bring a smile to my face.

Of course with the upcoming Kong: Skull Island film by Jordan Vogt-Roberts. The Kong mythos is getting a reboot – in addition to giving us a new take on the character. It has set the events of the film squarely in the 2014 Godzilla universe. Which began Legendary and Warner Bros. “MonsterVerse” in partnership with Toho of course.

The link between films so far is the Monarch organization. A scientific outfit that was responsible for the investigation of Godzilla in the 2014 film. I should point out that the 2014 comic book prequel Godzilla: Awakening reveals the secret outfit was formed in 1946 to seek out and catalog massive unidentified terrestrial organisms.

I am guessing that Monarch is behind sending in the team in Kong: Skull Island. As evidence suggests in this television spot – to say nothing of the Godzilla reference by the nuclear test footage and John Goodman’s character!

[Via] Comicbook.Com

Regardless of all that, it is important to realize the true point of the MonsterVerse. The eventual meeting of both King Kong and Godzilla. The last time these two iconic titans tussled was one of the greatest Kaiju battles in cinematic history. Imagine what will happen the next time these two meet?

Now that you have had a chance to see what might have been Toho’s version of Kong: Skull Island. Why not check out a trailer for King Kong vs. Godzilla

[Via] TJ

My Bloody Valentine - Saturday Frights

Saturday Frights Vidcast: My Bloody Valentine (1981)

Friends, with it being February the 14th, it seemed the perfect time to discuss My Bloody Valentine. Now granted the Projectionist and I haven’t resurrected the Saturday Frights Podcast. But we did in fact decided to put together a special – a vidcast of sorts. Concerning the 1981 Canadian slasher film, the classic My Bloody Valentine!

In the vidcast, which runs about fifteen minutes. I share not just some of the elements I love most about the movie. Additionally I must admit that this is in fact probably my favorite film in the slasher genre. But furthermore the Projectionist and I also give a few fun facts about the film itself. As well as the 2009 remake by Lionsgate – My Blood Valentine 3D.

With this in mind, I do feel I should admit this isn’t going to be like the podcast. At no point do I go into the synopsis of the film itself. On the other hand we do bring up the soundtrack, in particular the memorable Ballad of Harry Warden. Which if you count yourself as fan, the soundtrack is available at Waxwork Records!

Image is courtesy of Waxwork Records.

So when you get a moment of free time, check out the vidcast. Perhaps the Projectionist and I will convince you that a horror movie is the perfect thing to watch today?

From the Projectionist and myself – we wish you all a very Happy Valentine’s Day!

Battlestar Galactica

Atari Was Making A Battlestar Galactica Laserdisc Game?!

Battlestar Galactica was required viewing in my youth. Of course it didn’t hurt the television series that in 1978 everyone was in the grip of Star Wars fever. In fact I I saw the Battlestar Galactica movie, which was an abridged version of the TV pilot, at the 62 Drive-In of my youth.

ReMastered By JDG

My notebooks at school were chock full of doodles featuring Stormtroopers as well as Cylon Warriors. Although I regret to say that I wasn’t lucky enough to receive very many of the toys. However I did get my hands on Mattel’s Cylon Centurion figure. Moreover it became a rival bounty hunter for Boba Fett in my Star Wars toy universe.

So in other words, I was a pretty big fan of the short lived Battlestar Galactica series. What I was not remotely aware of until yesterday though, was that Atari had plans on a laserdisc game. I found out about it thanks to Patrick Barnes who posted on the Diary of An Arcade Employee Facebook Page. It was back in 1984 that Atari began work on a conversion kit for another of their laserdisc titles – Firefox.

Image courtesy of the Arcade Flyer Archive.

Sadly the Battlestar Galactic arcade game never saw the light of day. On the positive side at least there exists this test footage of the proposed arcade title.


Uploaded by Scottith Games to his YouTube account!

Furthermore he shares an interview with a designer of the game. Owen Rubin who worked on such classic games as Battlezone, Space Duel and Major Havoc:
“With Galactica, it was my idea originally as I was a Galactica fan obviously, (those are Cylon ships in Major Havoc, and the graphics displays in the tactical display were drawn like in Galactica as well), the guys who did Star Wars and Firefox started the project. I did a small amount of work as well. All that was really done was some footage on the laserdisc that let you land a fighter ship into one of the landing bays on either side of the large ship.

