Star Wars

Audience Audio Recording From 1977 Star Wars Viewing Will Make Your Day!

In my youth when attending a movie at the 62 Drive-In I would often bring along my portable tape recorder, granted this was long before the VHS player arrived on the scene, so it was really my only chance to “watch” the film later. Buck Rogers, The Empire Strikes Back, and the Fog. Sadly none of my recordings survived, they were readily taped over for all manner of reasons as I grew older and now I very much wish I could have saved at least one of them.

William Forsche uploaded on his YouTube channel bits and pieces of his theater going experience on his own tape recorder for his second viewing of Star Wars back in 1977. It is hands down magical stuff. The audience reaction is great and just might make you tear up a little from the memories of seeing it yourself back in the day.

[Via] William Forsche

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4 thoughts on “Audience Audio Recording From 1977 Star Wars Viewing Will Make Your Day!

  1. Badwolf says:

    Yup – weeping. To this day, the hair on the back of neck stands up when I see The Logo retreat after the opening sentence fragment, “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away….”

    Kids today just don’t get it. CGI is the norm, and incredible special effects are common. Back in 1977, Star Wars was an absolute game changer. It blew the doors off everything else to date. It was a revolution.

  2. I too get that sensation when watching the crawl, Badwolf. I’m very glad that Williams was able to transport this to digital media, I’ve listened to it a few times now. :)

  3. Atari Adventure Square says:

    This recording is pure magic-in-a-bottle.

    Yeah, the Star Wars theater experience was a unique moment that pretty much changed everything, to my 10 year-old eyes.

    I found it strange that the world of adults didn’t seem to catch on the same way I did. Well, in print anyway.
    That evening at the cinema, the audience (lots of adults present) let themselves be carried by the wave of excitement that built up during the course of those two wonderful hours.

    Still recall how the mere sight of Solo’s casual, smarmy look he gave the heroes in his first moment onscreen caused a ripple of laughter (and quiet excited giggles from the ladies).

    Nearly all the droids exchanges made people laugh (with a few amused what-the-hecks at R2’s indecipherable but clearly emotive beeps).

    “No reward is worth this” earned a surprisingly loud wave of laughter and applause, which made me realize everyone was having increasingly as much fun as I was. Made the evening, in a way.
    Following these three live actors (not wearing masks) in their adventure became essential, in a way, and the world outside had ceased to exist (well it had from the opening scrawl).

    Of course, the Falcon’s arrival in the heat of battle was met with a nuclear cheer, which outmatched the Death’s Star explosion, actually.
    It was tremendously satisfying. Which part? All of it.

    And like Badwolf points out, special effect for this kind of cinematic journey had not been witnessed in such way, and the effort, skill and devotion to the final product showed up, big time, as a loving note to young and longtime movie fans.

    Star Wars existed in its own universe and welcomed us into it. Both as a movie, and as a concept that extended into toys for us sandbox dwellers, in books for older fans, and in storytelling possibilites, which are still being explored to this day.

    I wish I could’ve recorded my moviewatching experience back then.
    So very glad William brings us this audio treasure from the past.

    Thank you so much for this!

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