Retro Records: Ray Bradbury’s “There Will Come Soft Rains”- Read By Leonard Nimoy

The Martian Chronicles - Leonard Nimoy - Ray Bradbury
Welcome back to a new installment of Retro Records and this week we have a nice little audible treat for your ears, Leonard Nimoy reading Ray Bradbury’s “There Will Come Soft Rains”, originally released on Caedmon Records back in 1975.

From Weird Fantasy #17, illustrated by Wally Wood.

From Weird Fantasy #17, illustrated by Wally Wood.

It is a tale of an object that had great purpose in the lives of its charges but is now rendered pointless. A moving short story and a fantastic example of how Bradbury could give…life…to an object, a collection of humming circuits and wires, how a house of the future spends it’s last day. Of course Nimoy’s narration doesn’t hurt the story in the least, his delivery is deadpan for the most part and even though I know the ending of the story I still felt myself becoming anxious as disaster begins to loom.

So come join us today on Retro Records as we take a few minutes and wait down here in the Retroist Vault for inveitably “There Will Come Soft Rains”.

[Via] Max Mercury

For a look at what that house of the future might have resembled, why not enjoy this video showcasing the 1957 Disneyland “Monsanto House of the Future”?

[Via] Expo Lounge

For a different look of the same house why not take a quick peek at a similar post by the Retroist from back in 2009?

VicSage

Editor at Retroist
Searching through the alleys for useful knowledge in the city of Nostalgia. Huge cinema fanatic and sometimes carrier of the flame for the weirding ways of 80s gaming, toys, and television. When his wife lets him he is quite happy sitting in the corner eating buckets of beef jerky.

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One thought on “Retro Records: Ray Bradbury’s “There Will Come Soft Rains”- Read By Leonard Nimoy

  1. Max Power says:

    Possibly my favorite SF short story. At the first listen, the shock is over the family. In later listenings, you may think about whether a complex intelligent system like the house is “alive” and if it’s rational to feel sad for its suffering and destruction.
    For the old-time-radio fans, there have been several good radio adaptations of it. Both Dimension X and X Minus One had adaptations in 1950 and 1956 respectively. If I remember correctly, the 1956 version had a different plot in which people abandoned earth, instead of being incinerated.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There_Will_Come_Soft_Rains_(short_story)
    I didn’t realize it until this morning, but Teasdale’s poem was written in 1920, long before the atomic bomb. I always assumed it was post WWII.

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