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These Turtles Have Power!

In adulthood, I admire my parents for the work ethic and guidance they’ve given me to succeed in life.

I also admire them for taking us to see kiddie movies when we were little.

Willingly.

I was in Target with my mom a few weeks ago on one of our weekly grocery shopping trips, and we saw a display for the new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie. She saw the display and said to me, “those aren’t the real Ninja Turtles.”

To her, these are the real Ninja Turtles:

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I should be surprised about this, but she’s the same woman who watched Pee Wee’s Playhouse with me and my brother a few years before this movie came out.

Let’s just say this is a wonderful bonding experience. Because to me, these creations of foam rubber latex and moving mouths (and not CGI) are the real Ninja Turtles. And it’s because they are just that…real. Ok, not real turtles, but there are real people in those suits. And a real person (and his really awesome team of people) created those suits. Real people made them work. And it resulted in the ninth highest-grossing film of 1990.

Now, I won’t dispute the fact that times have changed, and this type of ahead-of-its-time design for a film is antiquated in the eyes of younger audiences today. But in 1990, this was the real deal. And we ate it up. My brother and I (blame him!) were Ninja Turtles fans – we watched the cartoon, we played with the toys (yes, I played with the toys), and my favorite Turtle was Michelangelo. Was then, is now. I’m not above admitting it.

I’m also not above admitting that I ordered his Funko Pop (the TV version) from Amazon today.

So naturally, when there was a movie to be seen, my brother and I had to see it. So our parents took us.

And like the cartoon and merchandise before it, we ate it up. We loved it. I know my mom did. We’ll assume my dad liked it too.

And we got this for our 8th birthday in 1990 (we’re twins).

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That is, in fact, my original Family Home Entertainment VHS copy. It has been in my movie collection since 1990, and while it has been relegated to my basement, and other childhood movies have come and gone in the years since this was gifted to us, this one stayed. I’m pretty sure my mom would never have allowed this to become the horrible victim of hand-me-downs and donation bins.

I was down in my basement pulling laundry out of the dryer, and grabbed it off a shelf (after having to move a few other videos). I cleaned the dust off the box and video, and despite its age, the box only looks to be loved gently. I know we watched this video frequently while we were growing up, but it is surprisingly in good condition for a 26-year-old videocassette.

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I particularly love the critical praise printed on the box:

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Ahhh, Joel Seigel and your wit.Good Morning America hasn’t been the same without your trustworthy movie reviews.

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I also love the videocassette label. It reminds me of the Family Home Entertainment releases of the cartoon. I did have one of those tapes back when, but that became one of those unfortunate hand-me-down souls.

And with all this, the true test will be how well the videocassette has aged, and if it still works. I do have a working VCR in my room (and a backup in the living room), so I’m not above testing it out. My basement and house are temperate and dry (as was my childhood home), so conditions are favorable that this VHS will work well, even if it looks its age, quality-wise.

I’m inclined to agree with my mom – these are the real Ninja Turtles, and this was their very real movie.

For real.

I’ll follow this up with a video test, promise!

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Allison really does love this movie. And you may just love her blog, Allison’s Written Words, too. You can also follow her blog on Facebook, and give her a shout out on Twitter @AllisonGeeksOut. She’ll eat up your comments and compliments too!

No lie, Michelangelo really is her favorite Ninja Turtle.

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Just don’t tell Raphael.

 

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