The Bridge - Peter J. Tomasi - Sara DuVall - Abrams Comicarts

The Bridge Is A Beautiful And Moving Graphic Novel

It shouldn’t shock a single soul that visits this site, that history is important to us. Sure, we spend most of our writing time pointing out the best in retro pop culture. However, even then we have constantly gone back and shared real moments of history. Whilst in my case it might focus more on horror films, video games, and animation. The truth is I of course am always eager to learn more about significant history. Which is exactly the case with Peter J. Tomasi and Sara DuVall’s upcoming graphic novel, The Bridge. I have not had the pleasure of reading a more entertaining as well as fascinating graphic novel in some time.

Abrams Comicarts was kind enough to send me a review copy of The Bridge. I picked it up last evening to read, and the 200 pages all but flew by. I will certainly admit I had never heard of Washington and Emily Roebling before opening the book. Nor of course, was I aware of how truly remarkable a journey Washington’s life had been. Thankfully through Peter J. Tomasi’s dream project, in addition to the beautiful artwork by Sara DuVall. You too will have the chance to find out, the type of vision and determination that was needed to see the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge. As well as the absolute toll it took on both Washington’s health and the tragic loss of life it required to bring such a marvel of engineering to fruition.
The Bridge - Brooklyn Bridge

Perhaps the greatest compliment I can pay Tomasi is he forced me to seek out more books about the Roeblings. The Bridge starts out in 1852, with a young Washington in some ways being molded by John Roebling, his Father. Or rather being forged into the type of person who could successfully bring about the Brooklyn Bridge. A project planned out by John and begun with his Son in 1869. It was however Washington who oversaw the actual construction.
The Bridge - Sara DuVall

A Civil War veteran, whose actions would be quite befitting a film itself, Washington Roebling wasn’t alone in his vision of the bridge. Emily Roebling proved what those of us who live in an “enlightened” age already know. There is not a single job or task that a Woman isn’t equally capable of performing. When her Husband’s health was threatened, it was Emily who ensured the project was on schedule. Supporting the Roeblings was a dedicated crew, men truly risking their lives to see the dream take shape. Just as, of course, Washington did himself – which is how he earned that respect.
The Bridge - Washington Roebling

With Tomasi and DuVall’s The Bridge, I have no doubt you will be just as amazed as I was. The story is both exhilarating and uplifting, a reminder of the good that can be accomplished for a noble endeavor. You can pick up a copy of the book on April 17th at better book dealers everywhere. Of course you can visit Abrams Comicarts official page to pre-order your copy today.

While you are waiting to grab your copy of The Bridge. Why not check out this clip from PBS America?

[Via] PBS America

Patrick McGoohan - Pack of Lies

1985 Patrick McGoohan Interview On The Today Show

I am pretty certain that after nearly eight years writing for the Retroist, you know I dig Patrick McGoohan. Whether that be from his work in 1960’s Danger Man, 1967’s The Prisoner, or even 1981’s Scanners. The latter is actually where I first encountered Patrick McGoohan, David Cronenberg’s film isn’t a bad introduction to the actor if I say so myself.

[Via] Movieclips

Maybe I should shout SPOILERS before you watch that clip? However it does most definitely show why McGoohan was a legendary actor. His gravitas while performing as well as his undeniable charm, all of it helped to make him a star.
Patrick McGoohan - Ice Station Zebra

Now as for the reason Patrick McGoohan was being interviewed on the Today Show? It was due to his starring in a Broadway version of Pack of Lies, at the Royale Theater. The play was written by Hugh Whitemore, which in turn was based on 1971’s Act of Betrayal . That was actually an episode of the BBC’s Play of the Month. An amazing series to say the least although practically all of the episodes have been lost to time.

The story the play presents is based on a real event that took place in 1961. When Londoners, Ruth and Bill Search, discover their good neighbors, Peter and Helen Kroger, were in fact Russian spies. In Whitemore’s Pack of Lies, the Family name is changed to Jackson. It was revealed that the Kroegers were part of the Portland Spy Ring, photographing and sending sensitive information by way of microdots.

