Network Production Music : Finally, A Production Music Library That Sounds Good.

Some of you know, I have a fondness for library music. That is a vast listing of already produced music that covers several genres and is available to license for your film, television or new media production. Working as an editor, I have access to most of the major music libraries in the business and I like to listen. However, my father (who also worked in television as well as radio) had all sorts of production albums from his days as a commercial producer and I vividly recall digging through his albums and hearing all the wonderful music. I guess that’s where this passion for library music started.

Last week, while shopping Amoeba in Hollywood, I found this guy for 3 bucks. It’s a demo album for Network, a music library based out of San Diego. I remember finding some of their LPs back in film school, so when this one appeared, I snatched it up. The demo discs are considerably more rare than the actual full albums mostly because they would have been discarded by the prospective clients.

Cooly narrated, the one sided LP gives the listener a nice sampling of the hottest tracks along with explanation of the different licensing options. I was excited to find I instantly recognized one of the tracks at around 2:50. Back in the 80s, it was used for the daily WFLD broadcast of the Illinois Lottery picks and any Chicagoan worth their Italian Beef will know it. Our pals at www.fuzzymemories.tv were able to ID the track – it’s called Power Generator and you can purchase it on Amazon! There are a few other tracks that had a distant familiar feeling, but couldn’t place them.

Listen for yourself and let me know what you think!

Patrick J. Doody

Patrick J. Doody is a horror nerd and Mexican Pepsi enthusiast living in Los Angeles. Along with his writing and producing partner Chris Valenziano, he has been involved in such terrorific projects as Silent Hill: Homecoming for Konami, Scream Awards for Spike TV and Ghostfacers: The Web Series for Warner Brothers. Their film Beneath, starring Jeff Fahey, won Best Picture at Screamfest and is currently available on Netflix.

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4 thoughts on “Network Production Music : Finally, A Production Music Library That Sounds Good.

  1. I used this production library on vinyl at a radio station I worked for in the late 80s. It had a big notebook with all the cuts indexed. Sales reps would write their clients names on cuts in the index so we would know what we could and could not use for new commercials.

  2. Plcary, that’s cool! My only experience with Network was in film school at University of Miami in the 90s. Some film company had shut down and donated all their library discs to us for student films. We had Network, DeWolfe (and of course, I took the one some Dawn Of The Dead cues) and KPM. At that time, most of the students found the music to be dated and uncool, but I loved digging through it.

    Of course, all those libraries now organize these old tracks and re-issue them as “Retro” and you find them being used all over the place. Select Tracks has the Ronald Stein library which has music from some classics like Dementia 13. I posted that here at some point.

  3. Atari Adventure Square says:

    Those production tracks of yesteryear are the ongoing soundtrack to my daily groove.

    Those KPM, Bruton, Rouge and especially De Wolfe records hold the oft-heard unknown gems that balance the right amount of zesty momentum with humble harmonics to sit in the background and let the whatever subject be the focus.
    And since there are no commercial subjects when listening to these great instrumentals, it’s easy to feel focused in on oneself, as the day moves on.

    And yeah, one of my favorite albums is the Dawn of the Dead Incidental Music, taken from these collections.
    Had it shipped from the U.K. the week it came out. Then found it again in a record store here in Canada a year later and bought it for a friend.
    And yes, I feel focused in being in a zombie apocalypse when it plays.

    And btw, the great Italian Piero Umiliani made a bunch of nifty production albums as well as making memorable western and giallo tracks.
    Good stuff as well.

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