Everyday is nice day for a White Wedding with Billy Idol

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Ready to take another journey beyond the static veil to the land where audio and visual are married into a phantasmagorical whirlwind of pure rock n’ roll insanity? Awesome! And speaking of married…

billy-idol-white-wedding

Billy Idol’s 1982 hit song and video White Wedding is possibly one of the most iconic music videos ever created. Copious usage of slow-motion, blood, women shaking their pleather enrobed posteriors in front of the leering lens of the camera, profane usage of sacred tropes…this one has it all, and it’s awesome! And that doesn’t even cover the star of the show, Billy Idol himself. Idol is a sneering, wiry, smoke belching rock n’ roll demon whose visage is forever tattooed upon the consciousness of a generation of disaffected youth who were more than ready to raise their fists at society and demand their televised revolution. “I Want My MTV” indeed.

The video also had a profound influence on my creativity as well. As I wrote my first novella The House of Thirteen Doors, I pictured the story as a movie…a movie with the same visual sensibilities as White Wedding. I pictured every exterior presented with bizarre colored filters and outré characters moving dreamlike through gothic locales. And as for that motorcycle smashing into the room? Well, that made its way in there too!

So why not take the plunge and walk down the aisle with ol’ Billy today? Head here, enjoy the show, and don’t forget to share your video memories in the comments section below!

Stay Spooky!


8 Responses to Everyday is nice day for a White Wedding with Billy Idol

  1. Doug says:

    Another great choice. Quintessential early MTV, one of the first videos I ever saw. Scarred me for life.

  2. Thanks Doug, and I agree, this video has stayed with me since the first day I saw it!

  3. Great work! Awesome video too.

  4. Thanks, glad you dig it!

  5. The Retroist says:

    Love this series. I started clicking on the video to listed, then I go into and click on another recommended music video and before you know it I am programming my own retro music video hour.

  6. @The Retroist I’m so glad you like the series! I’m having a great time working on the articles and art, and I know what you mean…I look up one video, and before you know it I’ve watched like 30!

  7. Atari Adventure Square says:

    Great choice for a video viewback, Daniel!
    And I gotta add props again to the artwork, which gives so much style to the coming words, it’s like turning on a blacklight and the room transforms.

    Yeah, Billy Idol’s look has carried on as an instantly recognizable music figure.
    But when he first appeared to my High-School eyes and ears, like Adam Ant, it was a bit hard to reconcile the mixture of punk-look and pop musical output.

    The Punk movement oozed out of areas invisible to sheltered kids like myself and smudged TV screens (only place I coulda seen it) with the likes of Wendy O Williams, Fear, and The Clash (to name the few I vividly remember, mostly from the SNL-rival Fridays – though Belushi insisted on bringing Lee Ving and his band Fear to SNL).

    Having been unable to wrap my head around The Plasmatics’ visually destructive musical sets and strategically-placed electrical tape, I must say Adam Ant and Billy were a welcome addition to my understanding of the punk scene (as seen through pop-colored glasses).

    Theirs is the music I strived to learn on guitar. While God Save The Queen may have had more bite, the growing scene and their sickly social stances never meant much until my young adulthood, where my inner punk faked it with the rest of the disaffected lot around me.

    But seeing Billy Idol’s video where he does his thing and has fun with the vibe seems like a ‘Last Man Standing’ statement to me, today.

    He makes more sense than ever.

  8. I couldn’t agree with you more Atari Adventure Square! Growing up in an incredibly small town, the almost superhero like figures of Billy Idol and Adam Ant offered immediate escape from everyday living. They were larger than life figure that existed in a glossy pop world that seemed a million light years away to me as a child, whereas The Clash, Sex Pistols et al were too street based and “real” to offer me any sense of vicarious escapism.
    Thanks again for offering your perspective, as always it is most welcome, and I’m glad you liked the art and article!

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