The PointMaster Competition Joystick

I was always pretty happy with the standard joystick on the Atari 2600 and probably would not have experimented with alternative sticks if it wasn’t for a left-handed friend who struggled with the standard Atari stick and received a few top buttons sticks from various family members. The button placement never worked for me, but I did like the action on these longer sticks and I thought the grip was less blistering than the standard Atari rubber.

You can still pick up PointMasters relatively cheaply, about 10 bucks, and if you have an Intellivision, you can get their Quik Stik version.

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5 thoughts on “The PointMaster Competition Joystick

  1. These were fantastic joysticks for their time. I think atarisales.com still sells them brand new for under ten bucks. I prefer to keep my Atari stuff all stock first-party stuff new in the box, but the PointMaster did a great job. Worth trying if you’re a serious Atarian ;-)

  2. Atari Adventure Square says:

    I was also a Wico joystick owner (balltop).
    I woudn’t go spreading malicious rumors about fellow joysticks *but*…
    …I knew someone who had a bad experience with one of these third-party controllers, which broke too soon after purchase.
    Of course, in my old age as an overgrown manchild, I barely recall the make or who had it (prob not Pointmaster, but it was a bat controller) but do recall it made me stick to Wico and, as long as they lasted, the original Atari ones.

    Great artwork on that ad, btw.
    Makes me wanna start gaming this very mome…
    (drops keyboard)
    (picks up Wico)
    (woots loudly)

  3. ddsw says:

    Atari Adventure Square – I, too, had problems with my joysticks breaking, even the Wicos. The nice thing about those third-party sticks though is that when they broke, it was usually a matter of the metal contacts in the base no longer connecting. All you had to do was unscrew the base, wedge some folded-up paper behind the contact and you were good to go again. Not so with the stock Atari 2600 sticks.

  4. Atari Adventure Square says:

    Thanks for the tip, ddsw.
    Good to know as these old models are quite useful (and essential) for retro gaming goodness.

    And I just remembered who the poor sap was with the faulty joystick – it was me!
    It was an aviator-grip joystick from some lower-tier copycatters and lasted less than two weeks.

    Needless to say, that was before the Wico.

    But in defense of my own poor memory, we all had faulty controllers at some point.
    That tradition has never changed, even in this generation of high-tech consoles.

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