1994 Best Buy Ad

This 1994 Best Buy Ad features 90s Dream Technology

I bookmark a lot of websites. So many that it can take me months or even years to re-stumble upon something I thought I needed to share. In 2015 this 1994 Best Buy Ad was posted on Imgur. I drooled over it for about an hour back then, but moved on. This week I rediscovered it and thought I would dive into this gem. So let’s travel back to the nineties and explore the best items from this October of 1994 Best Buy Ad. I am sure it is filled with all sorts of electronic treats and Halloween references.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 1

In 1994, I was still spending some of my time working at a video store. Disney Movies were a huge money-maker for us. Sales on these things were no joke and Best Buy is pushing hard on 4 Disney classics. The Return of Jafar might have the same clamshell box, but a classic it was not. That being said, it was very popular at our store. The first month we couldn’t keep it on the shelves.

That is a nice enough Packard Bell. I especially like that the monitor is included in this package. So many ads back then would mix and match monitor inclusion. It was often confusing and disappointing.

Odd, not leading with something related to Halloween.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 2

Music? Can’t say many of the CDs would have caught my attention. But if you incline your head to the right, you will see the object of my affection, the Sega Genesis.

How are they enticing people to buy systems at Best Buy in 1994? A free backpack of course! From that photo, I would say that the backpack almost looks too small. Unless you only want to pack 1 or 2 games. I guess if one of those games is Shaq-Fu, that is all you need. We really seemed to be into Shaquille O’Neil in the 90s.

Hmm, wonder why no attempts at a Halloween or horror game.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 3
Page 3 of the 1994 Best Buy Ad is the high-priced audio equipment. Everyone of these objects was out of my price range. Looking at them now, I am relieved I was cool with my sister’s hand me down equipment. That saved me a lot of money.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 4

Yes! 31 inches of TV for a mere 800 bucks. That TV with no-name looks really familiar. If I am not mistaken it was the style of TV we used in our video store. Something about the sound grill looks familiar. I am not sure if Sound Grill is a real word, but if not, I am coining it. We had those going 24/7 and never had a problem with them. So if that is the TV we had, $800 might have been a good deal.

Just want to add, it’s like Halloween is not even happening in this circular.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 5

More television, all of them showing Snow White, which was as a I mentioned was a big deal at the time. I would always peruse the TV, but what I was really interested at this point in time were those video camcorders. For reasons I can no longer recall, I really wanted an 8mm one.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 6

Stop everything! 540MB Hard Drive for only 300 dollars? I wonder what the failure rate was on the Conner Drives? Some other items of note: 14.4 modems for those weirdos who do the online and Best Buy’s lab coat wearing computer techs. Was anyone out there a Best Buy computer tech back then? Did they really provides lab coats?

I would like to go as a Best Buy Halloween Tech for Halloween this year. Did they were any special badges on their lab coats?

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 7

Look at all the computers! I would have done just about anything for any one of these machines in 1994. I would like to take this opportunity to focus on the use of free software to help sell the computer. For those who complain about your computer being filled with all sorts of nonsense when it was installed, I think this is where it got started. While some of this stuff might have been interesting to play with, for the most part it went on a shelf or in a box and was never opened. It was just noise. Bloatware you needed to install yourself.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 8

20 free pieces of Stoneware with the purchase of most of these large appliances! Wow. How can they afford to do that?

While I had very little interest in these large appliance in 1994 or now. For some weird reason I have always found the Chest Freezer to be oddly compelling. Just think of all the ice pops and ice cream sandwiches you could buy on sale and keep cold with one of them.

1994 Best Buy Ad - Page 9

They wait until the last page to post a pumpkin? Just a pumpkin?? This close to Halloween and this is all they could fit into the ad? That is disappointing. Oh well. Let’s take a look at the other stuff.

Almost $140 for a Discman! No wonder it took me nearly a decade to get one. That is not a terrible price for video tapes, but I could find them cheaper. As for the boomboxes, they lacked the style of their eighties ancestors. So I had no interest in them.

Conclusion


My family would keep circulars like these for years. It is a shame that at some point we cleaned house and threw them all away. Who knows what treasures we could be finding now. Still it is nice that someone is making an effort to share and preserve gems like this 1994 Best Buy Ad.

Pepsi License to Chill Card

Remember the Pepsi License to Chill Card?

As the 1990s rolled around, the Cola Wars continued to rage. Coke and Pepsi would lock horns time and again. One releasing a new product and the other firing right back. It was a great time for novelty in the industry. New flavors and talking cans abounded. This was also the time that rewards cards were really taking off and Pepsi launched its Pepsi License to Chill Card.