The video on the disc is recorded in such a way that playing it back would look like garbage. It is a bunch of still frames that you play out of order so that you can change what you are playing seamlessly. For example, the landing footage is one of 9 to 16 or so frames from different positions as you approach the landing bay. Imaging a 3×3 of 4×4 grid of possible positions you can approach from, with the center being straight on. If you fly straight, the program would display every 9th frame which was the video of flying straight.
Battlestar Galactica - Landing Bay
If you moved right, you would select the proper “frame view” and it would look like you moved in the video to the right, and now play every 9th “right position 1″ video frame in order. With this scheme, you could fly in 2 dimensions with the joystick while the game pushed you forward in the third as well, controlled by a throttle.”

It most certainly isn’t every single day that you learn about such a video game project. I want to thank Patrick Barnes once again as well as Scottith Games for documenting what might be lost arcade game history.

Now that you’ve learned about the Battlestar Galactica arcade game. How about you watch the 1998 trailer for the reboot of the series that the late and great Richard Hatch conceived?

[Via] Peter Noble

Let’s Play 1984’s The Temple Of Doom Board Game!

By the time that Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom hit theaters back on May 23, 1984. I was impatiently counting the days up until it’s release. When my Father and I finally had the chance to see it, I was all set to join Indiana Jones again and brave that Temple of Doom.

Film Trailers

Of course it helped that television ads were all over the place. It must be remembered as well that Raiders of the Lost Ark kind of took everyone by surprise in 1981. It seemed like the studio was truly doing its best to get the word out about Temple of Doom.

Having said that I must admit that I do not ever recall seeing the Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom board game back in the day. Thankfully this matter was corrected when the Arkadia Retrocade received a copy of it a few months back.

Joining me for this special event was none other than my fellow author on The Retroist, PLCary.

I must point out the nice design of the Temple of Doom board itself.
Temple of Doom

Each Player also receives a little board that connects to the main board – which features exciting moments from the film as well. Such as the plane crash, waterfall, the palace and of course Club Obi Wan!

After a go with the spinner, a Player must travel the full number of steps. At the very beginning you must choose to take the shorter path which is more dangerous. Or the longer path giving you more opportunities to avoid landing on a danger – sending you back precious steps or even to the beginning.

Dotted across the board are symbols featuring both Indy’s hat and whip and the visage of Mola Ram. When landing on these symbols a Player spins the spinner – if it matches the symbol you have landed upon, two outcomes take place. A match of symbols while on Indy’s hat means a Player can move a piece up to 3 spaces. Where as if you match while on Mola Ram’s symbol – you lose your next turn…probably trying to avoid having your heart ripped out.

Another key point is that a Player isn’t allowed to jump over another of their pieces. Which means there are moments in fact during the game where you are stuck. An opposing Player is allowed to land on your piece – placing your piece where they just were. An act by and large that can become beneficial in certain cases, especially when you enter the temple itself.
Temple of Doom

After navigating the treacherous temple, avoiding the sulfurous pitfalls. By foot or using the stairwells as shortcuts, you begin to move Indy, Willie, and Short Round to the appropriate colored mine carts. A Player must get all three of their playing pieces on the cart before they can race for the finish line.

In our game, while PLCary pulled ahead at the beginning – I made it through the mines first. But on the negative side you need an exact number to cross the rope bridge and win the game. All three of your pieces must have crossed before you can claim victory.

I was getting bad spins and PLCary easily caught up with me. It was a battle across the rope bridge but in the end I lucked out and managed to get all of my pieces across first.

Which in the spirit of Temple of Doom meant I of course paused to cut the rope bridge.


Generally speaking board games based on 1980’s franchises were something of a crapshoot. I can say though that the Temple of Doom game was exceptionally fun. If you can get your hands on it – it is most worth adding to your collection.

