Meissen Porcelain Monkey Band

Check Out This 1765 Porcelain Meissen Monkey Band!

While this post might be better suited for a Monkey Monday my excitement over stumbling upon these very pricey collectibles meant I just couldn’t wait! That beautiful image of what certainly appears to be a chimp conductor is one piece from a set on display in this video from the Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago

Meissen Porcelain Monkey Band 2

Some of these pieces are apparently available on the likes of ebay with a singular figurine fetching up to $3,000 a piece and one seller offering a 21 piece set for a staggering $32,000.

Meissen Porcelain Monkey Band 3

The Meissen Porcelain Manufactory appears to be manufacturing this band even today, which might be good news for all of us simian collectors but those are the figurines fetching $2,000 to $3,000. The Rhode Island School of Design Museum page goes into great detail, such as these were primarily designed for a French audience and that this style of Monkeys engaging in human activity and wearing human clothing was called singeries.

The RISD Museum even went so far as to point out that the sheet music used on a figurines stand was not only playable but was Johann Adolph Hasse’s Lucio Papirio Dittatore, and if you hop on over to their page you can listen to a short SoundCloud clip.

Now in all honesty I’m a sucker for most anything related to primates…the fact that these happen to be having a joyous time making music…well, they just call to me. Granted I haven’t hit the lottery yet the last time I checked so any hope of adding these porcelain beauties to a curio cabinet in my home are nonexistent.

Meissen Porcelain Monkey Band 4

I can however take comfort in that I am able to watch Lancelot Link and the Evolution Revolution for free!

[Via] Lancelot Link 1970

All though to be 100% honest with you…my desire for these historic figurines is such that I feel like I should possibly take a road trip and visit that Needful Things curio shop at the edge of town…what could be the harm in looking, right?

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