The Pepsi License to Chill Card was an incentive and discount card that you could use to claim prizes or discounts at select stores. I had one. Sadly, I never used it, but it still filled a very important role. It added heft to my wallet when it was sorely lacking.

As you can see from the image above, the card was pretty simple. Nice clean design with a distorted Pepsi logo attached to a number that made it look extra official.

What I remember most about the card was the ad campaign. I think they localized them for regions, but I clearly remember the beach theme. These ads remind us that it is a non-stop party in Pepsi town and everyone is invited. Just follow the cool music down to the beach to join the party. Oh, and if you want to get in, don’t forget to bring your Pepsi License to Chill Card. Membership has its privileges.

The card you see above was recently posted on Imgur. I am not sure what happened to my original Pepsi License to Chill Card. I would like to say that I lost it at some epic beach party, but sadly that is not the case. More than likely it wound up in a junk drawer in our kitchen and it went in the trash during a routine cleaning. Sadly, never to Chill again.

Watch the Pepsi License to Chill Card Commercial

1965 Hudson City Savings Bank Envelope

Well, I finally got the ol’ scanner working again and I have decided to jump into my many boxes of ephemera. My first handful that I scooped out are largely related to Northern New Jersey, but I think that many of you will get a kick out of the material even if you do not recognize the material from first hand experience.

This is an envelope that is from 1965, which you can see from the postmark (5 cents…what a bargain). It is for a bank that still exists today, “Hudson City Savings Bank”. While the bank might still be around, I am pretty sure they do not have envelopes this cool anymore. I especially like the pattern on the inside of the envelope. It is all very classy.

1965-hudson-city-savings-envelope-01

1965-hudson-city-savings-envelope-02

How much did a blank Video Tape cost in 1984?

The answer would vary widely depending on the quality, but they were pretty pricey, especially if you were a kid. Above is a coupon from Pay ‘n Save from 1984 that will save you a dollar on Ampex tapes. Which brings the price down to $5.99.

Ampex, as a company, has a pretty storied history riddled with technology leading moments, but I never had much luck with their video tapes. Still for $5.99, if I had the money, I would have picked one up.

The First Used Video Games

This ad appearing in the November 1983 issue of Electronic Games magazine represents one of the early forays into the used cartridge business. At the time, I would have been excited to get 15 cartridges for $79.95 but unenthusiastic that they got to choose them. Although it doesn’t say it specifically, I’m guess that the Christmas Special was for Atari 2600 cartridges. I wonder how many used cartridges that you’d have to buy in order for that $30 membership entitling you to a 10% discount to really pay off?

Walt Disney Studios Christmas Card

Walt Disney Studios Christmas Card

Inspired by a fellow retro fan, I went and bought Christmas Cards to send to people this weekend. I waded through boxes of cards until I finally found ones I thought were decent. Then this morning I go and visit Hake’s and right there, on the front page, is a the most perfect card in the world. A very rare Walt Disney Studios Christmas Card from 1932. Now why doesn’t Disney reprint this design? It would be an instant holiday classic. Oh well, I guess if they did it would not be as rare and wonderful.

About the Card


Sadly this Walt Disney Studios Christmas Card is no longer available. This is just the third Christmas card issued by the Studio. The first being issued in 1930. It is a 4.75×8.75” mailer card on textured paper opens to 8.75×11.5”. As folded/mailed, the front has a postmark and inked address of “Colonial Theater Allentown, Pa.” The opposite side as folded has an attached 1.75” tall Mickey Mouse Christmas sticker depicting him with a tree. This is by Hall Bros. and used to keep the card sealed. It has moderate scattered wear from opening of card including tip off one shoe.

Card interior has choice 4×8” tipped-in paper sheet. With a scene of a horse-drawn carriage containing Mickey, Minnie Mouse, Pluto, Horace and Clarabelle. Top has a die-cut tab with a Christmas tree design and the bottom flap has an imprint reading “Walt Disney And Mickey Mouse Present Their Silly Symphony/Season’s Greetings.” Outside of card has scattered trace of dust soiling/aging, but the interior of the card remains clean. Card itself was Fine/VF while tipped in sheet is N. Mint. Only 3 times in Hake’s 42 years were they able to offer the 1932 card and this is the actual example shown in The Official Price Guide To Disney Collectibles by Ted Hake and comes w/COA.

I wish I had been the one who bought it.