Thunder Road

1986’s Thunder Road Was Inspired By The Road Warrior!

I feel I should clarify how Thunder Road wasn’t exactly inspired by 1981’s The Road Warrior. In all honesty I should say Thunder Road totally copied elements from Mad Max creator, George Miller’s epic post-apocalyptic film!

[Via] Warner Bros.

Now before I jump into Thunder Road proper. This is the point where I remind you that in my youth my father didn’t exactly curb what movies we were watching because of ratings. In 1981 for example some parents might have certainly questioned taking a nine-year-old with them to The Road Warriorr. My Father of course was a single parent and when a film came along he wished to see he would take me. As long as he thought I could handle the subject matter that is.

Having said that I can also add that the young man at the box office gave us a questioning look when we bought our tickets.
Thunder Road

Anyway, a mere five years after The Road Warrior blew audiences away. Milton Bradley delivered Thunder Road! These following images as well as information about the game comes courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

Instead of Max Rockatansky’s last of the V8 Interceptors. Players in Milton Bradley’s board game use the Avenger.

Thunder Road

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.


Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

Furthermore, players in Thunder Road have two additional road vehicles. The Eliminator is of course inspired by Pappagallo’s “Lone Wolf” custom built vehicle from the 1981 film.

Thunder Road

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.


Thunder Road
Thunder Road

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

The last road vehicle, The Doom Buggy, is naturally based off some of the marauder dune buggies from The Road Warrior.

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.



Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

Players have one other vehicle they can count on during the game. That would be the Thunder Chopper, which appears to be their answer to the Gyro Captain.

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.


Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

So you might be wondering how Thunder Road plays out, right? Each player selects their colored vehicles and then attempts to accomplish one of two things. Destroy every vehicle of your opposing players by shooting or ramming into them. Or on the other hand you can simply try to outdistance them, leave them behind you.

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

It is important to realize that there are two game boards that connect to make up the highway. The first car to reach the end of the second board then takes the first piece and puts it in front. Woe be to those vehicles of course that were on the flipped first board. As they are now completely out of the game!

[Via] Spaced Cobra TV

Now here is the part where I sadly have to tell you some bad news. While the game is available out there on Ebay…the prices are nuts. Ranging anywhere from $60 dollars for an incomplete edition to $250 for a complete version.

Thanks to BoardGameGeek it appears that there has been quite a following built up around this 1986 board game. And I highly suggest you follow the link to check how players have modded the game and pieces to fit in with the Mad Max universe.

Image courtesy of BoardGameGeek.

In that Mad Max: Fury Road inspired game of Thunder Road…I believe I can make out Coma the Doof Warrior!


“Leading us into battle was Coma The Doof Warrior. Blind since birth. Coma wore a mask made from the dried skin of his murdered mother’s screaming face. His fire breathing weapon played the music of mayhem, It whipped us into a bloody battle rage”

VicSage

Editor at Retroist
Searching through the alleys for useful knowledge in the city of Nostalgia. Huge cinema fanatic and sometimes carrier of the flame for the weirding ways of 80s gaming, toys, and television. When his wife lets him he is quite happy sitting in the corner eating buckets of beef jerky.

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2 thoughts on “1986’s Thunder Road Was Inspired By The Road Warrior!

  1. Lance says:

    I loved this game and snagged it when it first was available. We played it a few times and it still sits in my closet next to my Electronic Dungeons & Dragons, Dark Tower and Dragon Master games.

    I’m going to have to disagree with you on a point. The Eliminator shows a lot more influence from the Humongous’ car than Pappagallo’s. Humongous’ has 6 wheels, spoiler at the back, a platform ram at the front and the two tanks at the back could easily be mistaken/changed toa rocket like exhaust. Plus the overall silhouette matches up way better.

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