[Via] Smithsonian Channel

In the play, McGoohan portrays an British Intelligence Officer name Stewart. Who helps to track down the Krogers and arrest them, by watching from the window of the Jackson’s teenaged daughter’s window. Gay Search, the daughter, is actually in this Today Show interview as well Patrick McGoohan!

Now that you know why Patrick McGoohan is being interviewed, enjoy this 1985 clip. Besides the interview you will also get to see just a bit of Pack of Lies as well!

[Via] Colony3

Black Museum - Radio

Retro Radio: Four Small Bottles (The Black Museum)

Welcome back, friends, to a new offering for Retro Radio Memories. This time we have an episode of the classic old time radio program, The Black Museum. A show entitled Four Small Bottles. Which originally had been aired on May 20th, 1952. As always it features Orson Welles as both host and narrator, I’m sure I do not need to say he does an incredible job?
Black Museum - Orson Welles

Like all of The Black Museum episodes, Four Small Bottles is based on real cases from Scotland Yard’s infamous collection. Also known as The Crime Museum, it is a collection for New Scotland Yard for objects from crime cases. Not open to the public, it does however function as a means to teach the Police in both the study of crime as well as criminals themselves.

It was founded of sorts in 1874 by Inspector Neame and a Constable Randall. Case files and even objects from a myriad of crimes are housed in The Black Museum. Such as the letters that are assumed to have belonged to Jack the Ripper!
Black Museum - Jack the Ripper

In Four Small Bottles , we learn the dark history of said containers. Involving the death of one Oscar Stone. The suspects in this case are Anne Stone, the Widow of Oscar, as well as a Reverend Edgar Sweet. Remember these dramatizations are based on actual cases from Scotland Yard!

Join us, friends. Turn down those lights and lean in closer to the warmth of the computer screen. Let us journey back to 1952 as we pay a visit to The Black Museum and learn the secrets of the Four Small Bottles!


Of course I would be remiss if in addition I didn’t suggest you check out the Retro Radio Memories Podcast. While I certainly do not upload a new episode every week, a brand new episode will pop up from time to time.

Subscribe To The Retro Radio Memories Podcast:
[iTunes] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in iTunes. Moreover you might leave us a nice review as well to help spread the word about the show?

Imperials Strike Back - Title

The Imperials Strike Back Is An Epic 1978 Fan Film!

Friends, the other day, Tom Berges of I Grew Up Star Wars uploaded something very, very special. Perhaps mind-blowing could be considered just hyperbole until you realize the facts. In 1977 a group of ten-year-old’s got their hands on an 8mm camera, they decided to make a sequel to Star Wars. Which is how the Imperials Strike Back came into being in 1978.
Imperials Strike Back - Luke

The children featured in The Imperials Strike Back started making this short film in 1977. It took two years for them to complete. Driven with nothing more than the absolute love of the first Star Wars. Of course as with most children, they also had a heaping dose of can-do attitude. Which is certainly evident in the special effects on display!
Imperials Strike Back - Star Destroyer

When I contacted Tom, I offered him first crack at writing this post. While I was itching to make this post myself I didn’t want to take any thunder from I Grew Up Star Wars. I feel that his site’s overall point of being, to share and celebrate the love of Star Wars is being honored with this post however.
Imperials Strike Back - Darth Vader

It has been 35 years since the makers of The Imperials Strike Back have seen the short film. In addition to that it has been digitized and even has some familiar music in place. I do not know if it was originally silent, I assume so, but subtitles have been added.
Imperials Strike Back - Han

Seriously, the heart and love on display with this nearly 22 minute fan film is breathtaking. If you are anything like me you will not only have a big smile on your face by the end of it. But maybe a few tears in your eyes as well at how much love and work was put into the short film. The force is certainly with those who were responsible for this. Obviously as it is with Tom for being so kind to let us share this now. Now be sure to visit and join the fun of I Grew Up Star Wars when you get a chance.

Enough of my gushing. Sit back and enjoy The Imperials Strike Back!

[Via] 8mm Kid Epics