transformers

Transformers were poised to make coleslaw out of the Cabbage Patch Kids for Christmas 1984

In Christmas of 1984 the toy world was shifting. Video games were hitting a rough spot and action figure toys were already years old. Even the heavy hitter of the year before, the Cabbage Patch Kid was not looking to repeat what it did the year before. No, according to just about everyone, the hot toys for Christmas of 1984 were going to be robots. Which robots in particular? The Transformers, of course.

In this report from the CBC from that year, they discuss not just the Transformers, but other great robot toys including site favorite Tomy VERBOT. As well as non-robot toys like Rainbow Brite and He-Man.

Read Verbot the Voice Activated Robot

The toy footage is pretty amazing. They even include a short loop of the original Transformers in front of this techy background at 3:15. However that is just a small piece of this nearly eight minute video. They also discuss people against war toys. Some great interviews with precocious kids including one who wants a pair of glasses that will not get foggy for Christmas.

Watching this now, I chuckle, but I think these type of news shows sent waves of fear through my Mother. What was going to be the hot toy? Was I even aware of it? Could she get her hands on it? These were all the things that stuff like this report would raise. She usually ignored things like the section about War Toys, but that sort of talk was dangerous. It almost got my DnD books taken away because of the negative press around that game.

I think I was still very much into GI Joe in 1984 as were my friends. It would be at least a few months before a Transformer would appear in my circle of playmates. So I am glad my Mom was not on top of this trend. Although, I got to admit, I really would have loved a Verbot.

Watch this report from Christmas of 1984 about the Transformers

Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You're A Lovely Guy)

Max Headroom sings Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You’re A Lovely Guy)

Some songs get released and are quickly forgotten. That is a shame when that song SHOULD become a holiday classic. In 1986, the song by Max Headroom, Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You’re A Lovely Guy) was released and unfortunately did not take the world by storm. Why you ask?

Let’s assume it isn’t because of the quality. I admit, that is a bit questionable. So if it is not that, maybe it was too late? Max made his splash in 1984 and really peaked in popularity from 1985 to early 1986. So while I am sure this song was recorded earlier in 1986, by the Winter momentum had petered out. It was released as a single on Chrysalis records with the B side, Gimme Shades. Which was more of a country-esque song. While both songs can be found on the single, only Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You’re A Lovely Guy) has been posted online in a decent video and recorded form.

Gimme Shades and other songs have been posted online, but only as rips from the Max Headroom Christmas Show.

Now the song might not be a holiday classic, but it is a great sometimes forgotten piece of the 1980s. And this video? Well this video, just like most things starring ol’ Max is just plain magical. There is something extra compelling about seeing Max try to fit into a holiday template. It is almost a little jarring and grating, but it makes for an excellent take-off on holiday specials and their music. Not everyone was meant to sing a holiday classic and Max brings that home as he plays with all the holiday special tropes. Enjoy.

Watch Max Headroom sing Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You’re A Lovely Guy)

Christmas Funk: Earth, Wind, Fire, Holiday

Holiday as one of the elements? Yes please!

I’m all for starting new traditions, especially when they tap my nostalgia bone. Which is near the funny bone. And when those traditions center around Christmas, well, even better. So this year, I’m bringing in the funk!

Last year, in my post-concert excitement (that apparently is supposed to last way past the actual concert date), I rushed to snatch up anything I could find that featured Chicago. And in that flurry, I found alot more songs than I already knew, I bought two concert movies, and even discovered Chicago’s Christmas album. Also in that flurry? I overlooked finding something Earth, Wind, and Fire.

Another one of those “the author took this picture” bragging moments.

Last week, amid the bustle getting ready to start my workday, I just randomly decided to look up Earth, Wind, and Fire and Christmas in the same search. No lie, I entered “Earth Wind Fire Christmas,” and I wasn’t disappointed. Not by a long shot.

Have you ever wanted a Christmas album that sounded remarkably like the 1970s, despite being released in 2014? Then Holiday is your album. Oh my goodness, is it ever!

Source: Wikipedia (By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47040032

Holiday is the twenty-first album (only Chicago had more albums under their belt before they released their Christmas album) for Earth, Wind, and Fire, and was released on October 21, 2014 (seriously!). It is also notable as it is the final album to feature co-founder Maurice White before his death in February 2016.

The album consists of eleven traditional songs of Christmas, and two re-worked Earth Wind and Fire songs from the 1970s – “Happy Seasons” (originally “Happy Feelin'” from 1975’s That’s The Way of the World) and “December” (you better know which song this was inspired by!). If you’ve ever wanted to hear Christmas with funk, you’re not going to be disappointed (I wasn’t at the initial discovery, and I wasn’t once I listened).

Uploaded by That Mimosa Grove

And for some reason, the final song on the album was cut off completely. And I’d be remiss if I forgot it!

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And if you’re really itching to hear more blaring trumpets for Christmas, I covered Chicago’s Christmas album not all that long ago.

A funky Christmas? Some traditions are meant to be funk-ified!

Allison stopped grooving long enough to write this part of the article. If you like what you’ve read here, she has Christmas-ified her blog, Allison’s Written Words. You can follow her blog year ’round on Facebook, and her on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut.

Back to grooving!

 

All-4-One…and All 4 Christmas!

It’s the most obvious time of the year to be into Christmas music. And as I said in my previous article about Chicago’s Christmas albums, I like my staples, but I also like some unconventional Christmas music. Hence, the Chicago Christmas album…and All-4-One’s 1994 effort.

