Charley’s War: The End (Review)

Image courtesy of Titan Books.

Image courtesy of Titan Books.


Thanks to our friends over at Titan Books this weekend I’ve had the pleasure of reading all manner of World War comics.

Charley’s War: The End is the last of a 10 book collection of comic strips created by Pat Mills (ABC Warriors, Marshal Law) and illustrated by Joe Colquhoun (Battle, Johnny Red). The strip was originally published back in 1979 and ran until 1985 and mainly followed the exploits of Charley Bourne from when he enlisted with the British Army at the age of 16 until the end of the first World War.

This collection contains those last emotional and epic days. This is also the first time that these strips have been collected and include Colquhoun’s original artwork! In this collection there is a wonderful feature on the Treaty of Versailles by Steve White and strip commentary by Pat Mills himself at the end of the book. Mills does a fantastic job of writing about the horrors of the first World War and the fate of some of the characters will hit you like a punch in the gut.

Image courtesy of the Comic Realm.

Image courtesy of the Comic Realm.

You can purchase Charley’s War: The End as well as the rest of the series over at Amazon.Com.

VicSage

Editor at Retroist
Searching through the alleys for useful knowledge in the city of Nostalgia. Huge cinema fanatic and sometimes carrier of the flame for the weirding ways of 80s gaming, toys, and television. When his wife lets him he is quite happy sitting in the corner eating buckets of beef jerky.

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2 thoughts on “Charley’s War: The End (Review)

  1. I’ve never liked military comics myself, the subject matter doesn’t appeal to me & both the art and text tend to be gritty and unappealing.

    However, if you’re into them, you can find scans of my golden age war comics to download or read online at digitalcomicmuseum.org and comicbookplus.com. These are all comics which have fallen into the public domain, so they’re available for free.

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