Saturn V

1,969 Bricks For Mankind: Lego’s Saturn V Goes To The Moon!

Did I hear someone yell “Spaceship!”? Just in time for the 48th anniversary of the first moon landing, Lego is rolling out a massive set that originated from their fan submission portal, and it’s going to be one giant leap for casual Lego architects.
Saturn V

The set, weighing in at $119.99, has – appropriately enough – 1,969 pieces which add up to an over three-foot-tall faithful model of Werner von Braun’s mighty Saturn V rocket, the giant booster that sent astronauts to the moon.
Saturn V

But this huge Lego rocket isn’t just accurate on the outside.

The rocket can actually “stage” – meaning it comes apart where the real one did when the fuel in one section was completely spent, exposing an “engine” that would send the rest of the rocket on its way. The Saturn V rocket was a three-stage rocket, as is its impressive Lego counterpart.

The third stage “petals” open – again, accurate to the real thing – to expose the lunar module, allowing Lego astronauts in their Apollo command & service module to turn around, dock with the lunar module, and pull it free of the rest of the rocket.

And oh yes, did I mention Lego astronauts? There are Lego astronauts, but they’re tiny compared to the usual minifigures. (A Saturn V scaled to typical Lego minifigures would be…a lot taller than three feet.)

The Lego lunar lander can indeed land, and the command module can separate from the service module for “splashdown”, complete with flotation balloons. Basically, budding mission managers can replicate every phase of an Apollo mission to the moon with this gigantic set.

If you’re anything like me and have a soft spot for the early days of the American space program and its bold strides into the future, you’ll be waiting for this set to hit stores on June 1st. With the number of pieces and the size of the model involved, it’s not for the faint of heart…

…but then, going to the moon never was.

[Via] GigaScience

Earl Green

Podcaster-in-Chief at theLogBook.com
As the writer of the Retroist’s weekly Scoreboard column, Earl Green is keeping score on soundtrack releases old and new, a topic he’s written and podcasted about extensively at his own site, theLogBook.com.He’s also written entire books about Doctor Who (VWORP!1 and VWORP!2), Star Trek (WARP!1), and growing up geeky, and hosts theLogBook.com’s Escape Pod, Select Game and Don’t Give This Tape To Earl podcasts.He is large, he contains multitudes.

Subscribe to the Retroist Newsletter

* indicates required