All-4-One. You remember them, right? They came after Boyz II Men, were based in the Los Angeles area (unlike Boyz II Men, who were based in Philadelphia, PA), and had a smooth R&B sound. Ranging in age from 20 to 24 at the beginning of their fame, they were beautiful, soulful, and they even had that one guy with the really deep voice. Now, I’ll confess, playing any music by this group will make me scream like it is the mid-1990s, I’m fourteen years old, and I’m popping their CDs into my Sony Discman.

And I may or may not have screamed the same way over watching All-4-One perform on one of the David Foster concerts.

Uploaded by All-4-One (Official Channel)

Ok, I definitely screamed like someone who would throw their panties (but that didn’t happen!). Why would anyone…

I’m sure it has happened, folks. No, I’ve never done that!

All-4-One, consisting of members Jamie Jones, Delious Kennedy, Alfred Nevarez, and Tony Borowiak – all of whom are still a quartet today – released their first album in 1994, a self-titled effort. So naturally, when you have a hit album, a Christmas album is probably circling nearby.

Case in point:

OMG, yes. This. This album. This album spent the whole month of December in my Discman. I didn’t own any “traditional” Christmas albums in 1996…I owned this. I played the heck out of this CD for at least three years. It also has the distinction of being one of my first CDs in addition to being the first Christmas album I ever owned.

All-4-One puts the soulful spin on the traditional Christmas songs, giving them a 1990s R&B sound. If you think all R&B music sounds the same, you’re not fooling anyone. 1990s R&B had a sound all of its own, and while these guys were probably pegged as riding Boyz II Men’s coattails, they knew how to stand out the right way.

I’d love for you to bask in the warm glow of 90s R&B, with an album that was truly All 4 Christmas.

You see what I did there?!

Oh fine, just click play.

Admit it, your Discman/Walkman-toting ’90s childhood came screaming back just a little, didn’t it?

So, I ask you fine readers: What was your first Christmas album back in the day? I’d love to hear from you!

You can contact me on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut to tell me what your first Christmas album was!

Allison was a Walkman/Discman-toting ’90s child, and she’s proud to admit it. She didn’t buy her next Christmas album until the year she graduated high school, but this was her first, and she’ll always treasure it…even if she can’t find her copy and had to listen to it on You Tube (thank goodness for You Tube!). If you like what you’ve seen/heard here, she’s got a whole blog of Christmas craziness (until December 25th, of course, then it just becomes craziness as usual!), over at Allison’s Written Words. You can follow her blog on Facebook, and her on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut.

She really would love to know what your first Christmas album was!

Christmas Oddities: A Visit to Santa

It’s early in December, but surely you’re getting pumped for the coming holiday and Santa’s arrival, aren’t you?

Well…?

Last week, I went to a one-night only showing of a double feature of two previous RiffTrax Live specials – 2013’s Santa Conquers the Martians, and the 2009 show Christmas Shorts-stravaganza. Both shows tripped on the bizarre nature of what Christmas looks like when viewed through an askew lens, but there was this one particular short that just absolutely tripped to the point where that lens was not only askew, but also covered in filters that can’t even make this short look halfway presentable. It screams public access (but it isn’t), low budget (which is clearly is), and contains the worst use of organ music ever.

I’m referring to A Visit to Santa!

Santa

This 1963 (Really? It isn’t older than that?!) short film was shot in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by Clem Williams Films. According to IMDb, this was their only short film. And with production values such as these, it is easy to see why they didn’t make anything else.

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This horribly acted (and difficult to understand) short film is about two kids, Dick and Ann, who write a letter to Santa asking if they could visit the North Pole.

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Based on how these kids speak, I find it hard to believe that these kids wrote this.

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Because Santa is all of us, this is where he lives.

Santa, from his home at the “North Pole” (which looks like an ugly living room), obliges. He sends one of his minidress-clad elves to claim the two children.

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What happens next sounds more like a hostage situation than a Christmas dream come true.

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If you ever want to see your parents again, you’ll come with me and learn all about parades and weird toy shops.

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There is no way that living room is inside this “castle.”

I could tell you all about the joys of disturbing elf wear, kids taken in the night from their safe bedroom to go meet some guy claiming to be Santa, and the jolly old fat man sitting in some living room somewhere, as well as footage of parades, fireworks, fake crash landings, and overuse of narration, but I’d rather you guys witness it all yourselves.

Uploaded by ChristmasToonFuntime

Unfortunately, this is only the unriffed version. If you’d like to see the riffed version (done by the guys from Mystery Science Theater 3000 and RiffTrax – Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy, and Bill Corbett), there is the version as shown during the Christmas Shorts-stravaganza, and there is also a studio version, but it is the same riffing as the version done in the live show. If you enjoy RiffTrax, consider making one or both of these a part of your collection. They’re a small business and every little bit helps, especially when they put on fantastic live shows such as the one audiences were lucky to see last week. Every penny is worth it!

And I’m not above admitting that I snorted during this short.

Allison is a lover of bad films (especially educational shorts) and funny people who riff them mercilessly. If you like what Allison has to say, check out her blog (you know the name), and follow it on Facebook for some randomness on your newsfeed. She’s also on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut. 

Now, get dressed and hurry up! Don’t keep Allison waiting!

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