Archie Meets Batman '66 - Title

Get Ready For Archie Meets Batman ’66!

That’s right! Archie Andrews, that nice guy from that quaint town of Riverdale is going to meet Batman! But not just any Batman, the Batman made famous by actor Adam West. I was able to get a hold of comic book artist Dan Parent who, along with J. Bone, worked on the cover for the first issue in this series.
Archie Meets Batman '66 - Dan Parent - J. Bone

There will be 6 issues in all and if you’re wondering, it will take place in 1966. I asked Dan all the usual ridiculous questions like… “Is time travel involved?” and “is this a dream sequence?” While he was mum on details, he said that it takes place in both Gotham and Riverdale in 1966. This is a joint publishing project between Archie Comics and DC. This isn’t the first time these two companies have worked together. As I recall, there was Tiny Titians/Little Archie and His Pals (like Teen Titans). Anyway, the first issue of Archie meets Batman ’66 comes out in July.

Archie Meets Batman '66 - Francesco Francavilla

(It should be noted there will be many variant covers. Including this one by Francesco Francavilla! – Vic)

If you’re interested in Dan Parent’s other work, he currently has a Kickstarter campaign for his comic book series DIE KITTY DIE which he does with fellow artist & writer Fernando Ruiz. This comic book follows the life of a witch, Kitty Ravencraft, who exist both in comic books and the real world (inside the comic)… As you can guess from the title – people, monsters and things are constantly trying to kill her. It’s basically horror – comedy at it’s finest with plenty of references to pop culture of today and yesteryear. Lots of nostalgia! I recommend you take a look.
Archie Meets Batman '66 - Die Kitty Die

While you are waiting for Archie Meets Batman ’66, check out another post featuring the classic TV version of the Caped Crusader!



For example, the reveal of the Batman ’66 ReAction figures from Funko!

California Typewriter - Title

California Typewriter The Documentary

I was browsing the documentary section of Hulu the other day and a title caught my eye: California Typewriter. The word “typewriter” brought back memories of my mother using her typewriter for medical transcription at both a doctor’s office and home. I remember her using an IBM Selectric and then a daisy wheel. She was using a typewriter up until the early 2000s. This isn’t to say she wasn’t using a word processor or a word processing program on Windows 3.1 as well, but the typewriter was still used.

Back to the documentary.

California Typewriter is named after a business in Berkeley, CA. As you can imagine, the business struggles to keep their doors open these days. This documentary looks into the day to day activities of the employees as well as looking into the patrons of this business. Folks bring in typewriters for repair and maintenance, others come in to buy.
California Typewriter - Maintenance

The documentary also shows us some famous collectors like Tom Hanks as well as typewriter advocates singer John Mayer and actor Sam Shepard. They explain why they choose to still use these mechanical devices and steer clear of computers for their writing.

Most of the typewriters featured California Typewriter are non-electric. We even get to see some of the earliest typewriters from the 1800s. Some didn’t even have a qwerty keyboard.

[Via] Zero Media

As someone who collects vintage computers, I appreciate their love of these devices even though some of the people on camera put down computers (it hurt a little). However, computers had their say at the end of the film. Halfway through the documentary, I was regretting giving my ex-girlfriend not one, but two mechanical typewriters (she’s a writer). The commentary in this film has convinced me that I need to type letters, ideas, and basically anything that needs to be on paper with a typewriter.

I have a spot for it in my home office. I just need to visualize…
California Typewriter - Justin's desk

Coleco ADAM - Title Card

The NEW Coleco ADAM Video Podcast

Three and a half years ago, I made my first Retroist Video Podcast and it was on a subject I care very much about: The Coleco ADAM Computer. That particular computer was the first I have ever owned and like many firsts, I have fond memories of the device. The original Retroist audio podcast was published in 2011 and like all of the other episodes, it is very informative. If you have never heard of Coleco’s computer or you don’t know much about it, I would recommend you give it a listen. However, if audio isn’t your thing, then keep reading.
Coleco ADAM - Coleco ADAM setup

A few years back, the Retroist asked if I was interested in making video podcasts of the show and well, obviously I said yes. My original idea was to give the video podcasts a dated look so I went with the 4:3 aspect ratio. This would be great if you were watching these on an old CRT television set. Over time I realized I could take advantage of the increased screen real estate of modern televisions & monitors with a 16:9 aspect ratio. At some point (the A Christmas Story podcast may have been the first) I started making the video podcasts with the modern aspect ratio. Looking back at the video podcasts I have produced, it bothered me that the podcast I wanted to convert most was stuck in 4:3. Not anymore. I present the NEW Coleco ADAM Video Podcast in 16:9 and though the trend is 4K, I went with 1080. Hopefully I don’t regret that in a few years… With the exception of the commercials, I didn’t use much of the visuals from the original video podcast. Just about everything you see in this video podcast is new.

If you want to see the other Retroist Video Podcasts, click here.

Pathmark

No Frills Products Of Pathmark

When I was a kid in the 1980s, my parents would go to the supermarket once a month on Saturday mornings. Having been a regular viewer of Saturday morning cartoons, this would upset me as I had to go with them and miss out on all those shows. The supermarket? Pathmark.

[Via] Gray Flannel Videos

While there, I would spend most of my time in the toy aisle. The toys were cheap and… limited, but it was something for me to look at. However, there was one aisle I didn’t mind going down, because of how odd it looked. From front of the aisle to the rear, all I could see were white labels on soda cans, apple sauce, pet food, etc.. This was the no frills aisle. I remember this fondly as this was the go to place to get everything we needed for vacations. The no frills soda cans were a staple in the cooler for those trips. I can’t remember how the cola tasted, but I do remember how the can looked. It was like watching a Looney Tunes cartoon, but instead of Acme products, it was no frills.

Looking for baking soda, don’t look for Arm & Hammer, get BAKING SODA. Looking for cola soda, don’t look for Pepsi, get COLA. Same goes for BEER and CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP. Something about the uniformity of this aisle made me smile. Do you remember Pathmark’s No Frills products? Did you have a similar experience?
Pathmark - Beer