DuckTales - Retroist Scoreboard

The Retroist Scoreboard: DuckTales the Movie And More 2/8/2017

There’s a whole cottage industry surrounding the release of classic TV and movie soundtracks out there that you may not know about. Small labels, usually limited by musicians’ union rules to a releasing only 3,000 or so copies of a given title, unearth classic soundtracks that have often never been issued on CD before, or have only had a CD release featuring about half of the music that was included in the movie. Labels like Intrada, La-La Land Records, Perseverance, and Quartet Records release a steady stream of classic TV and movie scores throughout the year…and the Retroist Scoreboard is here to let you know what’s just dropped.

Intrada gets bragging rights this week with the first-time-ever-on-CD release of the complete score from 1990s DuckTales: The Movie, composed by David Newman (later of The Mighty Ducks, The Phantom, Galaxy Quest, Serenity, and many others). Weighing in at nearly the maximum possible length of an audio CD, it isn’t just that DuckTales hasn’t been on CD before, it’s never been released before in any form other than a couple of excerpts featured on a 1990 Disney compilation CD, The Disney Afternoon. Disney animation fans are ecstatic about this one, to say the least.
DuckTales - Retroist Scoreboard

As new titles are introduced, old ones sell out or are retired; Intrada is giving everyone until February 13th to buy the last remaining copies of the soundtracks from Disney’s Unidentifed Flying Oddball (1979, known to UK audiences as The Spaceman & King Arthur) and a two-fer CD with the Laurence Rosenthal scores from 1976’s Return Of A Man Called Horse and the 1999 TV movie remake of Inherit The Wind.

La-La Land Records has just released the score from the 1993 Sylvester Stallone flick Cliffhanger, scored by Trevor Jones (Excalibur, Time Bandits, The Dark Crystal, Labyrinth, Notting Hill, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen). As is often the case with La-La Land’s released, the first disc of the 2-CD set is the complete score (including never before heard tracks), while the second is a remastered reissue of the original 1993 album.

A gaggle of past La-La Land releases are about to go out of print forever, including David Newman’s The Phantom (1996), Tangerine Dream’s score from Wavelength (1983), a lavish 2-CD set of Alfred Newman’s A Certain Smile (1958), Mark Mancina’s score from 1995’s Money Train, Bill Conti’s score from I, The Jury (1982), Andrew Belling’s score from the 1977 Ralph Bakshi animated film Wizards, a selection of Brian Tyler’s music from the far more recent TV series Terra Nova, and a similar selection of music by Michael McCuistion, Lolita Ritmanis and Kristopher Carter from Batman: The Brave And The Bold. All of the retiring titles have been marked down while supplies last.

UK classical label Dutton Vocalian has jumped into the fray with a CD reissue of the original soundtrack album from Watership Down (1978), scored by Angela Morley (The Goon Show, Dynasty, Dallas), including the original album’s Art Garfunkel vocals and narration by Michael Hordern. The single disc is a hybrid SACD which is compatible with most garden-variety CD players, and for an import, it’s surprisingly affordable.

Looking further down the road, soundtrack specialty labels often let their customer base know if something is coming up that they might have to save up for. La-La Land – who has all but taken ownership of vintage Star Trek soundtrack releases in recent years – has announced that its first (yes, first) 4-CD box set of music from Star Trek: Voyager will land on February 28th. La-La Land’s Star Trek box sets tend to arrive at the $50-$60 price point, so start saving your quatloos now; they’ve tentatively scheduled a second box set of Deep Space Nine soundtracks for the third quarter of 2017, with a second Voyager box set hitting about a year from now, and what the label says will be its final Star Trek release, a 4-CD box set collecting fan-requested “leftovers” from Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise in late 2018.

Varese Sarabande has announced an April release date for the scores of all three of the original Mel Gibson Mad Max films on “sandy” vinyl, and they’re accepting pre-orders now.

Stay tuned to the Retroist Scoreboard…as new releases arrive, we’ll let you know what, and more importantly where, the score is.

When he’s not keeping score at the Retroist, Earl Green is the founder, head writer and podcaster-in-chief at theLogBook.com, a site devoted in roughly equal parts to classic sci-fi, classic video games, classic soundtracks, and space history. You can catch him lining up carefully curated excerpts from TV, movie and game scores most months on the Log Book’s soundtrack mixtape podcast, In The Grand Theme Of Things.