Scorch vs. Fish Police

It should not come as a surprise that I was less than a social butterfly as a young tween. Inasmuch as I am the Only Living Person to have watched, live, the entire, ultimately aborted run of CBS’s early ’90s attempt to compete with ABC’s TGIF lineup of family-friendly sitcoms on Friday nights. Scorch, an ALF ripoff about a crappy dragon puppet stuck in modern times, and Fish Police, an animated noir parody about police that are fish, were cancelled after just three weeks.

Brian Boone

From the middle of nowhere in the Pacific Northwest, I contribute to the Retroist, write for trivia publications, and blog about music in a humorous fashion. I feel about "Back to the Future" the way you feel about "Star Wars." Also, I'm married and have a child (sorry ladies, orphans).

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2 thoughts on “Scorch vs. Fish Police

  1. Nick says:

    Fish Police was a surprisingly good underground comic book put out by Comico that I used to collect in the mid/late 80s. It was later distributed by Marvel when the TV show was going to happen (some of the covers state “As Seen on TV!”). Sadly, the animated show didn’t live up to the original material (surprise, surprise).

  2. We were just talking about Fish Police on a cartoon-themed episode of The Flopcast a couple of weeks back. I was a big fan of the comic book, but gave up on the cartoon version quickly.

    The Fish Police comic book bounced around several different publishers. It started as a black & white self-published series (using the publisher name “Fishwrap”), then moved to Comico, then Apple (which also published the Fish Shticks companion series), then the color version from Marvel.

    And just recently, a short Fish Police story, by original creator Steve Moncuse, appeared in an issue of Dark Horse Presents (making Dark Horse at least the fifth Fish Police publisher)!

    As a kid I was intrigued by an ad in Comics Buyer’s Guide for the original series, and when issue #1 came out, I sent in a fan letter. And I was thrilled when Steve Moncuse not only printed the letter, but sent me a personal reply. One of my first interactions with an actual comic book creator…

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